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Paltrow’s Goop is on blast as watchdog group calls advertising foul

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(BUSINESS NEWS) Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop brand is under scrutiny as a consumer watchdog group found a few questionable truths.

GOOP THERE IT IS

Consumer watchdog group Truth in Advertising (TINA) sent a complaint letter to the California Food Drug and Medical Device Task Force urging attorneys to investigate Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, Goop.

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TINA claims to have found over 50 instances of Goop claiming its products could treat or otherwise alleviate anything from depression and anxiety to arthritis and infertility. Cool, but unsubstantiated.

FAKE NEWS

“The problem is that the company does not possess the competent and reliable scientific evidence required by law to make such claims,” TINA stated. The watchdog group compiled a list of advertising claims from Goop they find questionable, including this selection:

  • Essential oils that can “help tremendously with chronic issues from anxiety and depression to migraines”
  • Vitamins called “High School Genes” that reset blood sugar, thyroid, cortisol levels and “hormones to improve efficiency of metabolism”
  • Jade eggs claiming to increase hormonal balance

You can revel in the full list of claims at TINA’s site.

KEEP OFF THE GRASS

Members of TINA also attended Goop’s first wellness seminar, and were paid upwards of $1500 to test products and sit in on panel discussions. During the conference, TINA members noted a barista claimed the grass-fed butter in the coffee served could improve brain function.

However, said barista was unable to provide a sufficient explanation of how exactly the butter worked in tangent with cognition.

WELLNESS WARRIORS

On August 11, TINA sent a warning letter to Goop, stating they would file a complaint with regulators if Goop didn’t take action to correct their marketing by August 18.

Since the changes in advertising were minimal during this incredibly short time frame, TINA submitted their complaint to the California Food Drug and Medical Device Task Force.

“Goop needs to stop its misleading profits-over-people marketing immediately,” TINA noted their a statement.

SORRY I’M SO POPULAR

In response, Goop provided the following statement to Consumerist: “Goop is dedicated to introducing unique products and offerings and encouraging constructive conversation surrounding new ideas. We are receptive to feedback and consistently seek to improve the quality of the products and information referenced on our site.

We responded promptly and in good faith to the initial outreach from representatives of TINA and hoped to engage with them to address their concerns. Unfortunately, they provided limited information and made threats under arbitrary deadlines which were not reasonable under the circumstances.

Nevertheless, while we believe that TINA’s description of our interactions is misleading and their claims unsubstantiated and unfounded, we will continue to evaluate our products and our content and make those improvements that we believe are reasonable and necessary in the interests of our community of users.”

GOOP’S OOPS

I cannot stress enough that this brand was founded by a person who named one of their children Apple. Perhaps that should have been the start of the watchdog’s list of complaints. Am I maybe just bitter that Gwyneth Paltrow decided to shift her focus from acting to peddling healing crystals, meaning I’ll never get a follow up to the Royal Tenenbaums?

Absolutely. But that still doesn’t excuse pretending like charcoal soap will cure psoriasis. Now it’s either up to Goop to get real with their advertising, or the wrath of a task force will descend.

#GoopOops

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