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The best nonprofit companies to work for in America

(BUSINESS) The nonprofit world has worked hard to be quality employers, but they’re now combined to be one of the largest sectors in the nation.

Nonprofits are often overlooked in the professional workforce. John Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies recognizes that nonprofits are America’s third largest workforce, behind retail trade and manufacturing.

Some states actually have more nonprofit employees than all manufacturing workers combined. The nonprofit industry is not only important to the underserved in your community, it’s also a vital part of the economy.

With more Americans caring about social responsibility, Indeed.com looked at the top-rated nonprofit workplaces. Their data analysts named these nonprofits as the best places to work for:

1. Communities in Schools

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This national organization is headquartered in Virginia, but works directly with over 2,300 schools in 25 states. The basic program model is to build relationships with at-risk students to encourage them to stay in school. Last year, it claimed the number-five place on the list, but it topped the list at number-one this year.

2. Boy Scouts of America

Coming in at number-two, the BSA also targets youth, which is a key factor in many of the top nonprofits. Indeed.com reports some of the reviews of the staff said it “was like a big family” and “benefits were good.”

3. International Rescue Committee

Charity Navigator gives IRC an overall rating of 92.92 out of 100 for accountability, transparency and financial information. It’s also a great place to work, according to Indeed.com. The organization has been around since 1933, providing emergency aid to refugees and people displaced by war or natural disaster. Not only does the IRC work internationally, it also helps people in the United States.

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4. Habitat for Humanity

Former President Jimmy Carter has long been a supporter of Habitat for Humanity. Not surprisingly, it’s located in his home state of Georgia. It’s a job that will teach team-building and working with prospective homeowners.

5. AARP

Although many of the nonprofits serve children, seniors are another vulnerable population. AARP serves people 55-plus. It has a diversified staff, with a “strong culture of mentoring.” Just what you’d want to see in a professional setting.

Whether you’re job-seeking or hiring, don’t discount the experience of working at a nonprofit.

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Dawn Brotherton is a Sr. Staff Writer at The American Genius with an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Central Oklahoma. She is an experienced business writer with over 10 years of experience in SEO and content creation. Since 2017, she has earned $60K+ in grant writing for a local community center, which assists disadvantaged adults in the area.

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