Connect with us

Business Entrepreneur

Top 10 cities in the world for women entrepreneurs

Women entrepreneurs find friendly environments in some cities, but unfavorable conditions in others. Which cities are best for budding female entrepreneurs.

Published

on

female entrepreneurs

“Who run the world? Girls!”

Thanks, Beyoncé, we think so too! Now, more than ever before, women are knocking on the glass ceiling that separates them from the top echelon of money-making. For decades, we’ve slowly climbed and clawed our way to the top of a ladder created by men for men, but rest assured, gentlemen, we are coming for you. #equality

bar
Obviously, there are both awful and ideal cities throughout the world for business-minded women, and lucky for us I.N.D.E.P.E.N.D.E.N.T ladies, The Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Cities Index can calculate exactly where they are, based on a precise methodology.

The Index, or “WE,” measures each city’s attractiveness and ability to support women with high profile businesses, as well as women who are seeking opportunities for career growth. The WE focuses on five subcategories that together create an overall score. The criteria are: markets, talent, capital, culture and technology.

So, what cities rank atop the list, you might ask? Ask and you shall receive, my friends.

The top 10 cities for women entrepreneurs

1. The obvious no-brainer – “… hear it from New York, New York, New York! (Thanks, Alicia.)” The Big Apple ranked at the top of nearly every list, making it the clear winner for career-driven women everywhere.

2. Across the country, sits the lovely and high-ranking San Francisco Bay area. It came in as a strong second in terms of market and capital scores.

3. Hop across the Atlantic and you could learn from the queen bee (literally) herself at Buckingham Palace. It is notable that London was in the top six of four out of the five subcategories. That said, the Index was released prior to the Brexit, so the economic shakeup could alter future WE results for London.

4. Next up is Stockholm, Sweden. If technology is your baby, Stockholm is your little place in the sun. It ranked first in tech.

5. Singapore ranks in the top third of the 25 cities rated for talent, culture, and technology. The trifecta!

6. Toronto in the great north, eh? Toronto actually beat out New York City in the culture subcategory, and that makes me wonder if I should consider taking up residency full-time, hmm…

Rounding out the top 10 we have Washington D.C. in 7th, Sydney, Australia in 8th, Seattle, Washington in 9th, and Munich, Germany in 10th.

A special homage to Austin

I would like to pay special homage to Austin, Texas, coming in at no. 12 on the WE list. Even though they didn’t clear the top 10, Austin came in at number one in technology related policy for women. Clearly, noteworthy!

#MixedFeelings

Peering at these rankings, I feel both inspired and repressed. The mere fact that someone has taken the time to create such a list is indicative of progress. However, the fact that it has to exist at all shows that work is still needed as a global culture.

So, to you strong, career-oriented gals, maybe these are places to consider or maybe they aren’t right for you at all. Whatever you decide, keep knocking until that glass ceiling shatters.

#WomenEntrepreneurs

Staff writer, Ashley Lombardo, earned her B.S. in journalism from The University of Florida and has used her skills to report on everything from the economy to productivity. She is well-known for her tremendously positive presence, and when she's not trying to save the world she indulges in red wine, friends, fitness, books, bubble baths, shoes, family and love.

Business Entrepreneur

Is this normal (you wonder about your business)?

(ENTREPRENEURIALISM) It can be lonely not being able to openly ask potentially embarrassing questions about your business – there’s a way to do it anonymously…

Published

on

facebook

Entrepreneurialism is wildly rewarding – you are fully in control of the direction of your company, and you’re solving the world’s problems. But it’s also isolating when you’re not sure if what you’re experiencing is normal.

Sure, there’s Google, news networks (like ours), and professional connections to help you navigate, but sometimes you just want to know if something simple you’re seeing is normal.

Is Instagram Stories really where it’s at? Probably not if you’re a consultant.

Is it normal for an employee to attempt to re-negotiate their salary on their first day? Nope, but how do you keep the desirable employee without being bullied into new terms?

Do all entrepreneurs spend their first year in business as exhausted as a new parent? Sometimes.

You have questions, and together, we can share our experiences.

We have a brand new Facebook Group that is already wildly engaging, active, and you’d be amazed at how selflessly helpful people are – and we invite you to be one of them.

Want to anonymously ask a question about something you’re unsure is normal or not?

Click here to submit your question, and we’ll select as many as possible to discuss in the Facebook Group!

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Amazon on a collision course with politicians as they strengthen their monopoly

(BUSINESS) E-commerce has come a long way in the last decade, specifically led by Amazon, but are their controlling ways putting them on a collision course with regulators?

Published

on

amazon

In March, Amazon stopped replenishing weekly purchase orders for tens of thousands of vendors in a move that has stirred up some trouble. The tech giant has once flexed its power over first-party sellers over their platform. And it’s not the first time.

Amazon originally sent out to vendors as an automated message citing the hold up in orders as a technical glitch. The following day, vendors were told the change was permanent. The affected vendors were categorized as making $10 million or less in sales volume per year and not having managers at Amazon. Vendors selling specialized goods that were difficult to ship were also a factor.

The effects can have remarkable effects on the market as Amazon’s algorithms decide who is able to sell what to whom via their near-ubiquitous platform. According to John Ghiorso, the CEO of Orca Pacific, an Amazon agency for consultation and manufacturers representatives, the decision is driven by financial data such as total revenue, profitability, and catalog size.

In a response from an Amazon spokesperson, the change was made in order to improve value, convenience, and selection for customers. The mass termination of purchase orders and the delayed response from Amazon herald the transition to the One Vendor system, putting vendors in an exclusive relationship with Amazon. This system will merge the current Seller Central and Vendor Central.

Amazon’s message is loud and clear: they will do what’s in their best interest to mitigate the market for their convenience. One may be reminded of the anti-trust lawsuit against Microsoft in 2001.

The lack of warning didn’t do them any favors either.

While smaller businesses need to change for Amazon’s program, first-party business will revolve around larger brands like Nike with whom Amazon is maintaining a relationship.

Despite the streamlined platform Amazon is going for, the company wields power over vendors and customers alike. Capitalism is one thing, but monopolies are a whole other ball game, and politicians are finally paying attention.

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Culture Codes is the guide you need for company culture questions

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) One of the biggest sellers of a company to a prospective employee or customer is their culture. Culture Codes has compiled some the biggest companies cultures in convenient decks for you to study and align with.

Published

on

culture codes

Organizational culture is a hot button of conversation. While a variety of definitions exist, one way of defining Culture is the way businesses exist – a summary of values, rituals, and organizational mythology that helps employees make sense of the organization they work in.

Organizational cultures are often reflected in Mission, Vision, and Value statements of organizations.

What many entrepreneurs or new organization struggle with as well, is how to create a culture from the ground up. What kinds of statements and values do they advocate? What are areas of focus? Who are our competitors and what can we do to create a service, product, or quality advantage?

Building a strong culture can be challenging, but a good place to start is looking at the best cultures around.

A new resource by Tettra, Culture Codes, has everything you could want to know on different companies their cultures available for you to study up.

Over 40 companies employing over 280,000 employees have created culture decks and collected core values and mission statements. Companies like Spotify, Netflix, LinkedIn, and NASA have all contributed information.

This information is great for young companies or entrepreneurs to start building a schema about what kind of culture they want to create.

Or existing established companies can look towards peers and competitors and help decide what statements they want to engage culture change on.

For job seekers, Tettra can help potential employees gauge if they are a fit for an organization, or discover that maybe an organization they dream about working for has a culture they may not jive with. And perhaps most valuably, transparently showing off your culture and allowing it to be compared means that organizations can better compete in the talent market.

Recruiters should be obsessed with talking about culture – because it keeps people in the door.

The reasons why people leave employment: work/ life balance, poor treatment, lack of training, or relationship issues with a supervisor or boss; in many ways are a by-product of organizational culture. If you want to compete in the talent market, make culture a selling point and show it off in everything you do.

Even consumer’s benefit from learning about an organization’s culture – values that indicate a commitment to excellence in ethics make consumers feel good about supporting an organization.

It pays to have a good culture. I encourage you to head over to tetra.co/culture-codes and see how companies like Etsy are keeping it real, every day.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!