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Op/Ed

The counter-intuitive way successful people accomplish their goals

(EDITORIAL) It may seem counter-intuitive, but reaching goals comes down to throwing away the one metric we can’t help but use.

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success goals

Time isn’t always of the essence

Many of us have a tendency to attempt to make changes to our lives at specific times; “I’ll start my diet on Monday,” “That will be my New Years Resolution.” Because of this, the changes we set out to make are often unsuccessful because we pigeon hole ourselves to a specific time frame.

Here’s a secret: being less focused with a calendar-based time constraint and more focused on actually making the change is the key to success. We can often be hard on ourselves if we don’t accomplish our goals by some set time, and we lose sight of what is really important.

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Today’s the day

Instead of waiting for January 1st to roll around, ask yourself today what changes you want to make. Whether it be a personal or a professional change, it is essential to check in with yourself every so often to see if you like the way things are going in your life.

For example, say that the change you would like to see made is that you get a promotion. That’s a good start, although it’s fairly abstract. From there, you have to dwindle down to a plan of action.

Be specific and honest with yourself

Your next step may be to make a list of the ways you can get to that promotion: get to work a little earlier/stay a little later, seek out new tasks and responsibilities rather than wait for them to be assigned to you, initiate some sort of team building activity, etc.

The more detailed and less abstract your plan is, the more likely it is to be successful.

Now, once you have your idea all worked out, it is time for execution.

Hold yourself accountable

In order to keep yourself on track, try keeping a journal of your accomplishments. This helps to create a personal environment of motivation and it’s great to have on hand come performance review time.

If you need a bigger push in regard to accountability, maybe recruit a friend (either a personal friend or in the workplace) and urge them to set goals for themselves as well. This way, you have someone to check in with and someone to motivate you.

In the end…

At the end of the day, change has to come from your own intrinsic motivation. Opportunities, generally, don’t just fall into one’s lap, so don’t waste your time waiting for something to happen…make it happen.

#GoalGetter

Staff Writer, Taylor Leddin is a publicist and freelance writer for a number of national outlets. She was featured on Thrive Global as a successful woman in journalism, and is the editor-in-chief of The Tidbit. Taylor resides in Chicago and has a Bachelor in Communication Studies from Illinois State University.

Op/Ed

Inflation: Where you should invest your emergency fund to beat it

(EDITORIAL) Inflation is at an all-time high, so where can small business owners and entrepreneurs stash their emergency funds to come out ahead?

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Glass jar of coins labeled House Fund.

Inflation has been no mystery over the past year to those in the U.S., but many are questioning how long it’s here to stay and the impacts it will have on the economy.

According to The Consumer Price Index that measures the average change of prices over time estimated a year-over-year gain of 5.4% in September, an all-time high for several decades. Also, the core personal consumption expenditures price index, the preferred method of inflation measurement by the Federal Reserve’s reached a shocking 30-year high in August, when it was up 3.6% over the previous year.

Presumably, the hardest hit of all in the last year or two has been small business owners and entrepreneurs, where 67% feel that inflation will damage their ability to recover. If you’re still holding on to an emergency fund or in the process of building one and you’re looking to stay afloat the rising costs, you’ve come to the right place!

Don’t have a designated emergency fund but your interest is peaked? Let’s break it down: An emergency fund is a type of savings account, aside from checking, that you should set aside for well…an emergency! This could be for that rattling noise in your car you’ve been avoiding or to help bridge a gap between jobs while searching.

We suggest an emergency fund of at least $1,000, then building it up to 3-6 months of expenses. The purpose of the fun is to have a reasonable amount of cash set aside that is liquid, or in simpler terms, available immediately if necessary.

Magnifying glass and toy house representing searching for a home with a piggy bank in the back.

Our top picks for stashing an emergency fund are high-yield savings accounts, money market accounts, or CDs.

First, high-yield savings accounts (HYSAs) are similar to a regular savings account but with the perk of higher interest rates. The current average percent yield (APY) for these accounts is around .50% though the national average is a measly .07%.

Second, money market accounts (MMAs) are a hybrid of checking and savings, but sometimes with more restrictions such as transaction fees or a balance minimum. Due to these requirements, the APY tends to be on the higher side and you may also receive a debit card linked to the account for ease of access.

Third, certificates of deposits (CDs) generally offer the best interest rates of the 3 options, but are the least liquid, as your money is tied up for a set time period. The longer you don’t have access to the money, the more interest will be paid.

As you can see, interest rates aren’t that notable, at least for now. Don’t stress too much about maximizing ROI on an emergency fund as it’s meant to be a safety net if you need it. If you have an emergency fund, you’re already ahead.

Notes the Federal Reserve, 59% did not have emergency savings that could cover 3 months of expenses in late 2019, and nearly 4 out of 10 either could not pay all of their monthly expenses in full or did not expect to be able to do so if faced with a modest emergency expense.” A global pandemic didn’t help.

Stay in front of it now so inflation doesn’t cut your future funds short.

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Op/Ed

How can you prevent deepfake trickery?

(EDITORIAL) It’s hard enough to get a complete story about anything, but the use of deepfakes makes that process harder. How can you prevent from being tricked?

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facial recognition deepfakes

Deepfakes are some the latest content entering social media and digital news outlets. Deepfakes are false photos and videos created by artificial intelligence, that at first glance, can pass off as authentic imagery.

Deepfake content appears as a person in a real picture or video that is replaced by someone else’s appearance. The deepfake can then go on to pose as the real person doing or saying things that never happened. As one can imagine, it’s possible the Internet can take one joke too far and unleash a deepfake with insidious motives.

So what are some ways to spot one of these fake videos? One of the telltale signs is the mismatched lighting or discoloration on the person’s face. Another tip is to check for blurring edges around the lips, jawline, chin, and neck where the AI is trying to superimpose the fake image atop the real one. Lip-synching can be tricky, but it helps to watch and listen to how the audio is matching up.

To some, these tips may be pretty obvious, but not everyone is familiar with editing techniques and deepfakes can pop up many places online. As of now there are no reliable programs available to catch these inconsistencies so it’s up to us to pay attention to the media we consume (the zoom tool is a BFF). With AI and software development, this fake content will only become more convincing. Fortunately, companies and even states are taking action to ban deepfakes online.

Some companies are tiptoeing the line of normalizing this kind of technology, and many people seem to be fine with that, so long as it’s for a laugh. The problem with laughing at something that looks real, but is fake, is that that can conversely cause someone to minimize something that is real because the viewer thinks it’s fake. This mentality helps no one, and can only hurt our understanding of the events that happen around us.

Ultimately, and for now, viewers should keep our heads up while online to spot the seams in our reality.

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Op/Ed

How smart cities are now impacting the construction industry

(OPINION EDITORIALS) The movement towards smart cities will change the construction industry for the best – creating more connected, collaborative, and efficient cities.

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construction site

There are few innovations in recent years as impactful as the digital revolution. The world is now on the verge of what might be the ultimate expression of mass digitization: the smart city. Interconnectivity and data have proved themselves in the business world, and now they’re moving into the streets.

As the world’s metropolises start diving into the IoT, some questions emerge. The smart city movement will spur a ripple effect of changes across many industries and aspects of daily life. How will these changes affect the construction industry?

Construction is one of the world’s largest industries, generating more than $1 trillion in the U.S. alone. Since smart city technology relies on new infrastructure, this shift will undoubtedly touch this massive sector. Here’s a closer look at how.

The smart city revolution is boosting construction.

The smart city movement is still in its infancy, so some changes will take a while. Others are more immediate, like the impact on construction revenue. One of the first effects smart cities construction companies will notice is a surge in new projects.

For areas to experience the full advantages of smart cities, they’ll need new infrastructure. All this infrastructure has to come from somewhere, so construction companies will see an increase in available opportunities. This industry boom could last for several years, as cities gradually adopt more and more smart infrastructure.

Not only will the number of construction projects increase, but these new opportunities will also be profitable. By some estimates, global smart city spending will approach $124 billion this year. Singapore, New York, Tokyo and London alone may account for as much as $1 billion of that spending.

Construction will change to meet new needs.

A more long-term change, and a more substantial one, is that the role of construction will shift. Digitization has changed what people do across various industries, and now that movement is coming to the building sector. As smart city development gradually becomes standard, construction companies will start to look more like technology businesses.

By its very nature, smart city technology requires a marriage of construction and computer sciences. Consider the ambitious Toyota Woven City project, where they’re building a small-scale smart city to test new technology. Woven City will see architects work alongside scientists and researchers to create the infrastructure necessary for things like self-driving cars to function.

The connected city movement is changing what it means for infrastructure to be functional. As a result, the industry will have to shift to fit this new definition, becoming IoT experts as much as architectural ones. This shift won’t take place immediately, but the sooner companies can morph, the better.

The industry is becoming more collaborative.

Given this technological metamorphosis in the industry, construction companies will have to embrace collaboration. The most prevalent instance of this collaboration is the one between builders and data science companies. Construction companies can’t expect to become data experts overnight, but they can reach out to data professionals.

Some businesses have already started to adopt this approach. PCL Construction is now teaming with CopperTree Analytics to incorporate data-gathering and analysis technology into their infrastructure. PCL is not a data analytics company, but by collaborating with one, they can offer the services the cities of the future need.

As new technology allows for more collaboration between companies and clients, residents will have more of a say in planning. Urban development, especially smart city development, ultimately serves the people, so construction businesses may collaborate with residents more. The public may have access to platforms where they can discuss the kinds of infrastructure they need.

A smart city could improve urban construction.

Construction companies themselves can experience some of the advantages of smart city technology. This movement isn’t only making businesses shift in the present, but will also improve them in the future. More connected city infrastructure in an area could make things easier for construction companies working on nearby projects.

Pittsburgh employs an AI-based traffic light system that reacts in real time to redirect and optimize traffic flow. This system reduces travel times by 25% and shows the potential for helping with things like in-city construction. Networks like this could redirect traffic around construction zones, reducing construction’s impact on traffic and improving safety.

With more data points in the city, crews could get a more cohesive picture of each site’s conditions. Data on traffic patterns, population and weather could help companies optimize their plan and maximize both safety and efficiency. As construction companies install more connected infrastructure, they can benefit from it.

When will this all take place?

It’s all but a guarantee that the smart city movement will cause substantial changes for the construction industry, but when these shifts will start to emerge, may not be quite as clear. As with any prediction, there’s a lot of uncertainty involved, but some changes are already taking place.

The industry will evolve as smart cities become more common, which won’t take long. The urban population has grown by 40% in the past decade alone, and this trend will likely continue. With more population in cities comes a heightened need for connected infrastructure, driving these industry changes.

As mentioned earlier, some construction companies are already starting to adopt collaborative, data-driven approaches. Within the next 10 years, this will likely become a standard throughout the industry, which will coincide with the changing role of construction. The COVID-19 pandemic may slow some of these trends, but only by a couple of years at most.

As cities change, so will construction.

In some form or another, the construction industry will change because it cannot remain stagnant and still sustain smart city development. Every sector always evolves to meet the needs and demands of the market, and construction’s market is moving toward connected cities. As urban development takes on these new tasks, the face of the sector will shift in response.

The construction industry is dynamic, which benefits us all. In the coming years, the sector will be more collaborative, more data-centric and more profitable than ever.

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