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Homeownership

American marriage is happening later and it’s not why you think

(HOMEOWNERSHIP) Marriage is happening later and later with Americans and economists believe it’s not just about the changing face of relationships; it’s also about money and wanting to wait for financial stability.

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As we know, homeownership is a cornerstone of American family life. Homes provide long-term financial stability as a major investment for homeowners. Furthermore, they also provide a strong environment in which to raise a family; so many of us have fond memories of running around our backyards, or cozying up in the family room.

So, it stands to reason that homeownership and marriage are tied together; many couples will buy a home soon before or soon after they get hitched.

With all that said, some of the following statistics may be alarming, as it points to a trend that may play into the delay of homeownership.

Lots of data gathered over the past few years shows Americans are marrying later and later, if at all, according to a report from The Guardian. Today, Half of American adults are married, compared to 75 percent in 1960. The disparities are mostly consistent with class divisions.

Per the Guardian article, “26 percent of poor adults are married, compared with 51 percent in 1990.” That same study found 39 percent of the modern working class of adults are married, but that number was 57 percent in the 90s.

Education is closely tied with financial status, so an education disparity is also present. Today, 50 percent of adults with a high school are married; that rate was over 60 percent 25 years ago.

As the Guardian puts it, “Young people are increasingly seeing marriage as a “capstone” rather than a “cornerstone” event, a crowning achievement once other goals have been reached, rather than a launchpad for adulthood.”

That achievement is financial stability, and many more Americans are feeling a financial crunch.

There’s data to back this up, too. For example, a poll found “nearly half of never-married adults with incomes under 30k say being financially insecure is a major reason” behind their lack of marital commitment to a partner.

Part of steady income is a steady job, and past Pew Research found 78 of never-married women wanted a future partner to have a steady job.

A decline in manufacturing jobs is contributing to this as well, per some economic research on the subject, which may help to explain how the steepest drops in marriage rates come from the lower and middle class.

It’s not unreasonable to speculate that major living costs factor into that decision as well. For example, with real estate prices going up around the country, especially in major cities with strong job markets, the capstone that is owning a home is pushed farther away from the average American.

If marriage and homeownership are so closely tied together, the delay of one may also contribute to a delay in the other.

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Born in Boston and raised in California, Connor arrived in Texas for college and was (lovingly) ensnared by southern hospitality and copious helpings of queso. As an SEO professional, he lives and breathes online marketing and its impact on businesses. His loves include disc-related sports, a pint of a top-notch craft beer, historical non-fiction novels, and Austin's live music scene.

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Homeownership

A definition of the term Starter Home and why no one should use it

(HOMEOWNERSHIP) You see the term in the MLS for fixer uppers and you hear it when Realtors are working with first time buyers but the term “starter home” shouldn’t be in anyone’s vocabulary.

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Just words

Collins English Dictionary defines a starter home as a “small, new house which is cheap enough for people who are buying their first home to afford.” You won’t find the phrase too often outside of the real estate industry.

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There isn’t much about the etymology of the phrase, but most likely, it’s a marketing ploy to get people to buy into the idea of purchasing another home in a few years.

Grind your gears

Mark Greutman, husband to Lauren Greutman, believes that the term “starter home” should bother people. The phrase implies that you will upgrade later.

Your starter home isn’t good enough for the rest of your life. And not to get into how well Americans have it, what about people who will never be able to afford anything more? Is it an insult to them?

Do You Really Need Two Living Rooms?

Older generations bought one home and lived in it until they could no longer be independent. In today’s world, we buy a starter home, then upgrade to have more space, to live farther away from our neighbors, to have rooms that are only used once or twice a year, and to make sure you have a two or three car garage to hold your vehicles and more stuff, some of which isn’t taken out very often.

But consider this – You could pay off your starter home in 15 to 20 years, if you budget right.

You could be out from under a mortgage and have money to travel, send the kids to college or even retire early. When you think about what led to the financial crisis in 2008, isn’t it better to have a smaller house where you can make the payments than worry about losing your house?

Be Content Where You Are

Realtors are motivated to make sure that they have customers. If people buy one home with the intent to stay, will the market dry up? Probably not, because people move and a new generation will be ready to purchase homes for their own family.

Let’s think about that phrase, “starter home.” It fuels consumerism and discontentment. Don’t call cheaper houses starter homes, but just a home.

#StarterHome

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Homeownership

Modpools repurposes shipping containers into residential pools

(HOMEOWNERSHIP) Pools are getting hipper and cooler and Modpools is the proof. Make a splash while swimming in a shipping container – yep, you read that right.

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Treat yo’self to a cutting edge, futuristic pool. Canadian company Modpools repurposes shipping containers into fully-functional swimming pools for residential properties.

Sounds trashy, but this isn’t the dumpster/tarp situation that may come to mind when you hear “re-purposed pool.”

These are post-apocalyptic chic, like when society starts reusing everything for luxurious purposes instead of just survival.

Creators of Modpools, Paul and Denise Rathnam, have worked in the modified shipping industry for over a decade. They wanted to create a pool for their three kids, and eventually released their first Modpool to the public this March.

Containers are purchased from Chinese suppliers after the cargo is shipped to North America, and modified in Modpool’s Canadian factory. Modpools ship anywhere in the world because, well, they’re literally shipping containers.

You can get an 8’x’20 or 8’x’40 pool installed and filled up in a matter of minutes unlike regular pools that can take weeks to be ready.

The pools come standard in a sleek black, and feature a huge clear window to reduce the potential claustrophobia element of hanging out in a shipping container.

Think traditional above ground pools look like trash but live in a state (hi, Texas) with notoriously hard ground?

You’re in luck.

According to the creators, “You can put it in ground, but it’s designed to be above so you can just pop it in.”

Plus, the pools look awesome with decks designed to wrap around the edges.

Oh and hey guess what? There’s a hot tub element too. Every pool features a removable divider to instantly convert half the pool into a hot tub.

If you’re looking for more reasons to love this thing, it’s totally app controlled, and can operate remotely.

Yep—this is a smart pool. Heating, jets, and color-changing LED lights are all programmable via app.

Ultraviolet sanitation keeps all the nasties out of the water and means you won’t end up with weird chlorine halo vision after a long swim session.

For more customization, customers can request specific colors for the outside of the pool, go windowless, or even make it into an endless swim spa.

Modpools also offers a wide variety of pool covers, from snap button to child safe electronically retractable ones, to prevent any mishaps.

It takes around six to eight weeks to create a Modpool, so start saving up your lemonade stand money now.

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Homeownership

NAR launches first ever profile of LGB homebuyers and sellers

(REAL ESTATE) For the first time ever, NAR has extracted data from their massive national profile of buyers and sellers to observe preferences of LGB (lesbian, gay, and bisexual) consumers – pretty interesting insights!

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LGB homebuyer profile

To celebrate Pride Month, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) dug into four years of data from their Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers to unearth similarities and differences between lesbian, gay, bisexual, and heterosexual Americans.

“The American Dream of homeownership traverses across the spectrum of our society – including sexual orientation – and Realtors® always have and will continue to advocate so that anyone who wants to, and is capable of purchasing a home, is able to do so,” said NAR President John Smaby, a second-generation Realtor® from Edina, Minnesota and broker at Edina Realty.

Smaby added, “Realtors® have always embraced the significance of the protections secured by the Fair Housing Act, and have encouraged efforts to extend them by amending our Code of Ethics in 2009 to prohibit discriminations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.”

For the purposes of this report, it appears NAR has broken the data down into three categories to observe: Heterosexual, Bisexual, and Gay/Lesbian buyers are combined into a third group.

The segment of the population most likely to indicate they’re first time homebuyers is bisexuals (at 58%), followed by gay and lesbian buyers (36%), and heterosexuals (32%).

The most likely to be a first-time home seller was bisexuals (50%), while lesbians, gays, and heterosexuals equally indicated it was their first time (36%) being a home seller.

Bisexuals were observed to be the youngest buyers, a median age of 36 years old, and had the lowest median income of $62,400. In comparison, lesbian and gay buyers were the oldest buyers at 45 years old. Heterosexual buyers reported a median age of 44 and a median income of $91,200, similar to $92,900 for lesbian and gay buyers.

Regarding each group’s preferences:

  • Homes purchased by bisexual buyers are a median of 1,840sf, with a median year built of 1966.
  • Gay and lesbian buyers purchased homes with a median of 1,900sf, and a median year built of 1974.
  • Heterosexual buyers’ median home size is 2,060 median sf, and 1985 is the median year.
  • Bisexual buyers were the most likely to purchase a detached single-family home (86%).
  • Gay and lesbian buyers were the least likely (79%), and only 10% purchased a multi-generational home.
  • Heterosexual buyers were the most likely to purchase a multi-generational home (13%).
      • Lesbian and gay buyers were most likely to purchase in an urban area or a city center (28%).
      • Bisexual buyers were most likely to buy a home in a small town (22%).
      • All sexual orientations were equally likely to purchase in a resort or recreation area (2%).
      • Bisexual buyers were most likely to have made at least one compromise in their home purchase, most likely on the price (28%), style of home (23%) or distance from their jobs (23%).
      • Lesbian and gay buyers were the least likely to have compromised on convenience to schools (7%).

      Regarding other demographic info:

      • Bisexual home buyers were less likely to identify as white/Caucasian than lesbian/gay or heterosexual buyers (77%, compared to 88% and 85%, respectively).
      • Bisexuals are nearly twice as likely to identify as Hispanic than both groups (13% compared to 7%).
      • Fully 14% of bisexual buyers were born outside of the U.S., versus 7% of lesbian and gay buyers.
      • 38% of bisexual home buyers identify as single females.
      • 25% of gay buyers identify as single men.
      • 22% of lesbian and gay buyers identify as an unmarried couple (38% as a married couple).
      • 15% of bisexual buyers identify as an unmarried couple (34% as a married couple).
      • 7% of heterosexuals identify as an unmarried couple (66% as a married couple).
      • 38% of heterosexual buyers have children in their household.
      • 29% of bisexual buyers have children in their household.
      • 11% of lesbian and gay buyers have children in their household.

      “The number of home buyers and sellers who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual has remained steady at 4% since we first included the question in our HBS survey in 2015,” said Dr. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist. “Given that Millennials now make up 37% of home buyers and attitudes regarding sexual orientation continue to shift even among Generation Z, we expect to see this percentage increase in future surveys as younger generations are more likely to self-identify as LGB.”

      Editor’s note: For the purpose of citing this study and for logistics, we used NAR’s terminology, making an exception to our internal policy to only use the acronym “LGBTQIA+” in all stories.

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