Connect with us

Real Estate Marketing

How to optimize your marketing to reach each generation

(MARKETING) Knowing how each generation is interacting with marketing content will help you keep your edge in your chosen markets – here’s your update!

Published

on

social media marketing

In the last few years, a higher premium has been set on presenting your content appropriately to your audience. In order to do this, you must really learn about the demographics of your audience as a way to speak to them in the most effective way.

We can do this by looking through our follower list, determining the audience that would most benefit from our audiences, and opening the floor for questions. Sometimes we rely on studies and other collections of data to show us what certain audiences dig and don’t dig.

Such was the case with Koeppel Direct’s roundup regarding optimizing your content for every age group. They broke it down in such a way that helps us look at different generational online uses.

First up, we have our Baby Boomers, who were born between 1946 and 1964. According to the data, they make up 74 percent of the US population. Sixty-seven percent of that population uses smart phones, while 57 percent use social media. The favorite platform of Boomers is Facebook, with 31.9 percent using the social media site.

It’s recommend to tailor content for Boomers in the following ways: make your content text-light (300 words is the preferred article length of this generation), videos that are heavy on information (slower-paced is preferred over fast), and Facebook-optimized content (57% will visit a company’s website after seeing them appear on social media, and 34% will make a purchase).

Next on deck, Generation X. This group was born between 1965 and 1980, and make up 66 million of the US population. Eighty-five percent own smartphones and 75% use social media (with 45 million Facebook users and 23.5 million Instagram users).

The content recommendations for Gen X are: longer-form video (30-second mobile video ads are preferred over ads that are shorter), tablet-optimized content, and 48% are more likely to buy from a company that offers instructional videos.

Now, everyone’s favorite, Millennials! These peeps graced the earth between 1981 and 1996 (May of ’94 brought you yours truly) and they make up 71 million of the population. Ninety-two percent own smartphones and 85 percent use social media (with 59 million Facebook users and 43 million Instagram users).

Unsurprisingly, two out of three Millennials prefer online shopping. The recommended content comes in the way of: shorter-form video (10-seconds preferred), interactive content (it’s all about the experience! Even with campaigns), email campaigns (Millennials spent 6 hours a day going through email, with 77% wanting to receive business communication by email).

Additional tips include: personalizing content, using less text, and sharing mobile coupons and rewards.

Finally, we’re at the end of the alphabet with Generation Z. Zs were born between 1997 and 2012 (so they were learning to walk during the peak of Friends) and make up 60 million of the population. A whopping 95 percent have access to smartphones.

The favorites of social media include: 73 percent on Instagram, 69 percent on Snapchat (noted to be more popular with girls), and 80 percent say that social media influences their shopping (thanks, Insta models!)

It’s recommended to use: online video ads (56 percent take action after seeing a video), video marketing (85 percent use YouTube), and socially conscious content (94 percent feel that companies and brands should take stands on environmental and social issues).

The roundup also notes that in 2017, it was determined that the average human attention span is eight seconds (which is a 33 percent decrease from 2000).

There was also a 99 percent increase in branded video content views on YouTube over 2016.

In 2019, 80 percent of all web traffic so far is video. Think about that one.

This information is ever-evolving and helpful to keep an eye on. However, it’s important to note that this is a sample of these generational populations, and not every item applies to each population member. Do your own research to really get to know your audience!

Staff Writer, Taylor Leddin is a publicist and freelance writer for a number of national outlets. She was featured on Thrive Global as a successful woman in journalism, and is the editor-in-chief of The Tidbit. Taylor resides in Chicago and has a Bachelor in Communication Studies from Illinois State University.

Real Estate Marketing

Stupid Facebook rule will not show your ad if you use these words

(REAL ESTATE MARKETING) Facebook has plenty of other things to worry about other than abbreviations, but your ad could go invisible if you use these…

Published

on

facebook

Social media advertising expert Jon Loomer has been in the game for a long time. You’d expect him to know any Facebook rule inside and out—so would he. So he was surprised when he uncovered a fairly niche rule that caused one of his recent ads to be rejected. Basically, don’t call FB “FB”.

Facebook’s rules require that ads not reference Facebook or Instagram in a way that goes against their brand guidelines. Since Loomer’s business involves educating people on Facebook marketing, he usually asks for a manual review and calls it a day. But this time around, someone specified that abbreviating Facebook and Instagram to “FB” and “IG” aren’t permitted in advertisements.

Surprisingly, Facebook will let you use the Facebook and Instagram logos in its ads, so long as you use the most up-to-date versions, and don’t spell their names wrong.

There’s no word on whether Facebook’s rebrand as FACEBOOK will be reflected in the new ad requirements, but that rebranding seems to be limited to the parent company, and not its flagship website and app. (That rebrand, the recipient of a great deal of online mockery, appears to be an attempt to dodge an FTC breakup.)

Facebook’s advertising side is notoriously difficult to work with. Advertisers do get customer support in a way that end users very much do not, but the rules can be ill-defined and selectively applied, especially if you’re working in a highly-regulated field.

And yet, Mark Zuckerberg recently stated outright that politicians, specifically, will be allowed to tell verifiable falsehoods in political ads on his platforms, framing the issue as a question of free speech. (Another fun little fact about Facebook’s advertising standards: In January 2018, they banned all cryptocurrency ads because they “are frequently associated with misleading or deceptive promotional practices.” Now they’re launching a cryptocurrency of their own.

Even as Facebook (er, sorry, FACEBOOK) expands into new arenas, its public persona is very much that of a multi-billion dollar company that somehow manages to be on its back foot all of the time. In April, Zuckerberg announced that it was going to become a “privacy-focused messaging and social networking platform,” roughly a year after appearing in Congress over Facebook’s spectacular failure to be a privacy-focused anything.

All that to say – if you’re running for office, you can lie all you want, but for the love of all that’s holy, don’t abbreviate Facebook to “FB,” or your ad will be rejected.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Marketing

Your website copy may be too hard to read; these services help

(MARKETING) Your website copy may be too dense, unreadable, and turning away sales. Here’s some tech to help you out.

Published

on

website copy

You’ve got a killer product or service you’re about to unleash on the world. The bank accounts are made, coffee pot is running, and you’re ready to start reeling in the sales. With your slick new website, you just know your phone is going to start ringing off the hook. But then, it doesn’t.

What gives? Bad UI? Typo in the phone number? One possible reason you’re not getting DM-ed may surprise you – your web copy.

Developing the clear-as-water copy that is going to get you hired or your product sold can be a toughie. Those words you loving poured your time and energy into might be making your potential leads mash the back button. Why? If you or one of your employees wrote the website, you can know your subject too well.

That expertise and familiarity, which makes you amazing at your job, can make it difficult for an outsider to understand what you do. The more difficult you make that understanding for your reader, the less likely you’ll turn a sale.

Case in point: Most people browsing the internet spend less than 15 seconds on a website. That means you have less than 15 seconds to hook your potential client before they remember they have a cat video to finish.

Many a great business died on a piles of jargon, dense sentences and trendy buzzwords. But never fear! Since hiring an army of copywriters is cost-prohibitive, we’ve got some suggestions on services you can use to make that copy do work.

Clarity Grader

Clarity Grader allows you to put a website’s full text into its grading portal or even analyze a url. What you get is a free plain language report and clarity score emailed to you. Of course, if you want the ultimate features, you’ll definitely have to pay for them.

But Clarity Grader’s paid options runs hundreds of checks on your copy, including spell checking, broken link checking and consistency checks. Plus, there’s a free trial to figure out if you want to spend the dough on the premium features for this nifty proofreader.

Jargon Grader

If you’re more worried about relying too hard on jargon, Jargon Grader is a free web-based service without many bells or whistles. Just paste the concerning text into the text box and it’ll run checks and highlight which words detract from your writing. Jargon Grader also reminds you “that some over-used words may be acceptable in context.” A quick run through Jargon Grader, and you’ll be zapping all your buzzwords in no time.

Hemingway Editor

Hemingway Editor isn’t just for fiction writers. Another free web-based service, Hemingway Editor helps you emulate the bold and concise style of Ernest Hemingway. It flags words and phrases for readability, passive voice and conciseness. Hemingway Editor even highlights adverbs to keep you crystal clear.

If you’re trying to make a sale, web copy shouldn’t hedge or hide under lots of needless words. Run your words through Hemingway Editor and be bold.

Grammarly

The Big Daddy of web and desktop free-mium apps, Grammarly is a must for any small or solo enterprise. Grammarly does seemingly countless grammatical, spelling and clarity checks on what you write. It does paywall some of the clarity features, but by cobbling together all the other services plus free Grammarly, you should be covered.

And, bonus, the extension can be installed in almost every facet of your business (email, web-browser, phone apps). That means no one will be confused by how your website reads crystal clear and how your emails read like a ransom note.

So whether you’re a broker trying to save coin or an army-of-one real estate tech freelancer, arm yourself with a few nifty tech tools, and you’ll start improving your lead generation efforts.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Marketing

Are iBuyers actually beneficial to Realtors!?

(REAL ESTATE MARKETING) IBuyers buy and sell homes quick, which seems bad but after a careful look realtors have no real qualms and they may actually help in the end.

Published

on

iBuyers dream

With so many i-themed Apple products (iPhone, iPad…etc), iBuyers sure sound like yet another addition to the Apple lineup. Instead, it’s a common term used in real estate: iBuyer actually stands for “instant buyer.” An iBuyer is a person or company that uses technology to quickly buy a home, typically with the intent to resell that home for a profit.

Thanks to technology, iBuyers can move fast, especially when they’re not deliberating over a home the way a client might. In fact, iBuyers leverage their speedy purchase with homeowners eager to sell, often purchasing a home at cheaper than it might have otherwise been worth. Essentially, sales to an iBuyer often prioritize time over profit.

Laura Brady, CEO of Concierge Auctions, has been watching alternative home selling/buying options –including iBuying – since 2005. According to Brady, there are four major reasons why people might want to unload a home quickly: death, divorce, debt or disaster. Sellers undergoing one (or more) of these events might be more partial to selling to an iBuyer.

While iBuyers might seem like a growing threat to Realtors®, Brady disagrees. Currently, not a single iBuyer company has profited from the system. In fact, less than one percent of homes in 2018 were sold by iBuyers. As technology advances, there might be growth, but even then, Brady projects that iBuyers will still only make up around 10 – 15% of the market.

In fact, not only are Realtors® safe from having their job overtaken by iBuyers, Brady believes real estate agents can actually use iBuyers to their advantage. Not only could a faster buy be appealing to certain individuals, but it could create a more efficient work system for agents, allowing them to take on more clients.

It might not be a fancy new Apple gadget, but iBuying is certainly out to make lives more convenient. Only time will tell if the phenomenon will grow to become a regular facet of the housing economy. In the meantime, iBuyers can be a boon to anyone hoping to buy or sell a home quickly without posing a significant threat to Realtors®.

“At the end of the day,” Brady explains, “this business is about achieving our client’s goals as efficiently and effectively as possible.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Parnters

Get The Daily Intel
in your inbox

Subscribe and get news and EXCLUSIVE content to your email inbox!

Still Trending

Get The American Genius
in your inbox

subscribe and get news and exclusive content to your email inbox