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FBI issues warning regarding vulnerabilities and car hacking

The latest technology in our automobiles keeps us safer and offers added convenience, but do the risks of this technology outweigh the rewards?

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Tech updates increasing vulnerability

When my old car finally quit, the only “special” thing I wanted in my new-to-me car was a CD player. Technology has come a long way in the past ten years, but I still have the car with the CD player. However, I also use a FM transmitter to play my iPhone through the speakers. Newer cars come with a whole host of features aimed at keeping us safer and simplifying our lives through Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and more, but do the vulnerabilities and risks of these features, outweigh the rewards?

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The FBI weighs in

The FBI along with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, have issued a safety bulletin addressing concerns that vehicles are being targeted more and more by hackers. While the latest issues of this have been resolved, they do want to make consumers and manufacturers aware of the potential problems. They stated in the bulletin: “The FBI and NHTSA are warning the general public and manufacturers of vehicles, vehicle components, and aftermarket devices to maintain awareness of potential issues and cybersecurity threats related to connected vehicle technologies in modern vehicles.”

Where are the vulnerabilities?

You may have heard about one of the more recent issues concerning the testing of the radio module. In August of 2015, a study [PDF] was published regarding researchers testing, targeting, and exploiting this particular device through attacking the vehicle through Wi-Fi and cellular connections. The radio module contained multiple wireless communication and entertainment functions and was connected to two controller area network (CAN) buses in the vehicle. Through their testing, researchers were able to shutdown the engine, disable the brakes and steering, trigger the door locks and turn signals, manipulate the tachometer, radio, HVAC, and GPS.

Vulnerabilities may exist within a vehicle’s wireless communication functions, within a mobile device – such as a cellular phone or tablet connected to the vehicle via USB, Bluetooth, or Wi-Fi – or within a third-party device connected through a vehicle diagnostic port. In these cases, it may be possible for an attacker to remotely exploit these vulnerabilities and gain access to the vehicle’s controller network or to data stored on the vehicle. Although vulnerabilities may not always result in an attacker being able to access all parts of the system, the safety risk to consumers could increase significantly if the access involves the ability to manipulate critical vehicle control systems.

Worried? Here’s 5 ways to minimize the chances of being hacked

1. Ensure your vehicle software is up to date: If your manufacturer issues a notification to update, it’s important that you do, but, verify that the update is genuine. Verify any recall or update notices by visiting your car’s manufacturer website. Clicking through emailed links presents the opportunity for hackers to send malicious links. Also, be wary of receiving USB and SD cards via the mail. Hackers could use this method to introduce malicious software into your car. Instead, check on your vehicle’s manufacturer’s website to identify the latest software updates. Use your own USB or SD card where necessary to download and transfer information. You can always check with your dealer or manufacturer before updating.

2. Be careful when making any modifications to vehicle software: Unauthorized updates could create increased vulnerabilities and change the way your car works.

3. Maintain awareness and exercise discretion when connecting third-party devices to your vehicle: Most modern vehicles have a standardized diagnostic port (OBD-II), which provides connectivity to the in-vehicle communication. Keeping these third-party devices secure is critical as a hacker may target them remotely as a way into your other systems. Do not connect any unknown or untrusted devices to the OBD-II port.

4. Be aware of who has physical access to the vehicle: Treat your vehicle the same way you do an unlocked smartphone, or computer: you don’t let people you don’t know touch it. Be cautious of who you leave your vehicle with; it only takes a few moments to upload hacking software.

Improving cyber security

While there are risks with using any technology, you want to be especially mindful of your automotive technology. The last thing anyone wants is to lose control of your vehicle. While the chances of this are minimal, you can decrease them even further by being actively aware of whom you leave your car with, your surroundings, and your technology system.

The rewards of technology outweigh the risks, especially when you consider the increased safety benefits of advanced technology; however, there is always a chance someone will turn this technology to their advantage. The NHTSA is actively working on initiatives to improve cyber security in vehicles.

To increase your security, please, follow the FBI’s tips above, or you can reach out to local law enforcement and the FBI with questions and concerns via the Internet Crime Complaint Center, or file a complaint with them.

#ProtectingYourSmartCar

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Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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The semantic argument of the phrase ‘Full Stack’

(TECH NEWS) As the tech industry knows, being able to classify your job qualifications is paramount.

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Semantics

A new debate is emerging in the web development world and it’s not about which framework is best, or which language is most marketable.

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In fact the debate isn’t a matter of code, it’s a matter of words.

It’s Not Just About Experience Level

“Full Stack Developer” is the title developers both new and old often use to describe themselves. According to a Stack Overflow developer survey touted as the “most comprehensive developer survey conducted” the title is among the top five respondents used to describe themselves.

However, not everyone thinks newer developers should adopt the title.

It would be easy to distill the debate to a matter of experience level, veterans earned the “full stack” title, while newer programmers haven’t. However, there’s way more layers to this debate.

What Exactly is Full Stack

First of all, a simple google search reveals several different definitions of “full stack.” There’s general consensus when it comes to the high-level definition. CodeUp sums up this definition, “The term full stack means developers who are comfortable working with both back-end and front-end technologies.”

When it comes down to the nitty-gritty of what exactly falls under back-end and front-end, there’s some disagreement.

Mastery level also matters, but again there’s disagreement over what’s acceptable. In one camp, are the proficiency pushers who require not only a breadth of understanding, but also a depth of understanding in multiple areas.

In this camp, it’s not just good enough to have exposure to SQL, one must have proficiency in SQL.

In the other camp, are the generalist. They also require a breadth of knowledge, but are happy with a basic familiarity of each stack element. When it comes to debating whether newer developers should adopt the full stack title, the lack of clarity on what full stack means in the first place is a major stumbling block.

Why Full Stack?

Besides clarifying the what behind “full stack” some folks are also clarifying the why. According to Indeed’s job trends, the number of postings and searches matching “full stack developer” on average has trended upwards since 2012 . The title’s popularity causes some to believe that new developers are adopting the title as a buzzword with no real care put into understanding what “full stack” means.

Android Programmer Dan Kim from Basecamp warns, “Just don’t fall back to labeling yourself with a bullshit buzzword that everyone else uses.”

For others, adopting the full stack title is a matter of mindset. As Web developer Christian Maioli over at TechBeacon writes: “To me, a full stack developer is someone who has the curiosity and drive to test the limits of a technology and understand how each piece works generally in various scenarios. Having this mindset will give developers more value and more power in dealing with new situations.”

In both cases, understanding why a new developer adopts the full stack title is connected to understanding whether they’re overselling their skills and how valuable their skills are to a potential employer.

Beyond Job Titles

Finally, this debate about whether new developers should use the “full stack” title brings up the need for alternative methods of measuring proficiency. This need isn’t limited to the web development world, as technology innovates job titles become convoluted.

A job title won’t be the most reliable way to communicate what you bring to a job or what you expect.Click To Tweet

Quantifying what you’ve accomplished in the past, along with what tools you used will be critical in a time where job titles aren’t trusted.

This story was first published here on April 7, 2017.

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We’ve all seen job listings for UX writers, but what exactly is UX writing?

(TECH NEWS) We seeing UX writer titles pop up and while UX writing is not technically new, there are new availabilities popping up.

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The work of a UX writer is something you come across everyday. Whether you’re hailing an Uber or browsing Spotify for that one Drake song, your overall user experience is affected by the words you read at each touchpoint.

A UX writer facilitates a smooth interaction between user and product at each of these touchpoints through carefully chosen words.

Some of the most common touchpoints UX writers work on are interface copy, emails and notifications. It doesn’t sound like the most thrilling stuff, but imagine using your favorite apps without all the thoughtful confirmation messages we take for granted. Take Eat24’s food delivery app, instead of a boring loading visual, users get a witty message like “smoking salmon” or “slurping noodles.”

Eat24’s app has UX writing that works because it’s engaging.

Xfinity’s mobile app provides a pleasant user experience by being intuitive. Shows that are available on your phone are clearly labeled under “Available Out of Home.” I’m bummed that Law & Order: SVU isn’t available, but thanks to thoughtful UX writing at least I knew that sad fact ahead of time.

Regardless of where you find a UX writer’s work, there are three traits an effective UX writer must have. Excellent communication skills is a must. The ability to empathize with the user is on almost every job post.

But from my own experience working with UX teams, I’d argue for the ability to advocate as the most important skill.

UX writers may have a very specialized mission, but they typically work within a greater UX design team. In larger companies some UX writers even work with a smaller team of fellow writers. Decisions aren’t made in isolation. You can be the wittiest writer, with a design decision based on obsessive user research, but if you can’t advocate for those decisions then what’s the point?

I mentioned several soft skills, but that doesn’t mean aspiring UX writers can’t benefit from developing a few specific tech skills. While the field doesn’t require a background in web development, UX writers often collaborate with engineering teams. Learning some basic web development principles such as responsive design can help writers create a better user experience across all devices. In a world of rapid prototyping, I’d also suggest learning a few prototyping apps. Several are free to try and super intuitive.

Now that the UX in front of writer no longer intimidates you, go check out ADJ, The American Genius’ Facebook Group for Austin digital job seekers and employers. User centered design isn’t going anywhere and with everyone getting into the automation game, you can expect even more opportunities in UX writing.

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Loopy is the new easy tool that helps explain hard ideas

(TECH NEWS) Loopy is a tool that can revolutionize how we explain anything from personal ideas to business complexities.

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In a world filled with complex systems, Loopy serves as a tool for people to take their time understanding them.

The tool allows users to create interactive simulations to help people explain their ways of thinking.

Loopy has found a way for people to interact with simulations without complicated code or overused drag and drop. You can create your own or collaborate with other simulations already made on the site.

It is a great way to challenge yourself while learning how each system works.

Loopy encourages you to ask hypothetical questions to better understand the systems. The model consists of circles and arrows to remain uncomplicated. When you remix or interact with simulations that were made by other users, it is as if you are having a conversation via the simulations. Loopy describes this as “talking in systems” which makes the entire experience more impactful.

Though Loopy can be used as a fun way to exercise your brain, it also has practical implications. For instance, simulations can be embedded into blog posts, live lectures and presentations. You can also develop videos to further explain complex ideas.

This is especially useful for businesses who want to simplify their models when communicating with investors and consumers.

Simulations can be a fun way to illustrate your thoughts and support your ideas. Businesses can use Loopy to create collaborative activities for their employees to mess around with as well.

The best part is that anyone can try it out for free. On their site, you can develop your own simulations or adjust ones that have already been made.

At its core, Loopy is simulation software.

However, their goal is to give everyone the tools that they need to understand complex systems. This goes for both the creators and the viewers, who are all a part of the process.

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