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The absolute worst passwords you can use and how to choose a better one

SplashData released their yearly list of most common passwords and it seems as though the horrible classics are still in use.

password

password

Your password might suck

As 2015 gets into full swing, the wrap-ups of 2014 are fading out. Among them, is a list of the worst passwords of this past year and it seems as though the horrible classics are still in use. With everything requiring a password, it is tough to come up with a code/variation of a code to keep up with all of your accounts. However, there are better options than “1234.”

SplashData released their yearly list of most common passwords on the Internet and offered the 25 most frequently used passwords throughout the World Wide Web. It seems as though numbers, superheroes, and the infamous “qwerty” are the hot contenders. The list was acquired from analyzing 3.3 million leaked passwords in 2014.

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Mark Burnett, an online security expert, helped SplashData compile their list and says that the list shows people are becoming more aware of better password usage than they have been in years prior. He also mentioned that the top 25 only accounts for 2.2 percent of the exposed passwords.

worstpasswords

We’re vulnerable online, but you can do something about it

The full list includes:

  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345
  4. 12345678
  5. qwerty
  6. 1234567890
  7. 1234
  8. baseball
  9. dragon
  10. football
  11. 1234567
  12. monkey
  13. letmein
  14. abc123
  15. 111111
  16. mustang
  17. access
  18. shadow
  19. master
  20. michael
  21. superman
  22. 696969
  23. 123123
  24. batman
  25. trustno1

With continuous proof of our online privacy being extremely vulnerable, it is important to create passwords that will protect you. While there is a fine-line between astoundingly easy and incredibly fool-proof (i.e. the time that I got an e-mail saying someone in Russia tried to hack my Gmail account so I changed my password to a 50-word phrase and have been regretting it ever since), coming up with a safe password may be easier than you think.

Choose a proper password

For example, base your password on something you like. Say you’re a fan of The Rolling Stones. You can make the band your theme for passwords and change up the variation depending on security requirements. You can do: rollingstones1, Rolling1Stones, YouCantAlwaysGetWhatYouWant, etc. If you have a theme for passwords, it may be easier for you to keep track of what goes where.

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However this may still be tricky to keep track of and further assistance may be required. For this, I would suggest the use of LastPass. It is a free, online tool that allows you to store all of your passwords in one password-protected place. LastPass also offers “Enterprise” which is password security for a company.

Whichever route you choose, know that it is possible to keep yourself safe on the Internet. And let us all make a pact to eliminate the usage of “1234” and “qwerty”.

More viewing (a bonus TED talk!):

#CrappyPasswords

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Staff Writer, Taylor Leddin is a publicist and freelance writer for a number of national outlets. She was featured on Thrive Global as a successful woman in journalism, and is the editor-in-chief of The Tidbit. Taylor resides in Chicago and has a Bachelor in Communication Studies from Illinois State University.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Hitoshi Anatomi

    March 13, 2015 at 2:29 am

    Using a strong password does help a lot even against the attack of cracking the leaked/stolen hashed passwords back to the original passwords. The problem is that few of us can firmly remember many such strong passwords.? It is like we cannot run as fast and far as horses however strongly urged we may be. We are not built like horses.

    At the root of the password headache is the cognitive phenomena called “interference of memory”, by which we cannot firmly remember more than 5 text passwords on average. What worries us is not the password, but the textual password. The textual memory is only a small part of what we remember. We could think of making use of the larger part of our memory that is less subject to interference of memory. More attention could be paid to the efforts of expanding the password system to include images, particularly KNOWN images, as well as conventional texts.

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