Connect with us

Tech News

Why UX is critical: every $1 invested in UX yields a $2 to $100 return

(Tech News) User experience (UX) is an often neglected part of a puzzle, with many execs thinking it just makes things pretty, but it means so much more to the bottom line than many know.

Published

on

ux

User Experience is more critical than most think

User Experience (UX) is an often neglected step in the design process of technology companies, yet is a tremendous part of how a consumer connects technically and emotionally with an app or software.

Web-based software application design firm, UpTop‘s Chief Creative Strategist, Charlie Claxton is focused heavily on the impact of great UX design and conversion strategy on business success, having led design efforts for companies like Amazon, Boeing, Expedia, and Microsoft.

Claxton notes, If you’re wondering about the power and value of user experience design, let me offer one of those statistics that makes you blink and read it twice to make sure you’re not seeing things. Every dollar invested in UX yields a return between $2 and $100. Let me repeat it another way: UX yields a return between $2 and $100 on every dollar invested.”

bar
Noting that this research first surfaced in Tom Gilb’s 1988 book, Principles of Software Engineering Management, Claxton asserts that the stat is even more relevant today than when the book was released, particularly because of the importance of ecommerce in today’s retail environment.

Claxton notes, “Yet what’s nearly as surprising as that one statistic is the number of companies and entrepreneurs that still consider UX design as icing on the cake, a “nice to have” discipline instead of a “must-have.”
Enlightened retailers know better. They understand that UX design is an important, valuable business tool that delivers specific, quantifiable return on investment. They don’t need to be reminded that you hire UX design experts to improve your bottom line, not simply to make things pretty.”

He offers in his own words below, two common examples of how great user-centered design can help your bottom line:

  • An ecommerce web site has to perform well at every level. It must be fast and reliable, yet incorporate attractive, logical design and navigation that enables visitors to easily find what they are looking for. It makes buying (or whatever ultimate goal you’ve set for them) both tempting and easy. They come, they stay and they buy … and their experience is reflected in your gross revenues and profit margin.
  • A UX-driven business intelligence dashboard that corrals information in a clear, inviting way on the back-end makes it easy for people in varied roles and locations to find and use it. It saves time and makes employees far more productive and strategic.

Claxton closes with the note that if you’re considering your company’s success, the importance of UX design cannot be overlooked. “After all, what successful business person wouldn’t want to invest in a tool that at the very least generates a dollar of profit for every dollar you spent?”

The American Genius is news, insights, tools, and inspiration for business owners and professionals. AG condenses information on technology, business, social media, startups, economics and more, so you don’t have to.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
19 Comments

19 Comments

  1. Pingback: The List | Business Resource Kit

  2. Pingback: Online shopping increasingly popular, here are the freshest stats - AGBeat

  3. Pingback: Seeflo: watch videos of how people interact with your site - The American Genius

  4. Pingback: Covintus

  5. Pingback: Five Huge Reasons to Get Your UX Right the First Time - Covintus

  6. Pingback: What the Sistine Chapel can teach us about customer experience - SapientNitro APAC

  7. Pingback: What the Sistine Chapel can teach us about customer experience | Sapient

  8. Pingback: Design and UX trends that actually boost conversion rates - The American Genius

  9. Pingback: 7 Compelling Reasons Why Your Business Needs to Care about UX – Triploma

  10. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers | | Graficstudio

  11. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers - p6design.net

  12. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers – Graphic Design | Digital Marketing

  13. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers - Webdesign Journal

  14. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers - WebRecital.com

  15. Pingback: Here are some things website developers can learn from web designers | CleanCoded.com

  16. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers – Rezal Labs

  17. Pingback: What web designers can learn from web developers | Wp Stories | All About WordPress - WP Stories

  18. Pingback: When To Hire A UX/UI Designer?

  19. Pingback: 53 Web & UX Design Statistics You Can’t Ignore: 2019 Data Analysis & Market Share – Bitcoin Chequer

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech News

Making Slack actionable makes you productive

(TECHNOLOGY) Slack is an amazing productivity tool, but of course can add more to your plate – this feature puts you back on track.

Published

on

slack

You know when you’re using Slack and you’re having a conversation with your teammate about whether or not you should grab lunch or go to Soul Cycle, but before you can answer, your editor Slacks you about deadlines and your design partner messages you proofs and suddenly you snap back to reality and remember that you’ve been working on a blog post for an hour and your concentration is completely shattered? You know, the exact moment when your productivity is officially derailed?

Well, Slack now offers Actions to help make sure that doesn’t happen. Your day may get busy, but at least nothing will slip through the cracks, work-wise.

Integrated with project management tools like Asana, Zendesk, and Jira, Actions allows users to create and comment on tasks, tickets or issues within conversations. That means no clicking through tabs or apps until you can no longer remember why you started clicking in the first place. More importantly, Actions keeps track of the work you need to do and when you need to do it.

So, how do Actions work?

1. Need to create a deadline or set up an appointment? Anything you see in Slack that needs a follow-up can be turned into an action when you click the ••• icon and choose an “action.”

2. When you’ve completed an action, a message appears in your Slack channel and lets your team know you’ve flagged it for follow-up.

3. Whichever app you’ve integrated with will alert Slack at which point you and your team can determine the next steps.

Bottom-line, Actions help keep your workflow moving. While it may not stop the onslaught of Slack messages from breaking your concentration, at least you’ll know what you should to be concentrating on.

If you’re curious to know more about Actions, the company has ample info on their API pages for your perusal.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Freezetab streamlines how you save tabs in Chrome

(TECH NEWS) Freezetab is the newest chrome extension that allows you to organize saved tabs in a myriad of ways.

Published

on

freezetab

Internet made easier

With the browser becoming more and more of a workspace than merely an application, the built in bookmarks tool may leave you a bit hungry for more.

bar
Chrome users who need better tools to organize and manage bookmarks may find the power they need in Freezetab.

Bookmark’s cooler, hotter younger brother

Freezetab seeks to answer the questions of “what if I could organize my bookmarks by website” or “I only want to save all but two of these tabs on zen office designs.” It seeks to give you more options beyond the “one or all” choices in chrome. Here is the lowdown:

  • The calendar feature remembers WHEN you saved a tab – so if you can’t remember the title you can just go back to the day.
  • Chrome either lets you save one or all tabs. Freezetab expands those options to include: all, current, everything but current, right of, left of, or pick and choose.
  • If you are sharing a collection of tabs with a workgroup or a partner, it exports as a nice textbox that is easy to share in integrated messaging, IM, or email. Or even social media!
  • Sorting is robust, and there is a solid search feature that searches as you type.
  • That quick save feature saves all the tabs and closes them – and you can adjust that quick save feature to meet your needs.
  • There is a handy little star feature to note important bookmarks (i.e. recipes and excel techniques).
  • Enhances your close tab capability to close everything to the left and specific tabs – this great if you work in chrome and have 75 tabs open that have one letter names.
  • It is easier to sort tabs after you save them – you can search for them and then sort into folders you create rather manually organizing them into folders.
  • As a bonus: for those who don’t want to have to sort bookmarks – unlike Chrome which requires you to pick a folder or risk turning your bookmarks to an unorganized mess, the extension automatically organizes it for you.

Freezetab findings

After spending a few moments with Freezetab, it does fit in nicely with a workflow. Solidly reviewed, the developer did solve an issue with “pinned” tabs in the 1.2 update. – so it doesn’t remove or add them. The features are nice and easy to use, and it doesn’t require more than five minutes of playing around.

One complaint – if you choose to the right or left of the current tab to close, it did close the active tab as well – which was a little funky. But once you get comfortable with the nuances, it’s easy to use.
The interface is function over form, but you won’t have any problem using or customizing this extension. Now Bookmark smart y’all!

#FreezeTab

Continue Reading

Tech News

We’ve all seen job listings for UX writers, but what exactly is UX writing?

(TECH NEWS) We seeing UX writer titles pop up and while UX writing is not technically new, there are new availabilities popping up.

Published

on

writers net neutrality twitter facebook outlook email drag

The work of a UX writer is something you come across everyday. Whether you’re hailing an Uber or browsing Spotify for that one Drake song, your overall user experience is affected by the words you read at each touchpoint.

A UX writer facilitates a smooth interaction between user and product at each of these touchpoints through carefully chosen words.

Some of the most common touchpoints UX writers work on are interface copy, emails and notifications. It doesn’t sound like the most thrilling stuff, but imagine using your favorite apps without all the thoughtful confirmation messages we take for granted. Take Eat24’s food delivery app, instead of a boring loading visual, users get a witty message like “smoking salmon” or “slurping noodles.”

Eat24’s app has UX writing that works because it’s engaging.

Xfinity’s mobile app provides a pleasant user experience by being intuitive. Shows that are available on your phone are clearly labeled under “Available Out of Home.” I’m bummed that Law & Order: SVU isn’t available, but thanks to thoughtful UX writing at least I knew that sad fact ahead of time.

Regardless of where you find a UX writer’s work, there are three traits an effective UX writer must have. Excellent communication skills is a must. The ability to empathize with the user is on almost every job post.

But from my own experience working with UX teams, I’d argue for the ability to advocate as the most important skill.

UX writers may have a very specialized mission, but they typically work within a greater UX design team. In larger companies some UX writers even work with a smaller team of fellow writers. Decisions aren’t made in isolation. You can be the wittiest writer, with a design decision based on obsessive user research, but if you can’t advocate for those decisions then what’s the point?

I mentioned several soft skills, but that doesn’t mean aspiring UX writers can’t benefit from developing a few specific tech skills. While the field doesn’t require a background in web development, UX writers often collaborate with engineering teams. Learning some basic web development principles such as responsive design can help writers create a better user experience across all devices. In a world of rapid prototyping, I’d also suggest learning a few prototyping apps. Several are free to try and super intuitive.

Now that the UX in front of writer no longer intimidates you, go check out ADJ, The American Genius’ Facebook Group for Austin digital job seekers and employers. User centered design isn’t going anywhere and with everyone getting into the automation game, you can expect even more opportunities in UX writing.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!