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ADJ

Humans of ADJ – we want to feature you

In honor of the famous photo essay project, Humans of New York, we’re tipping our hat and featuring Humans of ADJ (Austin Digital Jobs) to showcase how different yet similar we all are on this boat.

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The Austin Digital Jobs group (ADJ) celebrates the tremendous talent where we’re headquartered and boasts over 46,000 members (so far). We’re devoted to retaining talent in Austin and attracting new brands, and letting our hair down while we do it. We offer a quarterly mixer, cramming a venue full of the city’s most popular employers alongside highly qualified, eager talent.

To help us see what we have in common while simultaneously showcasing our diversity, we’re launching “Humans of ADJ” as a nod to the famous photo essay project, “Humans of New York.” We’d like to feature you, but first, let’s talk more about this lil’ project!

WHO – if you’re a member of our rowdy Facebook Group, you’re eligible. It’s that easy. Whether you’re job hunting or seeking talent, we want to tell your story!

WHAT – instead of a photo essay, for now, we’ll be focusing on stories and long-form interviews. The goal is to learn more about each other as humans. We want to showcase things less obvious about ourselves – a game developer who plays professional rugby, a digital marketing strategist who has lived in 12 countries, a UX pro who served 23 years in the Navy, a technical writer who is currently fostering 12 animals and bottle feeding 5… you get the idea.

We are more than our job titles. Every single one of us. We sincerely seek to demonstrate the uniqueness of folks in this town in hopes that we can connect with each other more meaningfully.

WHEN – our goal is to profile one member each week on this website, and we’ll share it and put out a call in the Group weekly as well.

We won’t be able to feature every single applicant, but we’ll do our best – we’d be honored to feature you! We believe the responses may be voluminous, so please give us time to respond!

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The American Genius - she has co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

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ADJ

ADJ AMA: Ask the Recruiter Anything [replay]

If you missed the live session last week, the ADJ AMA was bonkers – we learned so much and our guest debunked a LOT of “common knowledge!”

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If you weren’t able to make the live event, there’s good news – we recorded it for you!

Michele Olivier is a partner at O&H Consulting which offers recruiting and career coaching services. She’s a vetted badass and blew my mind in so many ways during the hour and a half we spent together.

Apparently a lot of what I’ve been told is wrong, which means a lot of what you have been told is also wrong!

We chat about the application robots, recruiters, how it all works, and how it has all changed. Get up to speed by listening to the AMA (Ask Me Anything), but beware – there are curse words, so maybe listen with headsphones on!

Pro tip: Michele’s bio and social media links are all listed below the video!

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Michele Olivier offers a unique perspective on career development and job searching, with an impressive record of accomplishment on both sides of the desk. She combines over 20 years of experience in HR and recruitment with certifications in career guidance and counseling, and she knows how to meet the needs of both applicants and organizations when it comes to matching talented people with top jobs. As a regular contributor to trusted sources for industry knowledge including the New York Times, Recruitment.com, and Refinery29 Michele is a dynamic thought leader and instrument of change in the Talent Acquisition field.

With global expertise and a list of clients including Big 4, Big Tech, and F50 companies, Michele has recruited at all levels from entry retail through executive. Not only has she filled roles for household names like Microsoft, EA Games, Facebook, and the YMCA, she has worked individually with established professionals to land positions at places from Goldman Sachs to the American Red Cross.

The scope of Michele’s experience spans multiple industries, every career level, and organizations of all sizes. Through this, she has honed a no-nonsense approach when it comes to communicating with clients about the realities of the job market and how to stay competitive. She has even developed and implemented curricula to help both job seekers find work and employers identify talent, which was rolled out internationally and recognized by the British Parliament for excellence. As Principal Consultant with O&H Consulting, Michele and her colleagues channel their expertise into customized resume and career coaching support that helps clients soar above the crowd.

Find Michele online:

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ADJ

Coming up – an AMA all about making a career change!

ADJ is hosting an AMA for anyone thinking about making a career change, especially into the technology sector!

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We get questions alllll the time about how to make a career change. Folks are worried they’re too young, they’re too old, they’re too experienced, too inexperienced.

They’re worried they can’t transition from the military to civilian life, from being a teacher to tech, from owning a business to working for someone else again.

Others have questions about moving from individual contributor to manager, and others want to know how to break through to the next level.

Bring your questions and join us on August 31st at 7:00pm cst (snacks, drinks, and pets are welcomed)!

Register now to snag the Zoom link!

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ADJ

Rooftop Slushie sells employee referrals (aka bribes), and we hate it

At last, the sharing economy is addressing the issue of nepotistic hiring practices in tech… by making it worse. And adding a bit of immorality. We suspect that Rooftop Slushie is a fast way for you to land in hot water.

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Introducing Rooftop Slushie, a website that emerged last year and has gained popularity in the absence of face-to-face networking events brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The company sells recommendations on behalf of those seeking jobs at major tech companies, including Google, Facebook and Microsoft. As of now, Rooftop Slushie proudly claims on their website to have referred over 13,000 candidates.

Here’s how it works: users pay between $20-$50 to upload resumes and indicate their desired position. Anonymous tech employees evaluate them, then decide whether or not to refer candidates based on their listed credentials. They also offer resume reviews and career advice.

It is a recent venture from the enigmatic creators of Blind, an anonymous online forum of vaguely described “verified professionals.” (How someone can be both verified and anonymous is beyond me, but I digress.)

While Rooftop Slushie asks their employee network to only recommend candidates who are genuinely qualified for their desired positions, the site has no apparent measures to ensure that this happens, other than there being no guarantee that any given applicant will succeed.

It is true that Rooftop is providing a unique service. Nobody else is doing what they do, because what they do is wrong. It would be questionable even if there was no money exchanged. As it is, this is akin to bribery.

The keyholders of these prestigious tech job references are taking advantage of their status within large companies for profit, as well as any additional incentives to refer candidates that their employer may offer. It’s friggin’ corrupt, plain and simple.

Now, I’d like to address those who would consider using this service to land their dream job.

I understand that impulse, especially in this economically desperate moment. But ethics aside, think about the personal consequences you could face.

What if word gets out that you bought your way into your coveted new position?

You and your reference would probably be canned immediately. You could lose trust with your friends and associates, business or otherwise, who hear the news as well.

This is not a hypothetical question. Amazon has already started cracking down on paid referrals, and others are sure to follow suit. Good luck explaining that at your next interview.

It is also incredibly unfair to those of us who can’t gamble 50 bucks to get a foot in the door with Google.

We have to do it the old fashioned way (like some kind of peasant, I suppose). And look, the ”old fashioned way” is obviously flawed. There is a LOT to criticize about preferential and biased hiring practices in the tech industry. This attempt to solve it is still very misguided.

Blind claims to be a “platform for change,” and suggests that Rooftop opens up opportunities to people who don’t have insider connections, thus (supposedly) leveling the playing field.

But cheating only worsens the problems they describe. The hiring process should not be pay-to-win. Jobs aren’t commodities.

Whether or not the act of selling professional recommendations breaks an employee’s contract, it’s certainly a gross violation of the social contract.

If you believe you’re qualified for a particular position, but the company won’t give you the time of day, don’t cheat. Be persistent. Or, better yet, why not seek out an employer who recognizes your talents?

And if you can’t manage to do that… maybe it’s time to reevaluate your actual level of expertise.

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