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Bubbl ridesharing app: Drivers are former and off-duty officers

The Dallas ISD police Chief Craig Miller is building a business where he’s hiring off-duty and former police officers to drive people around in an Uber-like startup. Does this really ensure your safety?

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To protect, serve, and chauffeur

I want to say upfront that most of the police officers and law enforcement personnel that I’ve dealt with are very honest and trustworthy. I respect what they do wholeheartedly. That said, there is no way I believe that being a police officer makes someone inherently safe and credible. Why is this important? Because the Dallas ISD police Chief Craig Miller is building a business where he’s hiring off-duty and former police officers to drive people around in an Uber-like startup.

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“We’re going to bubble wrap your kid”

Miller’s new business will be called “Bubbl” as in bubble wrap. He told The Dallas Morning News that “We’re going to bubble wrap your kid,” and “Having a police officer as a driver reassures parents and gives them instant credibility for being safe and trustworthy.”

I applaud Miller for wanting to make ride-sharing safer. It is a big concern for parents who need to get their kids somewhere or women who might be traveling alone. Uber halted services in Austin because the voters didn’t approve a measure that would eliminate the fingerprint rule. I’m still a little confused why a business wouldn’t want to ensure the safety of their customers, but that’s for another article.

Are cops that much safer?

But I think although well intentioned, Miller’s missing a big point. I’m from Oklahoma, where Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw was sentenced to prison for 236 years for sexual assault of seven different women while on duty. There were even more allegations against him. He’s not an anomaly. According to a story from the AP in November 2015, reporters uncovered over 1,000 officers who had lost their badges in the previous six years for rape, sexual assault and sodomy.

What scares me even more? California and New York don’t even have a statewide system to track these cases.

It’s estimated that sexual assault crimes committed by police officers are underreported.

There’s a fear of retaliation with any crime, but when it comes to sexual crimes, the victim gets put on trial. Who is going to investigate crimes when off-duty police are involved?

Safety still not a guarantee

Miller has a great idea, but I’m not buying the whole idea that people are safer because the drivers are cops (and I wouldn’t send my child in a car alone with any stranger, law enforcement or not). I’m aware that there are more good cops than bad ones. But the bad ones scare the heck out of me. They’re already in a position of authority to cover up their crimes.

I applaud the effort, it’s a positive step in the right direction, it helps with the safety factor, but I’m stuck thinking about how Miller can ensure that potential victims feel safe to come forward? Bubbl sounds good, but it has the same issues as every other ride-sharing service. The bad apples can still get through.

#Bubbl

Dawn Brotherton is a Staff Writer at The American Genius, and has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Central Oklahoma. Before earning her degree, she spent over 20 years homeschooling her two daughters, who are now out changing the world. She lives in Oklahoma and loves to golf. She hopes to publish a novel in the future.

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. BW

    July 14, 2016 at 12:56 pm

    Good for you Miller, I would much rather hire a cop that has had an extensive 6 month background check and would have been fingerprinted than some stranger per say that had not.

  2. RM

    August 27, 2016 at 12:19 pm

    This is what Uber background check looks back 7 at these records:
    1-County courthouse records for every county of residence for the last 7 years
    2-Federal courthouse records going back 7 years
    3-The multi-state criminal database going back 7 years
    4-Motor Vehicle Records
    4-Social Security Trace
    5-National Sex Offender Registry
    So it’s pretty easy become an Uber driver.

    Not to become the Dallas police officer you have the following to go through.
    1-preliminary Interview.
    2- civil service test
    3- pre-polygraph exam
    4-physical fitness test
    5-final polygraph exam
    6-applicant interview board
    7-background investigation goes back to the age of 17
    8-psychological examination
    9-medical examination
    10-Final review board
    11-30+ page background packet that needs to be completed
    12-35 weeks for police academy
    13-24 weeks of field training
    it’s very hard to become a police officer and just about anybody can become Uber driver.

  3. Joe

    September 20, 2016 at 7:22 pm

    A FBI finger print check for rider share drivers in San Antonio is free from the SAPD, and it is illegal to carry anyone under 18 yo with Uber and Lyft
    It looks like a great ideal up in Dallas

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Opinion Editorials

I just got furloughed. Now what?

(EDITORIAL) Some companies are furloughing employees, betting on their company’s long-term recovery. Here’s what you can expect and should plan for in your furlough.

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furloughed woman

Are you furloughed? You are not alone! What now? What does “furlough” even mean? How will I get money? Will I still keep my insurance?

A furlough differs from a layoff in a few ways. Whereas a layoff means you are definitely unemployed, a furlough is at its core unpaid time off. Not all furloughs are created equal, though the basic concept is the same: to keep valued employees on ice without being on the hook for their pay until a financial turnaround occurs.

The good-ish news is that a furlough means the company wants to keep you available. When a company is unable to pay their employees for an extended (often indefinite, as is the case with COVID-19 closures) period, they may opt to furlough them instead of laying them off. This virus has decimated whole industries, at least temporarily.

Furloughed employees are forbidden by law to do so much as answer a work email or text while furloughed–or else the company must pay them. The first large waves of COVID-19 furloughs are in obvious sectors such as hospitality (Marriott International), airlines industries (Virgin Atlantic), though other industries are following suit with furloughs or layoffs.

Some furloughs may mean cutting employees’ hours/days to a minimum. Maybe you’re being asked to take off a couple days/week unpaid if you’re hourly, or one week/month off if you’re on salary. With the COVID-19 situation, though, many companies are furloughing bunches of employees by asking them not to work at all. This particular furlough will last ostensibly for a few months, or until business begins to bounce back, along with normal life.

So, what are your rights? Why would you wait for the company? Can you claim unemployment benefits? What about your other work benefits? I’d be lying if I said I knew all the answers, as the furlough packages differ from company to company, and the laws differ from state to state.

However, here are some broad truths about furloughs that should apply. I hope this information helps you sort through your options. I feel your pain, truly. It’s a tough time all around. I’m on your side.

The first answer people want to know is yes, if you’re furloughed and have lost all or most of your income, you may apply for unemployment benefits. You can’t be expected to live off of thin air. Apply IMMEDIATELY, as there is normally a one or two week wait period until the first check comes in. Don’t delay. Some states provide more livable unemployment benefits (I’m looking at you, Massachusetts) than others, but some income is better than none.

Also, most furloughed employees will likely continue to receive benefits. Typically, life and health insurance remain intact throughout the length of the furlough. This is one of the ways companies let their employees know they are serious about wanting them back as soon as it’s financially realistic. Yet some other benefits, like a matching 401k contribution, will go away, as without a paycheck, there are no contributions to match.

Should you look for a job in the interim? Can you really afford not to? What if the company goes belly up while you’re waiting? Nobody wants that to happen, but the reality is that it might.

If you absolutely love your job and the company you work for and feel fairly confident the furlough is truly short-lived, then look for a short-term job. Thousands upon thousands of positions have opened up to meet the needs of the COVID-19 economy, at grocery stores or Amazon, for example. You could also look for contract work. That way, when your company reopens the doors, you can return to your position while finishing off the contract work on the side.

If the company was on shaky ground to begin with, keep that in mind when applying to new jobs. A full-time, long-term position may serve you better. At the end of this global health and economic crisis, some industries will be slower to return to their former glory–if they ever do. If you’re furloughed from such an industry, you may want to shift to something else completely. Pivot, as they say. Now would be a good time.

The only exceptions are “Excepted” government workers in essential positions, including public health and safety. They would have to work while furloughed in case of a government shutdown (and did previously).

Furloughs are scary, but they offer a greater measure of security than a layoff. They mean the company plans on returning to a good financial situation, which is encouraging. Furloughs also generally offer the comfort–and necessity–of insurance, which means you can breathe a bit easier while deciding your next move.

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Opinion Editorials

The cringe inducing and lesson learning tale of Poor Jennifer

(EDITORIAL) Video conferencing is becoming the norm, so make sure you don’t end up like poor Jennifer. Take some extra time and precautions against exposure.

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poor Jennifer

Ever had that bad dream where you were giving a speech, but realized you were totally naked? If so, you’ll join us in cringing at the true life tale of “Poor Jennifer.”

We are all Poor Jennifer. We love Poor Jennifer. We stand with Poor Jennifer. Take a deep breath and prepare to relate far too well to a story this mortifying. You’ll want to tell her you feel for her and perhaps even offer up your own embarrassing anecdotes to let her know she’s not alone. Jennifer’s story serves as the ultimate cautionary tale for Zoom calls.

Working from home is a luxury/burden that was still surprisingly rare until the COVID-19 crisis sent office workers home in droves. IT departments across the country–and across the world–scrambled to ensure they had solid firewalls and valid VPNs locked and loaded on everyone’s computer. Everyone signed up for video conferencing tools. Zoom became a household name overnight, though other options are available, too.

Nearly everyone’s reality has drastically changed over the past several weeks due to the novel coronavirus–and in some cases overnight. With this global pandemic comes uncertainty, anxiety, and dread, meaning few of us are working at our own full mental capacity. Many professionals find themselves working at home, using new tools, and with new, often rambunctious, noisy, or needy coworkers, AKA children, pets, or life partners. It can be jarring, disconcerting.

If you’re used to participating in conference calls in an office environment, whether video or audio, you take them at your desk. Working from home can tempt one to mute the audio call and do some multi-tasking. Nobody can see you or hear you once you mute the phone, after all, and not every part of every call is important for your particular piece of the puzzle.

I’m not proud of it, but I’ve walked the dog or loaded the dishwasher while I muted a conference call during another department’s report. It’s not ideal, but I have to tell you…it happens. I am thanking my lucky stars today that we kept video conferences to a bare minimum at work.

What does this have to do with Poor Jennifer? Well, Poor Jennifer was on a team video conference call when she answered another call: nature’s. Yikes. Zoom caught it all, and her colleagues’ faces told the story. We see confusion, discomfort, then disbelief. By the time one of her colleagues tries to tell her, she obviously already caught a glimpse of herself on the porcelain throne and took care of the problem.

The whole scenario was over practically before it began, yet it’s a moment that will live on forever, because one of Poor Jennifer’s inconsiderate coworkers went ahead and posted the Zoom feed online. NOT COOL, BRO. As for Poor Jennifer, please know we get it. The world is coming to a standstill, and this weighs heavy on our heads. Your accident serves as a warning to all of us coping with a strange new world. And yes, we laughed a little, awkwardly, because we were taken by surprise and felt uncomfortable for you.

Please know, Poor Jennifer, that it could happen to anyone. Know that we’re on your side. Know that we think your coworker is in the wrong 100% for posting it. Most importantly, know that any minute now, some other unsuspecting soul will unseat you from your internet throne of ignominy. This is the beauty of the internet and our ridiculously short attention spans.

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Opinion Editorials

How to combat the viral spread of COVID-19 anxieties

(EDITORIAL) As if work stress wasn’t enough, no work, with a viral pandemic sweeping the globe can be way worse. Here’s some tips to deal with COVID-19 related anxiety.

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stress overworked COVID-19

When the CDC has a page about managing anxiety and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, you know there’s a serious problem. The uncertainty of the situation is enough to put anyone in a tailspin, but when you add financial issues, health problems and social distancing, the stress can be overwhelming.

Fear, anxiety and panic are contagions just as dangerous and damaging as the COVID-19 virus. When you see other people panic-buying, it increases your stress level. When you act on it by shopping and stockpiling groceries, it doesn’t absolve your stress. It simply makes you even more stressed.

Anxiety is hard enough to deal with during normal times. During times of crisis, we have to be even more aware of our response to stress. It’s not that you can take away the stress. It’s about how you cope with stress. Unhealthy coping mechanisms include drinking too much, smoking, overworking and poor sleep habits.

How can you deal with anxiety during this time?

I’ve dealt with anxiety for years. When it’s gotten real bad, I’ve taken medication to help me find balance, but currently, I’m relying on what I’ve learned in therapy. When I start to spiral, I try to find ways that help me shut down my unhealthy responses.

  • I take it one moment at a time. Sometimes, that means only thinking about one hour or even the next 10 minutes. I try to remember that I can only control so much. What do I need to do to get through the day?
  • I am sticking to my schedule. I get up and make my bed. At the end of the day, I try to put work away. I keep lunch easy, just as if I were going to my co-working office. I clean up the kitchen before I go to bed. A routine is comforting for me and reduces my anxiety.
  • I’ve muted people on FB who are panicking. I’m also limiting my time on social media and the news. I believe nothing unless it is verified against a reliable source.
  • I work crosswords, but any activity that takes your mind off what’s going on in the world works.
  • I’ve made sure to connect with others. With some people, I’ve talked about my concerns. With others, I’ve tried to be lighthearted and talk about other things. No matter what, I’ve tried to make sure that I only share accurate information.
  • Try to find ways to get out of your four walls without violating any recommendations. Go for a drive. Sit outside on your patio. Play with your dog in the backyard.

We don’t know how long this situation will last. You’re going to have to deal with some stressful problems. Finding your calm in the midst of the storm will help you move forward instead of feeling paralyzed with fear.

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others call:

  • 911
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 or
  • Text TalkWithUs to 66746. (TTY 1-800-846-8517)

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