Connect with us

Opinion Editorials

Fyre Festival 2017 was a bust so organizers have decided to double down

(EDITORIAL) Fyre Festival was one of the most epic fails of 2017 and yet organizers are already gearing up for Fyre Festival 2018. Wait, what?!

Published

on

fyre

Not so common-sense

Let your word be your bond. Underpromise and overdeliver.

bar
Don’t be a party to fraud and be the cause of an emergency airlift.

Some learn the hard way

Some lessons in business were ingrained in us since we were little, and seem fairly obvious, even to the point of being trite. However, for the founders of the Fyre Festival, perhaps the reality check hasn’t quite sunk in: quit while you’re behind.

We’re all familiar by now with the abject failure that the inaugural Fyre Festival turned out to be; an elite concert and festival experience heavily promoted in Instagram (in posts that weren’t clearly labelled as sponsored) by Ja Rule, with tickets ranging from $1,500 to $250,000 each, for what was described as “an immersive music festival” on a “remote and private island.”

Festival-goers would be immersed in “the best in food, art, music, and adventure,” while sleeping in eco-friendly geodesic domes or even villas!

The first images that came from the Fyre Festival via Twitter were so starkly at odds with what was promised that they seemed more parody than reality.

Firestorm that was Fyre Festival

But real they were: for some flights were abruptly cancelled, leaving them stranded with no way to get to the island.

Those were the lucky ones.

For those who did make it, luggage was lost, the geodesic domes were survival tents, and the world class food was scarce and limited to cheese sandwiches. Reports of festivalgoers being locked in rooms, with attendant gunfire outside forced the Bahamian government to step in, and, with the aid of the United States Embassy, launch rescue efforts.

At least the promised musical acts were there to try to give the people some semblance of a good time, right? Nope. They were all no shows, with Blink-182 going so far as to issue a statement on the eve of the festival, saying that “[r]egrettably, and after much careful and difficult consideration, we want to let you know that we won’t be performing at Fyre Fest in the Bahamas this weekend and next weekend. We’re not confident that we would have what we need to give you the quality of performances we always give fans.”

Even Ja Rule, the 90’s rapper, who was a co-creator of the festival, was nowhere to be seen.

Help me, Ja. With backlash quickly mounting via social media, and the threat of lawsuits imminent, Ja Rule issued a statement to Rolling Stone, telling the magazine that refunds were going to be issued and that the festival “was not a scam.”

“We are working right now on getting everyone off the island safely; that is my immediate concern,” Ja Rule said, “I truly apologize as this is NOT MY FAULT … but I’m taking responsibility I’m deeply sorry to everyone who was inconvenienced by this.”

From the ground up

The problem, at least according to Fyre, was that despite their best efforts, planning and executing the logistics involved in creating a luxury experience in a remote setting was hard!

“Due to circumstances out of our control, the physical infrastructure was not in place on time and we are unable to fulfill on that vision safely and enjoyably for our guests,” Fyre initially posted on their website.

Since everyone has now gotten home safely, they have expanded on what those limitations to physical infrastructure were:

“As amazing as the islands are, the infrastructure for a festival of this magnitude needed to be built from the ground up,” Fyre wrote.

“So we decided to literally attempt to build a city. We set up water and waste management, brought an ambulance from New York, and chartered 737 planes to shuttle our guests via 12 flights a day from Miami. We thought we were ready, but then everyone arrived.”

“We thought we were ready, but then everyone arrived.”

It’s an old maxim that no good tactical plan survives the first seconds of combat without the need for being adapted, but this is a failure of even more epic proportions. It would be a great thing, dear reader, if we could spend the next few paragraphs discussing the need for not only tabletop planning down to the most miniscule details over and over, but also the need to be able to admit that you don’t know what you don’t know, and the need to align yourself with experts in those fields, even when they are giving you advice that you’d rather not hear.

But we can’t. We can’t for the simple reason that the failure of Fyre doesn’t stop there, but extends itself to their plans to make large charitable donations to the Bahamian Red Cross and—steady yourself now—start planning for Fyre Festival 2018.

Fyre 2018

“Venues, bands, and people started contacting us and said they’d do anything to make this festival a reality and how they wanted to help,” they posted on their website. “The support from the musical community has been overwhelming and we couldn’t be more humbled or inspired by this experience…People were rooting for us after the worst day we’ve ever had as a company. After speaking with our potential partners, we have decided to add more seasoned event experts to the 2018 Fyre Festival, which will take place at a United States beach venue.”

While there is a certain nobility rooted in failure, epic in scale though it may be, there is none in callously failing to plan, and then your failure to plan being the cause of emergency preparations needing to be taken.

Sometimes you have to know your limitations, and sometimes those limitations mean that you’re just not capable of doing what you set out to do.

There are all sorts of practical reasons why they feel the need to continue Fyre; well, at least hold a festival, anyway, beyond the visionary. With full refunds slated to go out, and a sizeable contribution going to charity, funds have to be raised to settle the lawsuits that have already been filed, with more surely to follow. Stopping now eliminates any hope of ever turning a profit, but that logic steadfastly fails.

We tried, we failed

While we’re hoping that they are going to benefit from the event experts that ostensibly know what the hell they’re doing, and have a greater pre-existing infrastructure in place by holding it in the continental United States, sometimes you have to be honest with yourself and your customer that you’re simply not capable of getting the job done.

As Ja Rule himself put it in “Strange Days”: “No me, no you, no us/ We tried, we failed…”

#Fyre

Roger is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds two Master's degrees, one in Education Leadership and another in Leadership Studies. In his spare time away from researching leadership retention and communication styles, he loves to watch baseball, especially the Red Sox!

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Teens are split on whether or not to trust ads - The American Genius

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Opinion Editorials

Strong leaders can use times of crises to improve their company’s future

(EDITORIAL) In the COVID-19 crisis, some leaders fumbled through it, while others quietly safeguarded their company’s future.

Published

on

strong leaders

Anthony J. Algmin is the Founder and CEO of Algmin Data Leadership, a company helping business and technology leaders transform their future with data, and author of a new book on data leadership. We asked for his insights on how strong leaders can see their teams, their companies, and their people through this global pandemic (and other crises in the future). The following are his own words:

Managers sometimes forget that the people we lead have lives outside of the office. This is true always but is amplified when a crisis occurs. We need to remember that our job is to serve their teams, to help them be as aligned and productive as possible in the short and long terms.

Crises are exactly when we need to think about what they might be going through, and realize that the partnership we have with our employees is more than a transaction. If we’ve ever asked our people to make sacrifices, like working over a weekend without extra pay, we should be thinking first about how we can support them through the tough times. When we do right by people when they really need it, they will run through walls again for our organizations when things return to normal.

Let them know it’s okay to breathe and talk about it. In a situation like COVID-19 where everything was disrupted and people are adjusting to things like working from home, it is naturally going to be difficult and frustrating.

The best advice is to encourage people to turn off the TV and stop frequently checking the news websites. As fast as news is happening, it will not make a difference in what we can control ourselves. Right now most of us know what our day will look like, and nothing that comes out in the news is going to materially change it. If we avoid the noisy inputs, we’ll be much better able to focus and get our brains to stop spinning on things we can’t control.

And this may be the only time I would advocate for more meetings. If you don’t have at least a daily standup with your team, you should. And encourage everyone to have a video-enabled setup if at all possible. We may not be able to be in the same room, but the sense of engagement with video is much greater than audio-only calls.

We also risk spiraling if we think too much about how our companies are struggling, or if our teams cannot achieve what our organizations need to be successful. It’s like the difference in sports between practice and the big game. Normal times are when leaders game plan, strategize, and work on our fundamentals. Crises are the time to focus and leave it all on the field.

That said, do not fail to observe and note what works well and where you struggle. If you had problems with data quality or inefficient processes before the crisis, you are not fixing them now. Pull out the duct tape and find a way through it. But later, when the crisis subsides, learn from the experience and get better for next time.

Find a hobby. Anything you can do to clear your head and separate work from the other considerations in your life. We may feel like the weight of the world is on our shoulders, and without a pressure release we will not be able to sustain this level of stress and remain as productive as our teams, businesses, and families need us.

Continue Reading

Opinion Editorials

7 sure-fire ways to carve out alone time when you’re working from home

(EDITORIAL) It can be easy to forget about self-care when you’re working from home, but it’s critical for your mental health, and your work quality.

Published

on

Woman in hijab sitting on couch, working from home on a laptop

We are all familiar with the syndrome, getting caught up in work, chores, taking care of others, and neglecting to take care of ourselves in the meantime. This has always been the case, but now, with more people working from home and a seemingly endless lineup of chores, thanks to the pandemic. There is simply so much to do.

The line is thinly drawn between personal and professional time already, with emails, cell phones, and devices relentlessly reaching out around the clock, pulling at us like zombie arms reaching up from the grave. Working from home makes this tendency to always be “on” worse, as living and working take place in such close proximity. We have to turn it off, though.

Our brains and bodies need downtime, me-time, and self-care. Carving out this time is one of the kindest and most important things you can do for yourself. If we can begin to honor ourselves like this, the outcome with not only our mental and physical health but also our productivity at work will be beneficial. When we make the time to do things we love, our mind’s gears slow down that constant grinding. Burnout behooves nobody.

Our work will also benefit. Healthier, happier, more well-rested, and well-treated minds and bodies can work wonders! Our immune systems also need this, and we need our immune systems to be at their peak performance this intense season.

I wanted to write this article because I have such a struggle with this in my own life. I need to print it out and put it in my workspace. Last week, I posted something on my social media pages that so many people shared. It is clear we all need these reminders, so I am paying it forward here. The graphic was a quote from Devyn W.

“If you are reading this, release your shoulders away from your ears, unclench your jaw, and drop your tongue from the roof of your mouth.”

There now, isn’t that remarkable? It is a great first step. Let go of the tension in your body, and check out these ways to make yourself some healing me-time while working from home.

  1. Set aside strict no-work times. This could be any time of day, but set the times and adhere to them strictly. This may look like taking a full hour for lunch, not checking email after a certain hour, or committing to spending that time outdoors, reading, exercising, or enjoying the company of your loved ones. Make this a daily routine, because we need these boundaries. Every. Single. Day.
  2. Remember not to apologize to anyone for taking this me-time. Mentally and physically you need this, and everyone will be better off if you do. It is nothing to apologize for! Building these work-free hours into your daily schedule will feel more normal as time goes on. This giving of time and space to your joy, health, and even basic human needs is what should be the norm, not the other way around.
  3. Give yourself a device-free hour or two every day, especially before bedtime. The pinging, dinging, and blinging keep us on edge. Restful sleep is one of the wonderful ways our bodies and brains heal and putting devices away before bedtime is one of the quick tips for getting better sleep.
  4. Of course, make time for the things you absolutely love. If this is a hot bath, getting a massage, reading books, working out, cooking or eating an extravagant meal, or talking and laughing with a loved one, you have to find a way to get this serotonin boost!
  5. Use the sunshine shortcut. It isn’t a cure-all, but sunlight and Vitamin D are mood boosters. At least when it’s not 107 degrees, like in a Texas summer. But as a general rule, taking in at least a good 10-15 minutes of that sweet, sweet Vitamin D provided by the sun is good for us.
  6. Spend time with animals! Walk your dog, shake that feathery thing at your cat, or snuggle either one. Whatever animals make you smile, spend time with them. If you don’t have pets of your own, you could volunteer to walk them at a local shelter or even watch a cute animal video online. They are shown to reduce stress. Best case scenario is in person if you are able, but thankfully the internet is bursting with adorable animal videos, as a backup.
  7. Give in to a bit of planning or daydreaming about a big future trip. Spending time looking at all the places you will go in the future and even plotting out an itinerary are usually excellent mood-boosters.

I hope we can all improve our lives while working from home by making time for regenerating, healing, and having fun! Gotta run—the sun is out, and my dog is begging for a walk.

Continue Reading

Opinion Editorials

The one easy job interview question that often trips up applicants

(EDITORIAL) The easiest interview questions can be the hardest to answer, don’t let this one trip you up – come prepared!

Published

on

Women sitting nervously representing waiting for a remote job interview.

A job interview is tough, and preparing for them can seem impossible. There are some questions you can expect: what is your experience in this position? How would you handle this situation? And so on.

bar
But what about this question: what makes you happy? Though it may seem straightforward, getting to the right answer is not such an easy path.

Work engagement

According to research, less and less employees feel like they are truly engaged at work. Some blame the work environment but truth be told, it is not a company’s responsibility to make you happy.

Without a passion for what you are doing, you will never enjoy the job.

It is the best case for everyone. More engaged workers are more productive in addition to feeling like they serve a purpose.

Do your due diligence

So before finding yourself in an interview where you have to take an awkward pause before answering this question, the best thing is to do some research. It all starts with the job search.

When looking for a job it is easy to get caught up in high profile company names and perks.

For instance, although “Social Media Coordinator” may not be your thing, the position is open at the cool advertising agency downtown. Or perhaps the company offers flexible hours and free lunch Fridays. The problem is that these perks aren’t worth it in the long run. Working for a cool company can be exciting at first, but it is not sustainable without passion for the position.

It’s important to pay attention to is the position you are applying for.

Is this work that you are passionate about? Take a look at the job responsibilities and functions. Besides figuring out if those are things that you can do, ask yourself if they are things that you want to do. Is this an opportunity that will match your strengths and give you purpose?

Let your passion protrude

With all things considered, when asked “what makes you happy” at the next interview, you will be able to answer honestly. Your passion will be apparent without having to put on an act.

Even if they don’t ask that question, there is no downside to knowing what makes you happy.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!