Connect with us

Business Entrepreneur

10 advantages and disadvantages of becoming a freelancer

For many reasons, you may be considering becoming a freelancer, and while there is great freedom in becoming your boss, you also take on a great deal of responsibility and risk.

Published

on

You already know the signs of when it’s time to quit your job and become an entrepreneur. But before you start your own freelance business, you should be aware of the pros and cons for your decision. After all, this type of decision has the potential to be life-changing, in either a positive or negative way. But we’ve done the work for you. Here are the top five positives and the top five negatives of becoming a freelancer in lieu of a full-time, 9-to-5 employee.

5 advantages of being a freelancer

1. Flexible Hours – The first advantage of becoming a freelancer is that you can work whenever you want. You get to choose your own hours. If you want to sleep in until noon, you can do that. If you want to take the weekend off so you can explore the city, by all means, go for it. As a freelancer, you can actually work during your most productive hours, and those hours don’t have to fall in during regular business hours.

2. Control over Jobs and Clients – When you work for someone else, you don’t get a choice of who you work with. You can become stuck with unprofessional or rude clients. But, when you’re a freelancer, you can choose with whom you work. If you don’t mesh well with a client’s personality or business or payment philosophies, you can pass on the opportunity and wish them the best. It’s as easy as that.

3. Work Wherever You Want – Whether you prefer consistency or shaking things up when it comes to your work environment, you can choose to work wherever you want, whether you choose to work in a local coffee shop or while you’re on vacation in Europe.  You are no longer stuck in an office or even in your home. Find a place in which you work best. You could work in a park, at the library, or in your living room while you’re wearing your pajamas.

4. You’re the Boss – You no longer have to answer to anyone but your clients and yourself. No one is hanging over you or micromanaging you. You are free to do as you please, when you please. Making all the tough decisions just became your responsibility; you have all the control.

5. You Keep All the Profits – No longer do you have to work for a flat rate, no matter how large the projects are that you complete. Now, you get to allocate or keep all the profits from your large and small projects and clients. This gives you the freedom to then use that money to improve yourself and expand your business.

5 disadvantages of freelancing

1. Not Steady or Reliable Workloads – Unfortunately, being a freelancer means that your income and your workload are unstable and inconsistent. For the most part, you won’t be able to depend on any regular project, client, or profit, whereas you would know the exact pay you’ll receive at a traditional job.

2. Distinguishing Between Work and Personal Time – Being your own boss and working from your home also means that it can be difficult to distinguish between your work time and your personal life. This means that you can work long hours and never make time for your personal interests.

3. A lot of Legwork – You are now in charge of finding all your own clients and projects. When you worked a traditional job, your projects were probably handed to you. But now, you’re the sole person responsible, so that means a lot of legwork on your part.  And that means you have to wear many hats, including marketing, advertising, and sales.

4. Not Getting Paid – Being a freelancer also means that you run the risk of not getting paid. This is fairly common in the freelance world, and one more hat you’ll have to wear is that of a debt collector. There are ways to protect yourself from non-paying clients, but sometimes you won’t realize you’re at risk until it’s too late.

5. No Employer Benefits – Health benefits are expensive. Depending on your current health, switching to a freelance lifestyle might not be in your best interest. Also, starting your own freelance business means you no longer have paid sick days or vacation time to use. Every day you don’t work is a day you won’t get paid.

The takeaway

Freelancing is equal parts positive and negative. You just have to decide if you’re willing to take the risk that almost always accompanies it. Freelancing means professional freedom, but it also means instability and the risk of failure. And that may not be what you need in your professional life. But if you risk your stability for something more in tune with your professional goals than a traditional job, you have the opportunity to build your name and reputation and reach your professional goals.

This editorial was first published here in 2012.

The American Genius Staff Writer: Charlene Jimenez earned her Master's Degree in Arts and Culture with a Creative Writing concentration from the University of Denver after earning her Bachelor's Degree in English from Brigham Young University in Idaho. Jimenez's column is dedicated to business and technology tips, trends and best practices for entrepreneurs and small business professionals.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
43 Comments

43 Comments

  1. Pingback: Working Freelance | riannajade

  2. Pingback: 7 Tips for Web Design Freelancers Who Want to Remain Relevant | Social Marketing by WordPress

  3. Sabrina

    August 29, 2015 at 5:26 pm

    I started freelancing in June after graduating from college. Prior to that I was unemployed for 2.5yrs. Honestly, freelancing was the best decision I ever made. Sure, I ran into problems with non paying clients but perseverance paid off and I’ve not looked back.

  4. Pingback: Pros and Cons of Freelancing | lukemayneinteractive

  5. Christopher

    December 30, 2015 at 2:25 pm

    I was a hotel general manager for sixteen years. In 2008 I was laid off due to the financial crisis with nothing more
    than a severance package which was laughable. Since then I have been a freelance teacher specializing in Business English. My students are located throughout France, Germany and Japan, I have never felt more happier than at this moment. At the beginning it was difficult understanding what I was teaching, however, after a few months the light came on and things became easier. It has been 7 years since I began freelancing and from my heart, I am truly happy and my experience has been absolutely positive and life changing. It has been a zen like feeling and I have new friends
    all over Europe and an education no masters degree can provide. Freelancing has been a life changing experience and I no longer look back to the financial crisis or the past.

  6. Pingback: Six Great Freelancing Websites to Find Work in Calgary – Part II | Side Duty

  7. Pingback: The Steps To Taking A Leap Of Faith & Going Freelance | Career Services and Small Business HR Services by thecareercafe.co.uk – Blog

  8. Pingback: Career Development – UAL LEVEL 3 TV & FILM

  9. Pingback: Freelancer | Tom Willmott

  10. Pingback: Feeling Stretched Thin? Try Outsourcing | BusinessBlogs Hub

  11. Pingback: Ways to Make a Living from Home – Each Trading Day

  12. Pingback: Week 3: Working in the creative industries: is freelancing the road to success? – Creative Technologies Professionalism Blog

  13. Pingback: 5 Tips To Help You Make Money Freelancing - [Jcount.com]

  14. Pingback: Surprisingly Flexible Career Choices That You May Not Have Considered

  15. Rosie Beckett

    June 5, 2018 at 11:23 am

    My sister is really good at graphic design and illustration and she is thinking of doing freelance work but doesn’t know much about it, so I am glad that I found this article. It is interesting that you say you can choose the jobs and clients that you want to work with. This will be great for my sister because she can choose to only take jobs that interest her! Also, I think that my sister will enjoy being the boss and having control over all of her projects.

    • Lani Rosales

      June 5, 2018 at 12:12 pm

      With great risk comes great reward. Peter Drucker said, “Whenever you see a successful business, someone once made a courageous decision.”

      Good luck to your sister!

  16. Pingback: Get Wise - Fast and Quick Ways to Earn Extra Income: A Guide - Video God

  17. Pingback: 10 advantages and disadvantages of becoming a freelancer | Choice Information In One Place

  18. Pingback: 10 advantages and disadvantages of becoming a freelancer | #1 Lancebase fan

  19. Pingback: Freelance writing- the best business – You Been Blinded

  20. Pingback: What Does a Career in Public Safety Offer? – Polite On Society

  21. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice

  22. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice – Tech Online Earn

  23. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - Learn Best Tips And Tricks

  24. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - My Thoughts on!

  25. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - Affiliate Marketing

  26. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice – Seo News Portal

  27. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - IM John Ainsworth

  28. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice – Digital Marketing Service

  29. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice | My Blog

  30. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - Prosperity

  31. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice | Wealth Sledge

  32. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice – Shane Goodgie

  33. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - EARN PAY WHILE HOME

  34. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - Make Money Online

  35. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice – tipsandtrickslife.com

  36. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice | tipsandtrickslife.com

  37. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - INTL Solutions Group

  38. Pingback: Basic Information Needed to Generate an Online Invoice - Monetize the Web

  39. Pingback: Outsourcing Websites - Something for Any Business and Freelancer - Bunny Studio

  40. Pingback: Why is Using Freelancers Better for Businesses? |Small Business Sense

  41. Pingback: Career Tips for Young Adults With Disabilities - Disabled Spectator

  42. Pingback: 3 Careers For The Modern Woman - New To HR

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business Entrepreneur

‘Small’ business was once a stigma, but is now a growing point of pride

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) Small businesses make up the majority of companies, employers, and money makers of the American economy, that’s something to be proud of.

Published

on

American small business

Prior to the Industrial Revolution, all businesses were small businesses. Independent craftsmen served communities with vital services. Small merchants opened shops to provide the community with goods. Lawyers, doctors, and other professionals hung out a shingle to offer their services to neighbors. Small businesses were the norm. Some of the most beloved American companies started out local. John Deere, Harley Davidson, and King Arthur Flour, all got their start as small businesses.

Business changes led to a attitude change

It wasn’t until manufacturing allowed businesses to scale and produce more efficiently that the idea of big business became more important. Post-World War II, the idea of a small business became derogatory. It was the age of big government. Media was growing. Everyone wanted to be on top. Small businesses took a back seat as people moved from rural to urban communities. Small business growth plateaued for a number of years in the mid-20th century. Fortunately, the stigma of small business is fading.

Small businesses are the backbone of the economy

According to the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council, the “American business is overwhelmingly small business.” In 2016, 99.7% of firms in American had fewer than 500 workers. Firms with 20 workers or less accounted for 89.0% of the 5.6 million employer firms. The SBE also reports that “Small businesses accounted for 61.8% of net new jobs from the first quarter of 1993 until the third quarter of 2016.” Small businesses account for a huge portion of innovation and growth in today’s economy.

Modern consumers support small businesses

According to a Guidant Financial survey, the most common reason for opening a small business is to be your own boss. Small business owners are also dissatisfied with corporate America. Consumers also want to support small businesses. SCORE reports that 91% of Americans patronize a small business at least once a week. Almost half of Americans (47%) frequent small businesses 2 to 4 times a week.

Be proud of small business status

Small businesses are the innovators of tomorrow. Your neighbors want to support small businesses, knowing that their tax dollars stay in the community, and that they’re creating opportunities within their own city. Your small business status isn’t a slight. It’s a source of pride in today’s economy. Celebrate the fact that you’ve stepped out on your own in uncertain times. Celebrate the dirt under your fingernails, literally, or figuratively, that made you take a risk to do what mattered to you.

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Why and how to acquire a business – 4 tips for radical success

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) Acquiring a business can be a key part of your business’s future growth, but there are some factors you should consider before signing the deal.

Published

on

A meeting room with people shaking hands over acquiring a business

Growing businesses have multiple levers that can be pulled separately or in unison to continue scaling and expanding. And while many companies choose to grow internally, there’s always the option of acquiring other businesses to supercharge results and instantly expand.

Why Acquire?

Acquiring a business is certainly a complicated path to expansion, but it’s also a highly attractive one for a variety of reasons. This includes:

  • Increased market share. If you’re acquiring a business that happens to be a competitor, you can instantly increase your market share. If you currently own 20 percent of the market share and the competition has 15 percent, you suddenly catapult to 35 percent. That might make you the industry leader overnight!
  • Expansion into new markets. Sometimes you acquire a business outside of your industry or niche. In this case, it allows you to expand vertically or horizontally. This can improve top-line revenue and/or reduce costs and benefit profit margins.
  • Advanced tech and IP. In some situations, an acquisition is about acquiring a specific piece of technology or intellectual property (IP). This may prove to be the final boost you need to accelerate growth and initiate further expansion.
  • Talent acquisition. One of the secondary benefits of an acquisition is the opportunity to welcome new talent into your team. Whether it’s a seasoned executive or a highly effective sales staff, this is one benefit you can’t ignore.

Mergers and acquisitions aren’t the correct solutions in every situation, but they often make sense. It’s ultimately up to your team to sit down and discuss the pros, cons, opportunities, drawbacks, and possibilities of pursuing this option.

Helpful Acquisition Tips

Should your business choose to move forward with the acquisition route, here are some essential tips to be aware of:

1. Assemble a Talented Team

Don’t do anything until you first develop an acquisition team. This is a very important step and should not be delayed. (Many businesses make the mistake of starting the search and then forming a team on the fly, but this results in missed opportunities and foundational errors that can compromise an otherwise smart acquisition.)

A good acquisition team should include an experienced mergers and acquisitions advisor, a responsible executive, an attorney, an HR professional, and an IT expert. You’ll also want to bring on a public relations professional as soon as possible. This will ensure you control the messaging that customers, investors, and even employees hear.

2. Do Extensive Due Diligence

With the support of a talented dream team, you’re equipped to find the best acquisition opportunities. As you narrow your targets down, you’ll want to identify and implement a very detailed due diligence process for acquiring a business. This may include an extensive, objective analysis that consists of a letter of intent, confidentiality agreement, contracts and leases, financial statements, tax returns, and other important documents.

3. Make an Initial Offer

If the due diligence checks out, then it’s time to work on formulating an offer for acquiring a business. While the first offer almost certainly won’t be the offer that gets accepted, it’s the single most important offer you’ll make. It frames the transaction and sets the tone for the rest of the negotiations. It’s generally a good idea to offer no more than 75 to 90 percent of what you’re willing to pay. It should be low enough to leave room to inch up, but not so low that the other party could potentially see it as an insult.

4. Negotiate

Your first offer won’t get accepted. But unless you’ve totally insulted the other business, they should come back with a counter. Now is where things get really interesting. Negotiations ensue and it’s time to counter back and forth. The offer consists of a variety of elements – not just a price tag – so consider all of these variables in your subsequent counters.

Adding it All Up

As valuable as an acquisition can be, the process is often filled with friction. It’s up to your team to make the transition after closing as smooth as possible.

It’s very important that you respect the products, services, employees, and customers that the acquired business has. If you come into an acquisition and attempt to shake things up on day one, you’re going to get backlash. There’s nothing wrong with making changes – you now own the business – but be diplomatic and patient. Build trust, work together, and gradually introduce changes.

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Should you use use confidentiality clauses in your severance agreements?

(BUSINESS) Confidentiality clauses and NDAs have long been tied to severance agreements – but is that notion becoming outdated?

Published

on

severance agreement

Severance agreements and their ilk have long included confidentiality clauses, often comprising an exhaustive list of actions former employees may not take should they desire to keep the benefits listed in the agreement. Carey & Associates P.C.’s Mark Carey breaks down the knowledge you’ll need to successfully incorporate a severance agreement – including a stern warning about the future of confidentiality clauses.

There is a long list of things you’ll need when curating a severance agreement, but we’ll start with Carey’s honey-do-nots.

Carey’s primary recommendation is avoiding a non-compete clause where, previously, there wasn’t one.

“As employment lawyers, we see this tactic used every day, but you do not,” he says.

This is because most employment lawyers will advise that a non-compete agreement is largely unenforceable, which sets a poor precedent for an otherwise airtight document.

Carey even recommends against reviewing prior non-compete clauses for the same reason.

He also eschews what he calls the “21 days to sign – or else” philosophy, and he advises that employers should loop themselves into the non-disparagement clause so that employees cannot be blacklisted – something he refers to as “a very real phenomenon.”

What a severance agreement should include is a non-admission provision, a payment provision, a release of all claims to cover any feasible scenarios regarding employee disclosure, a challenge to agreement, a “no other amounts are due” section to release the employer from future responsibility, and a mandate to return any company property. This is a truckload of information, so you’ll want an employment lawyer to help you through the process.

But what Carey warns against is the future of confidentiality agreements, or NDAs. While these provisions have long accounted for employee silence in the face of abusive or corrupt employers, Carey posits that, one day, “confidentiality provisions in employee severance agreements will be banned as a matter of statute and public policy.”

This assertion comes in the wake of the #MeToo movement and the uncovering of the manner in which powerful people were using NDAs to buy silence from the people who suffered under their direction. Carey points out that it’s a non-partisan issue; corruption isn’t aligned with one specific political party, and the option to come forward with allegations of misconduct is a courtesy that should be afforded to all.

Whether or not confidentiality agreements are ethical is a moot point, and Carey does recommend continuing to use them when necessary – but, sooner or later, one can safely assume that the landscape of severance agreements will change, arguably for the better.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!