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LA-based, Armenian-born Style Coach discusses female entrepreneurship

(ENTREPRENEURSHIP) Style Coach discusses starting her own business, becoming an international female entrepreneur, and lessons learned from Armenian culture.

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Two women shopping, with one being a style coach.

About the author: Anaïs DerSimonian is a writer, filmmaker, and educator interested in media, culture, and the arts. She is Clark University Alumni with a degree in Culture Studies and Screen Studies. She has produced various documentary and narrative projects, including a profile on an NGO in Yerevan, Armenia that provides micro-loans to cottage industries and entrepreneurs based in rural regions to help create jobs, and self-sufficiency, and stimulate the post-Soviet economy. She is currently based in Boston. 

Varduhi Movsisyan–an LA-based, Armenian-born, London-educated certified Style Coach–is on a mission; to help folks everywhere gain the confidence they need to achieve their greatest goals. And to look good while doing it.

So, what exactly is a Style Coach?

“A Style Coach is a lifestyle professional that combines personal styling with life coaching.” Says Vard–known professionally as VARD/MOV.

“A Style Coach helps people to select and style clothes and accessories that work for their body, coloration and personality AND helps individuals gain the confidence and skill set to dream big and achieve their goals.

Her multifaceted approach encompasses everything from color analysis, body shape styling, and closet audits to deep, intimate conversations that uncover a client’s true self-image and motivations. Sometimes, Vard says, her work is more counseling than it is styling.

But the two are more connected than you might think.

Vard, who decided to move to London and change careers a few years ago, started her professional journey as a teacher in the capital city of her homeland of Armenia. Soon, she opened her own teaching center–and got her first taste of the entrepreneurship thrill.

“All the time I spent listening to and empathizing with my students, focusing on building productive habits and a sustainable wellbeing, has actually worked to my benefit as a Style Coach. It gives me a leg up on my stylist counterparts, who can tend to think they know what’s best for a client before truly getting to know them.”

While the school teacher to personal stylist entrepreneur pipeline isn’t particularly common, Vard says switching careers to fashion without losing the aspects of teaching that made her feel fulfilled has given her the motivation as an entrepreneur to hit the ground running.

“I’m not exaggerating when I say that you could spend 24 hours a day building your own business and you still wouldn’t have enough time in the day. That’s why it’s so important to find a career path that you are not only good at or you care about, but one that provides deep fulfillment–you need that deep connection to your craft because it will undoubtedly also become your personal life. “

While Vard operates virtually out of Los Angeles, she also doesn’t mind meeting clients in-person in Los Angeles, London, and Armenia–to name a few. In addition to her cosmopolitan travel habits, she also incorporates this mindset into the philosophy of her work.

Instead of shedding her home culture to blend in with the rest of the LA fashion circuit, Vard leverages aspects of her heritage that she sees as “transferable strengths” to inform her work as a Style Coach.

When asked about what Vard sees as “transferable strengths”, she has a lot to say:

“From the Genocide, to Soviet rule to modern wars, Armenians have been through a lot–and as a people, they are beautifully resilient. Throughout my travels, I still maintain that Armenians are some of the most generous, hospitable, welcoming people you will ever meet–and more importantly, they know how to enjoy life’s happy moments to the fullest. An Armenian will bring a bouquet of flowers and a box of chocolate to every outing, even if it’s just to their friend’s house down the road.”

As an Armenian myself, it made me happy to hear that the traditions of my culture were being leveraged by Vard to help folks from a variety of backgrounds.

“As a Style Coach, I love bringing this philosophy to my work–teaching clients how to make a sweet event out of every moment you can. We can all learn a lot from the Armenian mentality, like seeing the beauty in everything and not sweating the small things. You can be tough and resilient without losing the softness and charm that make you YOU.”

A hardworking, self-made, and philosophically-unique entrepreneur, VARD/MOV truly blends style with innovation–and shows that you don’t have to have a background in business or management to follow your passion and launch an exciting new business.

The official launch of VARD/MOV–her 2.0 rebranded business–launches on June 1st.

The American Genius is news, insights, tools, and inspiration for business owners and professionals. AG condenses information on technology, business, social media, startups, economics and more, so you don’t have to.

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Business Entrepreneur

Small businesses angry at depletion of COVID-19 relief funds without warning

(ENTREPRENEUR) Small businesses are in shock when they find out COVID-19 relief funds are no longer available, with an email update from the SBA.

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Small businesses are no longer offered EDIL loans from the SBA.

In May, the Small Business Administration (SBA) sent out an update to borrowers of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) for COVID-19 relief. The EIDL program is now out of funds, according to an email sent to borrowers.

The loan program formally closed back in December 2021, but there was a period when small businesses who had already received funding could request additional money. That period is now officially over, and the $345 billion that was allotted for COVID-19 relief is gone.

The impact of EIDL

Many owners and entrepreneurs are outraged and frustrated with the lack of transparency from the SBA. There was no warning that the funds were almost depleted and many businesses were relying on that loan money to keep their businesses afloat as the economy rebounds. However, SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman praised the program,

“The SBA has delivered historic economic relief to millions of America’s small businesses through the COVID Economic Injury Disaster Loan program…”

According to an SBA press release, over $390 billion in aid was distributed to nearly 4 million businesses.

Small businesses still need help

In May, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), told health ministers that COVID-19 and its effects are not over. Here in the United States, life seems to be getting back to normal, if you discount the horrific inflation and gas prices, which are further impacting the recovery of small businesses.

Congress has been wrangling with legislation (H.R. 3807) that would offer more funding for those that were hit hard due to covid. Getting the House and Senate to agree on this legislation is expected to be difficult. So, no guarantees that more help is coming.

The SBA recommends that businesses who need more resources contact their local SBA office. Virtual appointments can be made for those who wish to avoid contact.

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Business Entrepreneur

Regularly update your succession plan – it isn’t for setting and forgetting!

(ENTREPRENEUR) You may think that once you have a succession plan in place, you’re set for life, however, it’s recommended to continually update them!

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business succession plan

We’ve written before about how the everlasting success of the business will need to outlive you, and this is best conjured up in a succession plan. This is especially true for small business owners and entrepreneurs that have built an empire for themselves but aren’t sure what the future will hold beyond their passing. This is the exact reason that succession plans shouldn’t be set and forgotten, but instead consistently updated.

What are some of the obvious reasons that you may need to update your succession plan?

  1. Health Issues
  2. Marriage or Remarriage
  3. Changes in health in executors or guardians
  4. Changes in the law
  5. Changes in Residence

Now, for the not-so-obvious reason: It should be updated when any personal circumstances changes, which most likely happen often. This is why a will is like your home, an investment that needs to be properly maintained, and if it is, it will last a very long time.

Examples include changes in economic or parental status, as well as designations or fiduciaries. Elders could be aging, siblings may be having their own life changes, as well as if any dependents are born with or develop special needs.

“Every state has different laws regarding the administration of a will,” he said.?“For instance, states vary regarding the required residence of an executor, inheritance tax laws, and whether a child can be disinherited by omission.”

The recommended procedure is to review wills and powers of attorney at least every five years.

Lastly, when should a will update to a trust?

  1. When you have some significant assets (more than $500,000) in your own name.
  2. If you have special needs beneficiaries.
  3. If you have properties in multiple jurisdictions (multiple states or even counties).
  4. If you have beneficiaries you want to control distributions to (e.g., distribute at ages 25/30/35).
  5. If you have kids from a previous relationship you want taken care of.
  6. If you may want asset protection (special trust needed).
  7. If you are a big dog (over $22M if married), to save taxes.

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Business Entrepreneur

Should your severance agreements include confidentiality clauses?

(ENTREPRENEUR) Confidentiality clauses and NDAs have long been tied to severance agreements – but is that notion becoming outdated?

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severance agreement

Severance agreements and their ilk have long included confidentiality clauses, often comprising an exhaustive list of actions former employees may not take should they desire to keep the benefits listed in the agreement. Carey & Associates P.C.’s Mark Carey breaks down the knowledge you’ll need to successfully incorporate a severance agreement – including a stern warning about the future of confidentiality clauses.

There is a long list of things you’ll need when curating a severance agreement, but we’ll start with Carey’s honey-do-nots.

Carey’s primary recommendation is avoiding a non-compete clause where, previously, there wasn’t one.

“As employment lawyers, we see this tactic used every day, but you do not,” he says.

This is because most employment lawyers will advise that a non-compete agreement is largely unenforceable, which sets a poor precedent for an otherwise airtight document.

Carey even recommends against reviewing prior non-compete clauses for the same reason.

He also eschews what he calls the “21 days to sign – or else” philosophy, and he advises that employers should loop themselves into the non-disparagement clause so that employees cannot be blacklisted – something he refers to as “a very real phenomenon.”

What a severance agreement should include is a non-admission provision, a payment provision, a release of all claims to cover any feasible scenarios regarding employee disclosure, a challenge to agreement, a “no other amounts are due” section to release the employer from future responsibility, and a mandate to return any company property. This is a truckload of information, so you’ll want an employment lawyer to help you through the process.

But what Carey warns against is the future of confidentiality agreements, or NDAs. While these provisions have long accounted for employee silence in the face of abusive or corrupt employers, Carey posits that, one day, “confidentiality provisions in employee severance agreements will be banned as a matter of statute and public policy.”

This assertion comes in the wake of the #MeToo movement and the uncovering of the manner in which powerful people were using NDAs to buy silence from the people who suffered under their direction. Carey points out that it’s a non-partisan issue; corruption isn’t aligned with one specific political party, and the option to come forward with allegations of misconduct is a courtesy that should be afforded to all.

Whether or not confidentiality agreements are ethical is a moot point, and Carey does recommend continuing to use them when necessary – but, sooner or later, one can safely assume that the landscape of severance agreements will change, arguably for the better.

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