Social Media

7 steps to elevate your social media presence [part one]

social media

By now, it is old news that you should blog or be on Twitter, but now that you’re online and have an intermediate level understanding of social media, how do you take it to the next level?

social media

Maximizing actions to maximize results

One day I was having lunch with a dear friend of mine who owns a record label. I offered to help them with their social media efforts, because they are at the same stage of most of my clients: they know what social media is, the basics of using the different sites, and understand social media etiquette.

What they don’t get is how to maximize their actions to get the best possible results from marketing their content.

If you’ve reached the point where you have an intermediate understanding of social media etiquette, but aren’t sure how to make more of an impact with what you share, this article is for you, too. These are simple, testable tips you can try, first one at a time and then together, to get your message to reach more people, who in turn can also help you spread your message outside your reach.

Some of these tips may seem obvious once you know them. But it’s often the little actions we take that make the biggest difference – I just happen to know more of them because social media is where I “live” during my work day.

(We’re going to assume you already understand how to produce compelling content for your audience. So much hinges on sharing what your community thinks is awesome, rather than what might have blown the CEO’s skirt up.)

This week, we will dive into the first two steps to elevate your social media presence, and next week will dive even deeper.

1. Perfect Your Timing

There are two types of timing you need to master – the “rush hours” at the sites you use, and the time at which your audience gives you the best response. This step will increase the number of people who will see your updates because you’ll be posting at a time when most people are on.

For example, more than half of Facebook users log in daily. And some of their login patterns are predictable. People tend to log in:

– when they wake up
– when they first get to work
– at lunch
– after work

People also log in on weekends but that’s a little bit trickier to predict. It’s worth your while to coordinate your posts to these time periods, and test to see when you’re getting the best responses.

You may also find that there’s a specific time when your audience tends to read your newsletters more. My original audience was made up of entrepreneurs building brand new microbusinesses and startups. I went against the grain on an instinct once and started sending out my newsletters at midnight on weekdays. My click and buy rates doubled, all because I figured out that other young entrepreneurs were up working at midnight just like I was.

2. Bond and Blend

People aren’t going to buy your product until they buy into YOU. You’d be surprised how much people wanting to support your endeavor or your company’s mission factors into their buying decision.

How do you get people to buy into you or your company? Tell your company’s story. Tell their stories. It may sound corny, but Care. Care as much about what’s happening in their lives and spreading their messages as you do about them spreading yours.

It’s perfectly logical once you think about it. On the current version of the web, most people are gravitating toward content and people they care about. If you care about the same topics as your community, and your community cares about the topics you write about, it’s only natural you share each other’s content.

You can never hope to catch every single item, so you’ll often follow other people who are on top of their curation game in your favorite subject. And those people are looking for the same thing you are – more about what they love, and more people to discuss those same interests.

What’s often forgotten is that discussion is a two way street. You can’t just talk about yourself and all the great things you do — that’s broadcasting. People get deaf and blind to that quickly – on Facebook there are even many ways to stay connected to you and still ignore your updates completely.

This is easier to grasp if you pay attention to the language, mannerisms and customs of the community you’re seeking to lead. It can be the simplest thing that makes or breaks you.

We bookworms often hate grammatical errors and typos more. Poets love it when you can properly execute a masterful turn of phrase.

Technical people may love all the intricate details, certain types of executives may want an overview of the big picture.

This is an ongoing process – you aren’t going to have one research phase and then it’s over. Stay current and involved.

Next week, I will address how to get people excited about your brand and empowering them to evangelize and offer advice on some tools to equip your toolbox. Some advice will be contrary to what the gurus have told you, so stay tuned!

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