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Social media image size cheat sheet and tips: 2015 edition

(Social Media) Social media rules and regulations change frequently, so get the scoop on the latest and your online presence will be better for it.

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social media image sizes

social media image sizes

Social media: the rules keep changing!

With each passing year, technology becomes more and more important. With that, social media has become a huge necessity when trying to market your business, your brand, or yourself. When trying to make a presence on the Internet, you have to make sure that you’re looking your best. This is achieved by having well-sized and appealing photos on your social media page.

As technology develops, social media templates develop as well in an effort to keep users feeling engaged. This new, new layouts for the variety of social media outlets have been switched up and setupablogtoday.com gives us the inside look at the best ways to size your photos.

1. Twitter

  • The page size is set at 1280 x 1024.
  • Header photo: 1500 x 500 – Image guidelines: recommended 1500 x 500 px; Maximum file size of 10MB; Use JPG, GIF, or PNG.
  • Profile photo: 400 x 400 (displays at 200 x 200) – Image guidelines: square image, recommended 400 x 400 pixels; Maximum file size 100KB; Use JPG, GIF, or PNG.
  • In-stream photo: 440 x 220 – Image guidelines: Minimum to appear expanded 440 x 220 pixels; Maximum to appear expanded 1024 x 512 pixels; Appears in stream collapsed at 506 x 253 pixels; Maximum file size of 5MB for photos and 3MB for animated GIFS.

2. Facebook

  • Profile image: 180 x 180 px – Image guidelines: Must be at least 180 x 180 pixels; Photo will appear on page as 160 x 160 pixels; Photo thumbnail will appear throughout Facebook at 32 x 32 pixels – Notes: The photo represents you or your brand and will appear on your timeline layered over your cover photo; It will also appear when you post to others’ walls or write comments.
  • Highlighted image: 1200 x 717 px – Image guidelines: Will appear on your page at 843 x 504 pixels; Choose a higher resolution for best quality.
  • Cover photo: 851 x 315 px – Image guidelines: Appear on page at 851 x 315 pixels (anything less will be stretched); Minimum size of 399 x 150 pixels; For best results, upload an RGB JPG file less than 100KB; Images with a logo or text may be best as a PNG file.
  • Shared images: 1200 x 900 – Image guidelines: Appear on page at 851 x 315 pixels (anything less will be stretched); Minimum size of 399 x 150 pixels; For best results, upload an RGB JPG file less than 100KB; Images with a logo or text may be best as a PNG file.
  • Shared link: 1200 x 627 – Image guidelines: Recommended upload size of 1200 x 627; Square photo a Minimum of 154 x 154 in feed, Square photo a Minimum of 116 x 116 on page, Rectangular photo a Minimum of 470 x 246 in feed, Rectangular photo a Minimum of 484 x 252 on page. Note: Facebook will scale photos under the minimum dimensions. For better results, increase image resolution at the same scale as the minimum size.

3. Google+

  • Profile image: 250 x 250 – Image guidelines: Minimum 120 x 120 pixels; Recommended 250 x 250 pixels; Maximum not listed (a 20MB photo at 5200 x 5300 pixels was able to be uploaded); JPG, GIF, or PNG. Note: You upload your image in a square format and then going render it into your page as a circle, so make sure you choose a photo that will not cut out your face.
  • Shared image: 497 x 373 – Image guidelines: Appears in home stream and on page at a width of 426 pixels (height is scaled); Minimum width of 497 pixels (will scale the height for you); Maximum upload 2048 x 2048 px; Shared link – 150 x 150 (thumbnail).
  • Cover image: 1080 x 608 – Image guidelines: Recommended 1080 x 608 pixels; Minimum 480 x 270 pixels; Maximum 2120 x 1192 pixels; Note: the cover photo may be the biggest on your page. Shared image: 150 x 150 – Image guidelines: Shows in the feed and on page as 150 x 150 pixels (pulls in photo from linked site).

4. Instagram

  • Profile image: 110 x 110 – Image guidelines: Appear on your home page at 110 x 110 pixels; Square photo – make sure to maintain an aspect ratio of 1:1.
  • Photo thumbnails: 161 x 161 – Image guidelines: The thumbnails will appear on the page at 161 x 161 pixels; Square photo – make sure to maintain an aspect ratio of 1:1.
  • Photo size: 640 x 640 – Image guidelines: The size of Instagram images has been increased to 640 x 640 pixels; Instagram still scales these photos down to 612 x 612; Appear in feed at 510 x 510 pixels.

5. Pinterest

  • Profile image: 165 x 165 – Image guidelines: Appears at 165 x 165 pixels on home page; Appears at 32 x 32 pixels on the rest of Pinterest; Maximum of 10MB.
  • Pin sizes: 236 width in pixels – Image guidelines: Pins on main page appear as 236 pixels (height is scaled); Pins on board appear as 236 pixels (height is scaled); Expanded pins have a minimum width 600 pixels (height is scaled).
  • Board display: 222 x 150 – Image guidelines: 222 x 150 pixels (large thumbnail); 55 x 55 (smaller thumbnail). Note: choose a well-sized image in order to attract attention.

6. Tumblr

  • Profile image: 128 x 128 px – Image guidelines: Minimum 128 x 128 pixels; JPG, GIF, PNG, or BMP. Note: the profile image will appear as an icon next to your posts. It will also appear on your page, depending on your profile layout. Make sure to choose an image that fits both the icon shape and the profile shape.
  • Image posts: 570 x 750 – Image guidelines: Dash images sizes max at 1280 x 1920, and show in feeds at 500 x 750; Images cannot exceed 10MB; Animated GIFS must be under 1MB and max at 500 pixels.

7. YouTube

  • Video uploads: 1280 x 760 – Video guidelines: Videos must maintain a 16:9 aspect ratio; In order to qualify as full HD, your dimensions must be at least 1280 x 720 pixels.
  • Channel cover photo: 2560 x 1440 – Image guidelines: With YouTube’s many different platforms and devices, it is important to have a photo optimized for any viewing – Display sizes – Tablet display: 1855 x 423; Mobile display: 1546 x 423; TV display: 2560 x 1440; Desktop: 2560 x 423; 1546 x 423 – pixels are always visible.

8. LinkedIn

  • Standard logo: 100 x 60 – Image guidelines: 100 x 60 pixels (resized to fit); Maximum 2MB; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: One of the two brand logos that should be uploaded is a business logo.
  • Banner image: 646 x 220 (minimum) – Image guidelines: Minimum 646 x 220 pixels; Maximum 2MB; Landscape layout; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: Banner images were recently implemented and are very prominent on a LinkedIn profile; use this as a way to attract users to your business.
  • Career cover photo: 974 x 300 – Image guidelines: Minimum 974 x 300 pixels; Maximum 2MB; Landscape layout; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: This is the largest image on a LinkedIn page, use a picture that will speak to your company and will appeal to potential employees.
  • Square logo: 150 x 50 – Image guidelines: 50 x 50 pixels (resized to fit); Maximum 2MB; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: This is the image that will show up when your company is searched. Therefore, use something recognizable.

Visual breakdown of all size requirements:

2015 social media image size cheat sheet#SMimagesizes

 

Taylor is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and has a bachelor's degree in communication studies from Illinois State University. She is currently pursuing freelance writing and hopes to one day write for film and television.

Social Media

Why your Instagram follower counts might be jacked

(SOCIAL MEDIA) What’s going on with Instagram follower counts? It’s a v-day bug, of course!

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Instagram

Yesterday, I did what I usually do on Instagram – peruse through my own profile because I enjoy my photos. Though my follower count is nothing to write home about, I was confused when I noticed I had lost about 10 followers and had mysteriously unfollowed about the same number of people.

To quote Alicia Silverstone in Clueless, “I was like, totally buggin’”. Turns out, bug was the operative prefix as a bug was cause for the issue, and many users were feeling the bite.

TechCrunch shared that Instagram confirmed the bug was the problem causing follower counts to change. The social media platform also said that the issue should be resolved by 9 a.m. PST on Valentine’s Day (because the only love worth celebrating is that of your follower count!)

At first, many users, myself included, assumed that the decrease in followers came from an attempt from Instagram to remove fake spam accounts. However, when we noticed that our following count had also gone down, that was when people took to Twitter to complain.

One user wrote, “so I just lost like 4K on Instagram and it unfollowed like 100 people within a matter of minutes? what’s going on [whining emoji] like I’m not mad about my follower count cause I’d rather have less spam followers and better engagement but like why is it unfollowing people?!”

Instagram also used Twitter as a way to explain the issue, which is where they shared that the problem should be fixed by Thursday morning. “We’re aware of an issue that is causing a change in account follower numbers for some people right now. We’re working to resolve this as quickly as possible,” the company tweeted on February 13. “Update: we’re expecting to have this issue resolved by 9 a.m. PST tomorrow. We understand this is frustrating, and our team is hard at work to get things back to normal.”

My follower/following count went back to normal a few hours after I noticed the issue, but it may take just a bit longer for all users to see the counts restored.

Share with us below if this issue threw off your social media game yesterday!

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Social Media

Fallout from Facebook’s shady program spying on children

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook is barely even trying to be sneaky anymore, paying children to allow them to spy. Shameless.

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Facebook recently landed in hot (boiling) water when it was uncovered that Facebook has been paying teens to install a “research” VPN on their devices that would allow the tech giant to see all of the teen’s cellular and web usage, for about $20 worth of gift cards each month.

The participants were largely recruited into the program as a result of targeted Snapchat and Instragram ads, and offered participants additional incentives to refer friends into the program too.

The purpose of this Big Brother program was not to empower young minds with technological innovation, but to use all of this data to track Facebook’s competitors, keep track of emerging trends, and otherwise be creepin’ on the kids. The program reportedly went so far as to ask users to share screenshots of their Amazon order history pages.  

According to the report: “Facebook sidesteps the App Store and rewards teenagers and adults to download the Research app and give it root access to network traffic in what may be a violation of Apple policy so the social network can decrypt and analyze their phone activity.”

Oh, and if the privacy concerns of this whole program weren’t terrifying enough; it has been going on since 2016.

Almost immediately after the news broke, Apple banned Facebook’s Research VPN and shut down the iOs version of the Research app, before Facebook could suspend the program voluntarily. Apple also released a statement condemning the program and Facebook’s shady choice to hide it in the iOs Developer certificate rather than the App Store (where apps that collect personal data have been banned since last summer).

This entire debacle highlights the murky borders of online consent when children and teens are involved. Not only are teens less likely to be aware of the risks of sharing their data, but also often parental “consent” is not real. There’s no verification of parental consent; if a teen checks a box in an online form saying that they are their parent—the website is none the wiser. The same is true for many age verification processes.

If you are a real parent reading this and want to check to make sure that your teen’s not selling their personal data for pennies, you LifeHacker has instructions to help you identify whether or not they are in the program (and get them out of it!).

This entire debacle is a nice reminder that large tech companies may offer innovative services, high salaries to employees, and strange new ways of keeping in touch with people we’d probably forgotten by now, but the product is not the social networks they build.

The product that Facebook, Google, Amazon, and other giants are really interested in is data – we’ve been reporting that for over a decade now. Their treatment of people that may not even be able to consent to sharing their data highlights this narrow goal. If you a not a person, but rather a collection of market insights, what does your age matter? It’s just another variable for the algorithms (robots).

The upside of this entire debacle is that many parents previously unaware of this type of program are now talking to their children about this topic.

Further, this gives politicians more tangible evidence of why media companies like Facebook should never get a free pass for bad behavior.

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Social Media

We’re skeptical of FB’s reason for killing the Moments app

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook is killing Moments. Turns out, most people don’t know it exists – here’s what we’ll all be missing.

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facebook moments

January was the longest year ever, amirite guys? Now all that’s over, we can finally say goodbye to toxic things like Whole 30 oversharers and, if we’re lucky, terrible products from tech giants.

I love writing about tech companies’ failed attempts at ~cool~ new products. Honestly, it’s become a personal hobby, or, dare I say, delight. Nothing warms my ice cold heart like seeing Google Glass, Google+, and the Facebook “Moments” app go up in flames.

*record screeches*

Wait, hold up… there was a Facebook Moments app? What the heck is (or was) the Moments app?

In case if you didn’t know like most people, here’s what you need to know:

Moments was originally created in 2015 as a way for Facebook users to privately share photos outside of the standard Facebook platform. The app implemented machine learning and facial recognition technology to help group photos, and then “recommended” who to share the photos with based off who was in the picture.

Get off my lawn.

If there’s anything we learned in 2018, it’s that we can totally trust Facebook with very private and personal information!

And I know what you’re thinking: why would this crappier and creepier version of Google Photos be necessary? Spoiler alert: it’s not.

In a moment of temporary sanity, Facebook announced it’s shutting down Moments and the app in its entirety on February 25th, citing a notable lack of downloads.

Here’s the interesting bit, though: no other reasons were mentioned like security or privacy concerns, and they insisted it’s pulling the plug only because not enough people downloaded it.

Considering Facebook bullied hundreds of thousands of users into downloading the app, so much so that in 2016 it was #1 in the App Store for several days, do we really believe the “no user base” excuse?

What else is going on under the hood of Moments that isn’t being revealed?

Given the recent controversies surrounding Facebook’s lack of data transparency and unethical decision making in this realm of personal data, I have a hunch something else might be behind this sudden “no downloads” rhetoric.

Only time, and perhaps another amusing congressional hearing, will tell.

In the off chance you’re one of the seven people with photos on Moments, you’ve been forewarned, and make sure to delete all of your data from it in case if Zuck pulls another Cambridge Analytica.

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