Connect with us

Social Media

Social media image size cheat sheet and tips: 2015 edition

(Social Media) Social media rules and regulations change frequently, so get the scoop on the latest and your online presence will be better for it.

Published

on

social media image sizes

social media image sizes

Social media: the rules keep changing!

With each passing year, technology becomes more and more important. With that, social media has become a huge necessity when trying to market your business, your brand, or yourself. When trying to make a presence on the Internet, you have to make sure that you’re looking your best. This is achieved by having well-sized and appealing photos on your social media page.

As technology develops, social media templates develop as well in an effort to keep users feeling engaged. This new, new layouts for the variety of social media outlets have been switched up and setupablogtoday.com gives us the inside look at the best ways to size your photos.

1. Twitter

  • The page size is set at 1280 x 1024.
  • Header photo: 1500 x 500 – Image guidelines: recommended 1500 x 500 px; Maximum file size of 10MB; Use JPG, GIF, or PNG.
  • Profile photo: 400 x 400 (displays at 200 x 200) – Image guidelines: square image, recommended 400 x 400 pixels; Maximum file size 100KB; Use JPG, GIF, or PNG.
  • In-stream photo: 440 x 220 – Image guidelines: Minimum to appear expanded 440 x 220 pixels; Maximum to appear expanded 1024 x 512 pixels; Appears in stream collapsed at 506 x 253 pixels; Maximum file size of 5MB for photos and 3MB for animated GIFS.

2. Facebook

  • Profile image: 180 x 180 px – Image guidelines: Must be at least 180 x 180 pixels; Photo will appear on page as 160 x 160 pixels; Photo thumbnail will appear throughout Facebook at 32 x 32 pixels – Notes: The photo represents you or your brand and will appear on your timeline layered over your cover photo; It will also appear when you post to others’ walls or write comments.
  • Highlighted image: 1200 x 717 px – Image guidelines: Will appear on your page at 843 x 504 pixels; Choose a higher resolution for best quality.
  • Cover photo: 851 x 315 px – Image guidelines: Appear on page at 851 x 315 pixels (anything less will be stretched); Minimum size of 399 x 150 pixels; For best results, upload an RGB JPG file less than 100KB; Images with a logo or text may be best as a PNG file.
  • Shared images: 1200 x 900 – Image guidelines: Appear on page at 851 x 315 pixels (anything less will be stretched); Minimum size of 399 x 150 pixels; For best results, upload an RGB JPG file less than 100KB; Images with a logo or text may be best as a PNG file.
  • Shared link: 1200 x 627 – Image guidelines: Recommended upload size of 1200 x 627; Square photo a Minimum of 154 x 154 in feed, Square photo a Minimum of 116 x 116 on page, Rectangular photo a Minimum of 470 x 246 in feed, Rectangular photo a Minimum of 484 x 252 on page. Note: Facebook will scale photos under the minimum dimensions. For better results, increase image resolution at the same scale as the minimum size.

3. Google+

  • Profile image: 250 x 250 – Image guidelines: Minimum 120 x 120 pixels; Recommended 250 x 250 pixels; Maximum not listed (a 20MB photo at 5200 x 5300 pixels was able to be uploaded); JPG, GIF, or PNG. Note: You upload your image in a square format and then going render it into your page as a circle, so make sure you choose a photo that will not cut out your face.
  • Shared image: 497 x 373 – Image guidelines: Appears in home stream and on page at a width of 426 pixels (height is scaled); Minimum width of 497 pixels (will scale the height for you); Maximum upload 2048 x 2048 px; Shared link – 150 x 150 (thumbnail).
  • Cover image: 1080 x 608 – Image guidelines: Recommended 1080 x 608 pixels; Minimum 480 x 270 pixels; Maximum 2120 x 1192 pixels; Note: the cover photo may be the biggest on your page. Shared image: 150 x 150 – Image guidelines: Shows in the feed and on page as 150 x 150 pixels (pulls in photo from linked site).

4. Instagram

  • Profile image: 110 x 110 – Image guidelines: Appear on your home page at 110 x 110 pixels; Square photo – make sure to maintain an aspect ratio of 1:1.
  • Photo thumbnails: 161 x 161 – Image guidelines: The thumbnails will appear on the page at 161 x 161 pixels; Square photo – make sure to maintain an aspect ratio of 1:1.
  • Photo size: 640 x 640 – Image guidelines: The size of Instagram images has been increased to 640 x 640 pixels; Instagram still scales these photos down to 612 x 612; Appear in feed at 510 x 510 pixels.

5. Pinterest

  • Profile image: 165 x 165 – Image guidelines: Appears at 165 x 165 pixels on home page; Appears at 32 x 32 pixels on the rest of Pinterest; Maximum of 10MB.
  • Pin sizes: 236 width in pixels – Image guidelines: Pins on main page appear as 236 pixels (height is scaled); Pins on board appear as 236 pixels (height is scaled); Expanded pins have a minimum width 600 pixels (height is scaled).
  • Board display: 222 x 150 – Image guidelines: 222 x 150 pixels (large thumbnail); 55 x 55 (smaller thumbnail). Note: choose a well-sized image in order to attract attention.

6. Tumblr

  • Profile image: 128 x 128 px – Image guidelines: Minimum 128 x 128 pixels; JPG, GIF, PNG, or BMP. Note: the profile image will appear as an icon next to your posts. It will also appear on your page, depending on your profile layout. Make sure to choose an image that fits both the icon shape and the profile shape.
  • Image posts: 570 x 750 – Image guidelines: Dash images sizes max at 1280 x 1920, and show in feeds at 500 x 750; Images cannot exceed 10MB; Animated GIFS must be under 1MB and max at 500 pixels.

7. YouTube

  • Video uploads: 1280 x 760 – Video guidelines: Videos must maintain a 16:9 aspect ratio; In order to qualify as full HD, your dimensions must be at least 1280 x 720 pixels.
  • Channel cover photo: 2560 x 1440 – Image guidelines: With YouTube’s many different platforms and devices, it is important to have a photo optimized for any viewing – Display sizes – Tablet display: 1855 x 423; Mobile display: 1546 x 423; TV display: 2560 x 1440; Desktop: 2560 x 423; 1546 x 423 – pixels are always visible.

8. LinkedIn

  • Standard logo: 100 x 60 – Image guidelines: 100 x 60 pixels (resized to fit); Maximum 2MB; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: One of the two brand logos that should be uploaded is a business logo.
  • Banner image: 646 x 220 (minimum) – Image guidelines: Minimum 646 x 220 pixels; Maximum 2MB; Landscape layout; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: Banner images were recently implemented and are very prominent on a LinkedIn profile; use this as a way to attract users to your business.
  • Career cover photo: 974 x 300 – Image guidelines: Minimum 974 x 300 pixels; Maximum 2MB; Landscape layout; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: This is the largest image on a LinkedIn page, use a picture that will speak to your company and will appeal to potential employees.
  • Square logo: 150 x 50 – Image guidelines: 50 x 50 pixels (resized to fit); Maximum 2MB; PNG, JPG, or GIF. Note: This is the image that will show up when your company is searched. Therefore, use something recognizable.

Visual breakdown of all size requirements:

2015 social media image size cheat sheet#SMimagesizes

 

Taylor is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and has a bachelor's degree in communication studies from Illinois State University. She is currently pursuing freelance writing and hopes to one day write for film and television.

Social Media

European court busts Facebook for illegally tracking people

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook is in hot water again for how they track non-users (and many were unaware they ever did).

Published

on

facebook

Facebook has been collecting data from both users and non-users across the internet, and Europeans are not having it.

A Belgian court has ruled that Facebook violates privacy laws by using technologies like cookies, plug-ins, and pixels, to track internet users’ browsing behaviors on up to 10,000 websites, whether or not users even have a Facebook account. A similar ruling was handed down by a German court just last week.

The legal battle began in 2015 when the Belgian Privacy Commission brought a civil suit against Facebook, who attempted to argue, unsuccessfully, that because their European headquarters is in Ireland, they are outside of the jurisdiction of Belgian law.

Nonetheless, the Belgian court is charging Facebook fines of €250,000 per day, up to €100 million, or 124,000 million U.S. dollars, if they fail to comply. The court has ordered FB to cease tracking Belgian internet users and to destroy the data they’ve already collected.

What’s Facebook’s excuse for non-consensually gathering so much data? As usual, they try to sell users on giving up their privacy for a more “relevant” ad experience. But we all know this is just a coded way of saying that they do it for the advertisers.

Facebook also claims that this data gathering is consensual and that users have the option to opt out. “We require any business that uses our technologies to provide clear notice to end-users, and we give people the right to opt-out of having data collected on sites and apps off Facebook being used for ads,” says Richard Allen, Facebook’s vice president for public policy in Europe.

However, the court, and Belgian privacy watchdog groups, say that many of Facebook’s tracking mechanisms are invisible to the user, and that privacy controls are preset to opt-in, with opt-out options difficult to find. The Belgian court also says that Facebook isn’t being clear enough about how the data they’re collecting is being used.

Facebook plans to appeal the ruling, and the case could very well end up in the CJEU, Europe’s supreme court. The social media giant will probably have an increasingly difficult time getting away with tracking practices after the EU passes new rules, known as the General Data Protection Regulation, in May.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Can you legally monitor your employees’ online activities? Kinda

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Are they ways you are monitoring your employees online even legal? Did you know there are illegal methods? Yep.

Published

on

legality of monitoring employees online

Edward Snowden’s infamous info leak in 2013 brought to light the scope of surveillance measures, raising questions about legality of monitoring tactics. However, the breach also opened up broader discussion on best practices for protecting sensitive data.

No company wants to end up with a data breach situation on their hands, but businesses need to be careful when implementing monitoring systems to prevent data loss.

Monitoring your employee’s activity online can be a crucial part of safeguarding proprietary data. However, many legal risks are present when implementing data loss prevention (DLP) methods.

DLP tools like keystroke logging, natural language processing, and network traffic monitoring are all subject to federal and state privacy laws. Before putting any DLP solutions in place, companies need to assess privacy impact and legal risks.

First, identify your monitoring needs. Different laws apply to tracking data in transit versus data at rest. Data in transit is any data moving through a network, like sending an email. The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) requires consent for tracking any data in transit.

Data at rest is anything relatively immobile, like information stored in a database or archives. Collecting data at rest can fall under the Stored Communications Act (SCA), which typically prohibits unauthorized access or disclosure of electronic communications.

While the SCA does not usually prevent employers from accessing their own systems, monitoring things like Gmail accounts could get messy without proper authorization.

Who you’re tracking matters as well regarding consent and prior notification. If you’re just monitoring your own employees, you may run into disclosure issues. Some states, like Delaware and Connecticut, prohibit employee monitoring without prior notice.

The ECPA also generally prohibits tracking electronic communication, but exceptions are granted for legitimate business purposes so long as consent is obtained.

Monitoring third party communications can get tricky with wiretapping laws. In California and Illinois, all parties must be notified of any tracking. This can involve disclosures on email signatures from outbound employee emails, or a broad notification on the company’s site.

Implied consent comes from third parties continuing communication even with disclaimers present.

If you’re wanting to install DLP software on personal devices used for work, like a company cellphone, you could face a series of fines for not gaining authorization. Incorrect implementation may fall under spyware and computer crime laws.

With any DLP tools and data monitoring, notification and consent are crucial. When planning monitoring, first assess what your privacy needs are, then identify potential risks of implementing any tracking programs.

Define who, where, and why DLP software will apply, and make sure every employee understands the need for tracking. Include consent in employee onboarding, and keep employees updated with changes to your monitoring tactics.

Protecting your company’s data is important, but make sure you’re not unintentionally bending privacy laws with your data loss prevention methods. Regularly check up on your approaches to make sure everything is in compliance with monitoring laws.

Continue Reading

Social Media

What you need to know about Facebook’s collaborative stories

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook now allows Groups and Events to craft collaborative stories – here’s what you need to know.

Published

on

facebook collaborative stories

If you’re like me, you’ve never posted a story on Facebook. Many of you probably don’t even realize that Facebook got in the story game last year in an effort to compete with Snapchat and (sort of, maybe?) Instagram (even though they own it). Facebook is doing its best to change that by creating a more robust story experience that they hope will expand the networking possibilities of the already abundantly popular site.

Stories on Facebook seemed like a bit of a headscratcher at first, it seems like everyone has had enough story experience between their Snapchat and Instagram accounts, but according to Facebook, they plan on surpassing Snapchat’s capabilities by adding a number of features to boost usage.

Users of Facebook Groups and Events can now contribute to a Facebook story exclusive to the group’s members and can be controlled by admins. Their idea is that this could add excitement and momentum for social meetups, weddings, or parties. These collaborative stories will function similar to a hashtag, only it will be accessible only by those involved in the event or group.

While Snapchat has a group feature, you have to add members like a group chat, where Facebook’s idea gives the story feature a more open-ended scope that reaches a large amount of people where exclusivity is optional, rather than the purpose. Facebook is enabling groups based on hobbies, professions, locations, and ideologies to create their own niche content where you can go to blow off some steam or connect with people who love the same things you do.

Just think, you’ve always wanted to post a video into the Riverdale Facebook page arguing over Archie’s real age, now you can rant away without typing a word! Rather than spar with words, you can pontificate about Game of Thrones theories with all the gusto you can muster, emotions and all!

What was once lost in text will be lost no more.

Facebook will be giving page admins ultimate control over what gets posted or not, similar to how a page’s News Feed currently works. To encourage posting, Facebook has moved a bubble to the top of every event page for easy access.

Proving that they are serious about the future of collaborative stories, Facebook is working on integrating stories across the app instead of just throwing it in as a half-hearted extra for you to roll your eyes at. With Stories’ new abilities, users will be able to hit different groups and encourage sharing opportunities unavailable to Snapchat users. Rather than just liking or sharing a post you like, you’ll be able to share your opinion on the spot. Whether or not that’s a good thing is yet to be seen (troll on trollers!).

Continue Reading
Advertisement

The
American Genius
News neatly in your inbox

Join thousands of AG fans and SUBSCRIBE to get business and tech news updates, breaking stories, and MORE!

Emerging Stories