Connect with us

Social Media

Top 10 ways to use QR codes in your real estate marketing

Published

on

When I first started to read Agent Genius Magazine, I read a story by Lani Rosales about QR Code technology for real estate. The story, originally published in October of 2008, puzzled me as I wasn’t ready to embrace the technology, YET.

Fast forward to February 2010 and I am geeking out at PodCamp Western MA where the t-shirts sport a QR code on the front. Jaclyn Stevenson, one of the organizers of the PodCamp pioneered the idea to include the code on the shirts. Now I am ready to embrace this cool technology and my brain starts working over how I can best utilize QR codes into my real estate marketing.

Of course I went to Google to see what other agents were doing, but to my surprise there was scant information available, with Lani’s story being the best one. I sat right down and re-read the post and began to formulate my attack.

I could see that this technology was well suited for real estate, it would make my print advertising interactive and useful once again and put me out front as a REALTOR who is trying new things to help sell her listings.

Lately there has been a lot of agents adopting this into their marketing plan and a lot of talk on Twitter and Facebook about using QR Codes for real estate marketing.

Here are my Top Ten Ideas for using QR Codes in real estate:

#1- Sign riders.
I was already purchasing a sign rider for each listing with the property URL on it, so I added a QR code for the url, as well.

#2- Newspaper.
I had the local media come do a story on what QR Codes are and how I am utilizing them. This had two goals: teach the local public and get me some exposure.

#3- Video.
My boyfriend, Morriss, and I worked up a demonstration video that I can share with my potential clients to help them understand the process.

#4- Video again.
Each of my properties gets a virtual tour video. I include the QR code as a slide at the end of the video.

#5- My blog.
I have my QR Code badge displayed on the home page of my blog so that visitors can scan and go directly to a feed of all of my listings.

#6- Print advertising.
I include the QR code on my “Just Listed” and “Just Sold” postcards. I would also include it in my other print media, if I were in charge of the layout (my broker pays for the advertising). Town and Country Realtors in Leominster, MA has done a great job with incorporating QR Codes into their print advertising.

#7- Business cards.
My new order of business cards will have the QR code featured.

#8- Direct mail.
I am sending everyone in my sphere a mailing with a QR code and an invitation to try it out.

#9- Printed gift items.
I plan to include the code on any calendars, bookmarks, etc. that I may hand out.

#10- Google Map.
In the place of a feed of your listings, or perhaps in addition to the feed, you could create a Google map of your office listings, your personal listings, your open houses, etc. and use a QR Code of the map in your print promotion.

I have recently been working with Clikbrix and so far I really like what they offer. The personalized QR Code that you see at the top of this post was designed by them and I like this idea. Adding the agent’s face and some directions on how to use the code makes it more comfortable for the amateur user. Their site is easy to use and the page that is created is optimized for mobile browsers. The personalized QR code directs the user to a feed of all active listings, which makes it very versatile. There is also a lot of analytics built into their platform, making the process of tracking information much simpler.

Prior to using Clikbrix, I had created a feed of my current listings and used that to create a code for the same purpose. Clikbrix is a subscription, so you could use this idea to accomplish the same result.

I am often asked about the metrics and ROI of my QR code campaign. I think it is still too new to really measure how effective it is, but as to ROI…QR codes are free! I know that use of my QR Code marketing won’t be widespread, as of yet. I am hoping to be an ambassador for this new technology because it is cool, green and fun to use. It is another tool in my listing kit that separates me from the Triple P Realtors (put in a sign, place it on MLS and pray) and it demonstrates to my market that I am an agent that is working hard to learn to ways to help accomplish the sale of their home.

Are you using QR Codes in your real estate marketing? Doing something different that wasn’t mentioned here? Comment please!

AgentGenius.com has no affiliation with Clickbrix.

Lesley offers 21 years experience in real estate, public speaking and training. Lesley has a degree in communications and was the recipient of an international award for coordinating media in real estate. In the course of her career Lesley has presented at international real estate conferences and state REALTOR associations, hosted a real estate television program, written articles for trade magazines and created marketing and PR plans for many individuals, companies and non-profits.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
25 Comments

25 Comments

  1. Daniel Bates

    September 26, 2010 at 10:52 am

    Great article Lesley – After hearing people talk about them for years, it’s nice to finally see a practical example of how an agent uses them. I’m in a rural retirement area in the South which all adds up to mean that we’re about 5 years behind on technology. I don’t own a smart phone and would guess that less than 25% of my customers/clients do as well, but know that we’ll get there eventually. All that being said, I’m going to be trying this new technology out on the rental homes that I manage with a “check-in station” flyer on the entrance so that new renters can check-in via google places or facebook and be more prone to share the fun they’re having on their vacation (coupled with a way for people to contact me to have the same great fun) and leave a review. I’ll let you all know how it works out. Even if it’s only used by 25% of vacationers, it should increase facebook marketing results quickly.
    I watched your video on #3 and a suggestion would be that you include more information about how this benefits the seller and potential buyer and discuss what type of information is on the website that you send them to. I’ve found that the “wow factor” with technology impresses few and is fleeting unless you can prove it’s value.

    • LesleyLambert

      September 26, 2010 at 9:43 pm

      Thanks for stopping by and for the constructive feedback…good luck with your ideas!

  2. Linda Aaron

    September 26, 2010 at 11:57 am

    Lesley,

    Thank you for the post and reference to Lani’s original post. I am creating content for a workshop for our brokers and was researching QR codes this past week to include a section about why they need to be using the QR codes. Your post is timely and the link will be included in my class.

    Thanks,
    LA

    • LesleyLambert

      September 26, 2010 at 9:44 pm

      So glad it is pertinent for you right now!

    • Ben K

      September 27, 2010 at 5:26 pm

      @Linda
      In addition to QR codes, MSFT has something similar — MS Tag. Essentially the same thing but have better customization options, however, it does require a MS tag reader app.

      @Lesley
      Excellent piece. I’ve started to use QR codes and MS Tags, but in small doses. The list you provided was great…I’m taking away some good utilization ideas. Thanks!

  3. Gina Kay Landis

    September 26, 2010 at 4:24 pm

    Lesley, this is fabulous! Just started talking to people about using this and you’ve added a couple of ideas to my marketing arsenal. On my landing page of my company-provided web site, I have the QR codes that link to the virtual tour which also has a link to Google Maps so people can easily find the house, as well as links to set showings, and other link goodies.

    This will be the *way* of the future, and frankly the post office should be happy, because now there’s a great reason to do direct mail. I wonder too if the newspapers will insert a code into an open house ad… there are sooo many possibilities! Thanks for your article!

    @ginakayRE

    • LesleyLambert

      September 26, 2010 at 9:46 pm

      Gina, I am so glad to hear how you are implementing QR codes in real estate.

  4. Terence Richardson

    September 26, 2010 at 5:52 pm

    I’ve been considering implementing this kind of technology in my business and I think you make a very easy case for doing it. Thanks for a great article.

  5. Fred Romano

    September 26, 2010 at 8:11 pm

    OK so… Nice self promotional post with all those lovely links back to your sites. But the point is the average Bill Buyer or Sally Seller won’t care, understand, or give 2 hoots about QR Codes. To most folks it just looks like some strange logo or symbol, and means nothing. I would never waste my time using one – Unless I was a Realtor in Japan.

    I do applaud you for being so aggressive using it in your marketing. Hopefully it will pay off for you, other wise you will have wasted a lot of money and time on the expensive Clikbrix monthly fee and manually creating and updating your property listings. That seems like a lot of unnecessary extra work unless you have an assistant take care of it.

    – Cheers

    • LesleyLambert

      September 26, 2010 at 9:47 pm

      To each his own Fred.

    • Tassia Bezdeka

      September 28, 2010 at 3:39 pm

      Fred- Lest ye forget about the next generation of homebuyers!

      If a Realtor isn’t up to snuff with technology, he or she certainly won’t be the Realtor for me, or countless others in my age group.

      You might not see a reason to jump on it now, but (IMHO) it will only help you in the future to at least be familiar with the changes for when this does become the de facto standard of information gathering.

  6. Erik Goldhar

    September 27, 2010 at 12:26 am

    Thank you very much for the post Lesley!
    To your point, the QR Code is not only to be used on For Sale signage. We recommend that our Realtors use their Code on all marketing touch points including business cards, sales sheets, direct mail fliers, fridge magnets and more.

    Keep in mind that QR Code technology is an extremely “Green” form of marketing due to the fact that it could help Realtors reduce their printing. This is yet another marketing tool and differentiator using QR gives to our Realtor clients.

    Thank you for the post and good luck with all of your efforts.

    Sincerely,
    Erik Goldhar
    Partner, Clikbrix.com

    • LesleyLambert

      September 27, 2010 at 10:52 pm

      I keep forgetting to point out the “Green” aspects, thank you for pointing that out!

  7. Alex Dsouza

    September 27, 2010 at 8:29 am

    Hi Lesley Lambert
    First off, I thank you for sharing with us great tips on usage of QR codes in real estate marketing. I especially like the last point on Google Map. I never ever thought of it. Thanks, I’ll use QR Code of the map in print promotion and see how things progress.

  8. Jacksonville Real Estate Agent

    September 27, 2010 at 12:08 pm

    I think QR codes are cutting edge and maybe even bleeding edge, but I’m sticking with “Text for Info” for now. This alone is cutting edge considering most adults have just started using text as a viable form of communication within the last 2 years. Now 3 in 4 adults are using text on a regular basis!

  9. georgeoneill

    September 27, 2010 at 1:28 pm

    We put QR codes onto every For Sale sign. We are tracking this via Analytics, and while uptake is modest in our market (Toronto, Canada), we are seeing a good number of visitors. Remember, it is also important to make the targeted webpage mobile-friendly!

  10. Josh Galvan

    September 27, 2010 at 3:05 pm

    I think agents from all over should always look at their market and see if they are using these kinds of tools. Or if their market has the capability to use them (smart phone usage for qr readers). Many times with new tech tools there is this “we gotta have this and it will change our business” mentality just because it’s “new”, but then they find out it was a waste of time because their market doesn’t pick it up or use it.

    So simple point: Make sure it matches your market demographic or else you are climbing up the wrong hill.

  11. Jason Improta - Calabasas Homes for Sale

    September 27, 2010 at 8:22 pm

    This is great. I saw an ad in a magazine the other day (not real estate related) and decided I wanted to look into how to use it in my business. Thanks!!

  12. Nick Nymark

    September 28, 2010 at 1:11 am

    Very Cool, I brought this up to my broker about a month or so ago and might be starting to use it in the near future. I agree with web enabled cell phones becoming more wide spread. I think it’s going to be somewhat like GPS units. When they first came out they were really cool, and still are neat but as time goes on they keep coming out with better and better ones and are have made them much cheaper than they used to be and because of it more people are buying them.

  13. Chad Peevy

    October 6, 2010 at 10:48 am

    I just designed my first listing sign and property flyer with a QR Code printed on them. A few things I like about QR Codes:

    1) They allow me to scan something that I can later check out on my own time.

    2) Organic characteristic of the technology – ever had to re-print listing flyers because of a price change? Now an agent can put a QR code directing the consumer to a property website where they can find the price. Directing the consumer to the website for the price as opposed to printing it on the flyer allows you to change the price without re-printing flyers.

    3) It demonstrates that the agent is tech-savvy. Even if you aren’t that tech savvy – QR Codes are EASY to pull off and gives the impression that you’re on your tech game (and you should be if you expect to survive in real estate).

    More thoughts on my blog: agentstandingout.com/blog/?p=237

  14. Neil Ferree

    November 11, 2010 at 8:14 pm

    Each of these 10 uses for QR codes are spot on. I like how Chris @TechSavvyAgent out it, in that he referred to QR codes as disposable marketing collateral. Anytime I see Google enter a space, I pay attention. They recently launched Goo.gl that both shortens a URL and generates a QR code on the fly and rudimentary analytic data is also part of their offering. Still, I find the Bit.ly platform to be more user friendly, better tracking w/ referral sites and sources and the ability to customize the shortened URL and QR code with “vanity” moniker. Not sure yet if Microsoft’s color QR code will catch on, but obviously this new tech widget will enable agents to provide Gen Y and us old dogs instant access to the info we seek on demand.

  15. Andrew Mooers

    November 21, 2010 at 6:09 pm

    Less trees killed peddling properties. Cool. Have found other colleagues implementing QR codes but not because they embrace the application. Just don’t want to be left behind and it has become the buzz word, thing to do. Herd wearing the “R” strikes again.

  16. Building Material Suppliers

    May 16, 2011 at 8:55 am

    Thanks for letting a few secrets out to us all. Not everybody wants to help and give decent tips.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Media

Could TikTok soon be banned in the U.S for privacy breaching?

(SOCIAL MEDIA) TikTok, a video content social media giant, has been deemed a potential national security risk by the U.S Federal government.

Published

on

TikTok is banned

U.S lawmakers are calling for a full investigation into TikTok, the fifteen second video app with almost 180 million downloads, after expressing concerns of a privacy breach by the Chinese government.

TikTok’s Chinese parent company, ByteDance, purchased the platform originally known as musical.ly in November 2017. Since then the social media app worth an estimated $150 billion has almost 180 million downloads in the U.S, and 800 million downloads worldwide.

According to Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, the U.S has reason to believe the Beijing-based company, ByteDance, may have been coerced into handing over data to China’s communist leaders. The app’s Founder, Zhang Yiming, and TikTok’s spokesperson responded to the accusations with the following statement: “TikTok is led by an American CEO, with hundreds of employees and key leaders across safety, security, product, and public policy here in the U.S. We have no higher priority than promoting a safe and secure app experience for our users. We have never provided user data to the Chinese government, nor would we do so if asked.”

We don’t know if we believe you TikTok.

TikTok received over 500 legal demands, including emergency requests, in the first six months of 2020. TikTok has also previously confirmed that the app stores user data on “U.S-based servers” withdrawn from phone downloads. Information includes IP addresses, messages, location information, and according to Pompeo, “sensitive information”, exposed by data breaching that disregards American rights to privacy and potentially violates national security guidelines.

Company employees may live in the U.S, but with its head of operations stationed in Beijing, pressure from the Chinese Government to provide user information is a very serious concern for Americans using the app. 41 percent of its users are part of Generation Z, a highly influential, social media-friendly age group, ranging between 16 and 24.

A sense of invincibility within this age range encourages users to use the app without caution of personal information that may be provided or derived off your phone after installation. In the past two years, social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter have also been criticized for not abiding to lawful privacy standards.

ByteDance has halted the use of its corporate office in Beijing and is looking to establish headquarters within the U.S or under new management.

The U.S. government is seriously considering banning the use of TikTok.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Facebook’s Hobbi app was a complete flop

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook seemingly has enough money to throw away projects and apps they know will fail. Hobbi is their most recent flop.

Published

on

Facebook failed Hobbi

Due to its abysmal underperformance on the App Store, Facebook is killing their new app, Hobbi, just months after its rollout in February.

Hobbi was the brainchild of Facebook’s New Product Experimentation Team, whose stated purpose is to rapidly ideate, build, and launch experimental new apps – then pull them if they aren’t successful.

Hobbi was designed to help users document their progress on their various personal projects and, well, hobbies. Complaints centered primarily on its threadbare feature offerings. Notably, Hobbi does not allow its users to browse the works of other creators through the app- it only packages media like photos and videos for sharing elsewhere.

A post on the Tech@Facebook blog states that they “expect many failures” from the NPE Team, suggesting that Hobbi was not necessarily intended to last. But you have to wonder… what is supposed to be the point of a tool like this?

Stories are a popular feature on most major social media websites, including Facebook itself. And Instagram (which is owned by Facebook) already allows its users to curate and group posts about whatever they want, including personal projects, hobbies and interests, through their story highlights.

So Facebook created a product that was already made redundant by their existing properties. What is experimental about that, exactly?

Hobbi originally drew comparisons to Pinterest. Both are like digital scrapbooks; Pinterest is a platform for content that inspires creativity, and Hobbi creates progress reports for creative undertakings.

One could also compare Hobbi to the underperforming video streaming platform, Quibi, which recently became infamous for its ostentatious ad campaign, aggressively flaunted celebrity cameos, and ultimately, its overwhelming failure.

Jeffery Katzenberg, Quibi cofounder of Disney and Dreamworks fame, blamed the coronavirus pandemic for Quibi’s flop – a questionable claim, considering just how much free time many have had to binge Netflix’s Tiger King during the lockdown.

The same could be said about Hobbi. People have been taking on projects like crazy in the time that has Hobbi been on the market. Quarantine cabin fever has us baking, crafting, painting, cleaning, and redecorating like never before. Yet Hobbi went nearly untouched.

Nobody used it because nobody needed it. Surely some cursory research would have demonstrated this?

One conclusion is that the app itself was the research – that Facebook’s NPE team isn’t really creating finished products, but rather testing the waters for potential new ones. (Could this framing be an elegant form of damage control, though? It’s easier to say “I meant to do that!” than it is to admit failure, especially in business.)

Still, creating throwaway apps in a bloated industry feels like cheating, whether it was meant for research purposes or not. There are plenty of indie app developers who create great tools with way less funding. Filling app marketplaces with lemons makes it harder for folks to find those gems.

Either way, hopefully we will see some original ideas coming from Facebook’s NPE Team moving forward, because this was clearly a disappointment.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Can Twitter ever secure data privacy, like even once?

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Twitter releases private information affecting already hurting businesses, should this even be a surprise anymore? They have a history of privacy breaches.

Published

on

twitter privacy

Dear Twitter,

I don’t know if you’ve seen the news within the past two years, but Facebook’s been under continuous scrutiny for privacy malpractices that affected millions of its users, so unless your goal is to be the next social network to infringe upon our first amendment right to privacy, I suggest you GET IT TOGETHER!

Over the weekend, users, specifically businesses, realized their billing information was being stored in their browsers cache. This is devastating news for business owners who rely on Twitter to promote their product, or stay in touch with their customers, who over the recent months have already faced monumental challenges. It is hard as a business owner to not feel this is an intentional overreach of privacy.

In an age where we have actual robots to vacuum our floors, and 3D printing, I speak for the people when I say this is unacceptable.

This isn’t the first time Twitter has been caught privacy breaching. A little over a year ago, Twitter announced that they were fixing a bug, many weren’t even aware of, that released phone numbers, location, and other personal data. AND GET THIS, even those who selected the option to keep their information private were affected, so what the hell is the point of asking us our preference in the first place?!!!

What about the time that Twitter accounts could be highjacked by ISIS and used to spread propaganda? All because Twitter didn’t require an email confirmation for account access. Or what about when Twitter stored your passwords in plaintext instead of something easily more secure. Flaws like these show a distinct ability of Twitter to just half ass things; to make it work, but not think about how to keep the users safe.

Like I said in the beginning, get it together Twitter.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!