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Squarespace: high-end web design accessible to all

While there are dozens of blogging options available, many are either ugly, or require extensive tech knowledge. Not Squarespace 6.

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squarespace website creator

squarespace website creator

Squarespace 6 website creation launched

With over 50 new features to their website creation platform, Squarespace has announced version 6, built around their LayoutEngine, a “transformative technology empowering users to create magazine-quality layouts simply by dragging and dropping content blocks onto a page.” The new platform includes mobile-ready template designs, and already has social media integration included.

Through the new features, the company’s goal is to “make high-end web design accessible to all.” Other new features include media management, a new blogging engine, Facebook page publishing, live statistics, a new commenting system, multiple author support, and 20 new templates that are fully customized.

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A shifting tech environment

“Two years ago, we saw how technologies like JavaScript and CSS3 would dramatically change the experiences people would have in the browser. With this in mind, we began conceptualizing what a modern website creation platform should look like,” remarked Anthony Casalena, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Squarespace. “Squarespace 6 is the result of that effort­, it’s the most impressive product we have ever made.”

The company said in a statement, “By developing the entire architecture internally, from the underlying server platform all the way up to the interface for users to drop an image onto a page, Squarespace is able to achieve an unprecedented level of control over the experience of creating and hosting a website. This end-to-end control allows Squarespace to deliver the best website creation tools on the web, which in turn enable the most sophisticated and modern customer websites in the industry.”

The service is only free for a 14-day trial, but when it goes into pay mode, it starts at $8 per month, and comes with 24/7 support and a free custom domain. The templates are a far cry from the templates of yesteryear, and much more high-end than the traditional template from ActiveRain or Blogger.

Sample templates

Below are just a handful of the available templates:

squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template
squarespace template

Marti Trewe reports on business and technology news, chasing his passion for helping entrepreneurs and small businesses to stay well informed in the fast paced 140-character world. Marti rarely sleeps and thrives on reader news tips, especially about startups and big moves in leadership.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Kerry Melcher

    July 24, 2012 at 4:18 pm

    drooled…

  2. Roland Estrada

    July 24, 2012 at 8:41 pm

    I’ve had a Squarespace account for two years and have never really done anything with it. It just wasn’t as easy to use as iWeb on the Mac. However, with the official rollout of Sqaurespace Version 6 on July 17th, I’m back onboard.  
     
    One thing that is easier to do in V6 is iFrames – the process of framing exterior websites within your own website, thereby helping sandboxing users to your site. The code injection is pretty simple. Sqaurespace can help you get away from crappy and cheesy agent templates that I absolutely despise and have railed against on this site. V6 is not as WYSIWYG as I would like but it is a huge step in the right direction and I think Squarespace will continue to make improvements. 
     
    Another cool thing is that Squarespace has been offering Webinars and they also have video tutorials – check out the workshops here https://workshops.squarespace.com/. You can get discount codes from podcasts like Macbreak Weekly. Sqaurespace has been known to the geek community for a few years and now is a great time to jump in and do your thing. 

  3. Megan Marshall, Charleston Real Estate Agent

    July 25, 2012 at 10:57 am

    seconded.

  4. ghostwriter

    August 21, 2012 at 6:04 pm

    Great website designs.
    https://www.carngerrish.co.uk/

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Tech News

Onboarding for customers and employees made easy

(TECH NEWS) Cohere enables live, virtual onboarding at bargain prices to help you better support and guide your users.

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onboarding made easy

Web development and site design may be straightforward, but that doesn’t mean your customers won’t get turned around when reviewing your products. Onboarding visitors is the simplest solution, but is it the easiest?

According to Cohere–a live, remote onboarding tool–the answer is a resounding yes.

Cohere claims to be able to integrate with your website using “just 2 lines of code”; after completing this integration, you can communicate with, guide, and show your product to any site visitor upon request. You’ll also be able to see what customers are doing in real time rather than relying on metrics, making it easy to catch and convert customers who are on the fence, due to uncertainty or confusion.

There isn’t a screen-share option in Cohere’s package, but what they do include is a “multiplayer” option in which your cursor will appear on a customer’s screen, thus enabling you to guide them to the correct options; you can also scroll and type for your customer, all the while talking them through the process as needed. It’s the kind of onboarding that, in a normal world, would have to take place face-to-face–completely tailored for virtual so you don’t have to.

You can even use Cohere to stage an actual demo for customers, which accomplishes two things: the ability to pare down your own demo page in favor of live options, and minimizing confusion (and, by extension, faster sales) on the behalf of the customer. It’s a win-win situation that streamlines your website efficiency while potentially increasing your sales.

Naturally, the applications for Cohere are endless. Using this tool for eCommerce or tech support is an obvious choice, but as virtual job interviews and onboarding become more and more prevalent, one could anticipate Cohere becoming the industry example for remote inservice and walkthroughs.

Hands-on help beats written instructions any day, so if companies are able to allocate the HR resources to moderate common Cohere usage, it could be a huge win for those businesses.

For those two lines of code (and a bit more), you’ll pay anywhere from $39 to $129 for the listed packages. Custom pricing is available for larger businesses, so you may have some wiggle room if you’re willing to take a shot at implementing Cohere business-wide.

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Tech News

Smart clothing could be used to track COVID-19

(TECH NEWS) In order to track and limit the spread of COVID-19 smart clothing may be the solution we need to flatten the curve–but at what cost?

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COVID tracking clothing

When most people hear the phrase “smart clothing”, they probably envision wearables like AR glasses or fitness trackers, but certainly not specially designed fabrics to indicate different variables about the people wearing them–including, potentially, whether or not someone has contracted COVID-19.

According to Politico, that’s exactly what clinical researchers are attempting to create.

The process started with Apple and Fitbit using their respective wearables to attempt to detect COVID-19 symptoms in wearers. This wouldn’t be the first time a tech company got involved with public health in this context; earlier this year, for example, Apple announced a new Watch feature that would call 911 if it detected an abnormal fall. The NBA also attempted to detect outbreaks in players by providing them with Oura Rings–another smart wearable.

While these attempts have yet to achieve widespread success, optimism toward smart clothing–especially things like undershirts–and its ability to report adequately someone’s symptoms, remains high.

The smart clothing industry has existed in the context of monitoring health for quite some time. The aforementioned tech giants have made no secret of integrating health- and wellness-centric features into their devices, and companies like Nanowear have even gone so far as to create undergarments that track things like the wearer’s heart rate.

It’s only fitting that these companies would transition to COVID assessment, containment, and prevention in the shadow of the pandemic, though they aren’t the only ones doing so. Indeed, innovators from all corners of the United States are set to participate in a “rapid testing solutions” competition–the end goal being a cheap, fast, easy-to-use wearable option to help flatten the curve. The “cheap” aspect is perhaps the most difficult; as Politico says, the majority of people have a general understanding of how to use wearable technology.

Perhaps more importantly, the potential for HIPPA violations via data access is high–and, during a period of time in which people are more suspicious of technology companies than ever, vis-a-vis data sharing, privacy could be a significant barrier to the creation, distribution, and use of otherwise crucial smart clothing.

There is no denying that the Coronavirus pandemic has accelerated, among other things, technological advancement in ways unseen by many of us alive today. Only time will tell if smart clothing–life-saving potential and all–becomes part of that trend.

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Tech News

Say goodbye to browser cookies – Google wants to give you ‘trust tokens’

(TECH NEWS) Google plans to do away with third-party cookies in favor of “trust tokens”. The question is, will they gain our trust?

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Privacy concerns should be at an all-time high with the sheer number of people working from home–something that may have been factored into Google’s recent decision to begin phasing out third-party cookies in their Chrome browser.

In doing so, Chrome would join browsers such as Safari and Firefox–two popular alternatives that have been more proactive about protecting user privacy in the past, according to The Verge.

Cookies, for those who don’t know, are small pieces of information stored on your computer by websites you visit; when third-party cookies are downloaded from these sites, they can track your activity across the internet, thus resulting in unpleasantries like targeted ads and location-based services appearing in your browser.

It’s all a little too accurate to your habits for comfort, so Google is proposing a separate solution: trust tokens.

No, trust tokens are not the newest form of currency on CBS Survivor–they’re “smart” iterations of cookies that will validate your access to a specific website without tracking you once you leave that page. This way, you get to keep your website-specific data–passwords, usernames, and preferences–without having your privacy encroached upon any more than Google already does (admittedly, that doesn’t sound like much of a change, but bear with us).

The real catch for trust tokens is that they don’t actually identify you the way that cookies do, and while some of the side effects of trust tokens may resemble cookie use–e.g., advertisers knowing you clicked on their ad–tokens are a decidedly less personal, more private way to access web content.

Google isn’t just throwing out third-party cookies as a gesture, it seems. Along with the announcement about trust tokens, Google mentioned that they plan to create more transparency around ads–specifically by allowing you to see why you’re seeing a specific ad and from whom and where the ad originated. An extension to help lend additional information about ads is also in the works.

These changes are expected to be implemented within the year. For now, though, you should stick to Firefox or Safari if you’re worried about cookies–you’ll be able to get back to your Chrome tabs soon enough.

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