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10 exceptionally creative resumes to inspire you

(Business News) Resumes are typically a standard black and white in Times New Roman, but in some fields, creativity reigns (or should). Here is some inspiration for your own resume!

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creative resume

creative resume

Creativity is meant for some, not all industries

When preparing your resume, you always want to stand out from the crowd, so yours will get noticed by the hiring manager. Many resume experts suggest that you continually refresh and reconstruct not only the content, but also the design. This can be as simple as changing the font or colors, or as complex as reworking it in its entirety to better suit your needs.

For many fields like graphic design, artists, technology, and marketing, it is acceptable, and often times expected that you take your resume above and beyond where creativity is concerned.

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This is not true of all industries of course; attempting to present a colorful, icon-rich resume when applying for a CEO position would not have the same effect as using it to apply in the education field. Here are a ten examples of exceptional creativity:

1. Bad ass artistic skills

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Rovoz Zhong and Cathlyn Vania: Both of these contain hand drawn, original, graphics and fonts to make it both personal and attention-getting. Especially in the case of the first example, by showcasing a portfolio through telling a story, employers would be more likely to take a few extra moments reading over the content before reading the next resume in a stack.

2. Fold it up!

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Candice Witpas and Dollcee Khattar: These two resumes are compact, foldable, and innovative. The novelty of being able to take a resume to go, and in fact, put in it your pocket, is an attraction in and of itself, but combined with the designs and amount of information they were able to include, make it functional, as well as innovative.

3. The whole package

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Jeff Ernst: Offers a resume in more than one way. In this creative example, Ernst creates a full package of self-promotion materials. The package contained a resume, business cards, and a self mailer. The self mailer was quite creative as well; it is a pillow pocket containing little strips of paper; each one with a detail about the person on one side and a design manifesto on the other which is a bit like a fortune cookie for employment ventures: very cool.

4. A modern infographic

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Roberta Cicerone: Gives an illustrated resume example. This resume looks a bit like an infographic, giving the person a quick, easily accessible, visual overview of your skills, job history, and education, without the need to read line after line of boring data on a stark white piece of paper. Anything that livens up a resume (again, while ensuring it is career appropriate) is a good thing.

5. Clever rap sheet

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Aidyn Anh Huynh This resume takes on the feel of a wanted poster. It quickly and humorously gives an overview of proficiency, education, and quirks, presented as a “rap sheet.” The creativity of this design, coupled with the all black layout, definitely draws the reader in and would stand out in a pile of resumes on plain cardstock.

6. A working anatomy

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Alyssa Lorfing turned her resume into a working “anatomy.” She created a graphic design of herself and then labeled each part with things she could do. Sharing her artistic skills, abilities, and history in a single graphic, give the employer and overview of not only her employable skills, but also a good idea of her graphic arts skills, since they are visually available on the resume.

7. And this one includes a maze

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Lidya Limanto: I love the design on this one. I’m not sure if it is the contrast of one side against the other, or the fact that she included a maze, but I love that everything is in pictures. Again, this one reads a bit like an infographic, but since she was seeking employment in the graphic design field, it works.

8. Hello My Name Is

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Syril Bobadilla: The use of bright colors, labels, and font make this resume visually appealing. The “Hello There, I’m Syril” label is reminiscent of the peel-and-stick name tags many of us wore and continue to wear to networking events and meetings. I also like the engagement of the checkboxes under “hire me.”

9. So extravagant

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Luca Polizzotto: This design caught my eye because it is so different. The dark theme with the contrasting gold is engaging somehow because it is so rich. It seems a bit extravagant. I also liked that he charted his software and personal skills at the bottom. It approaches the delivery of boring facts, in a more familiar “tech” manner.

10. And of course, BEER

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Brennan Gleason: When all else fails, promote yourself on beer. Seriously. (Again, probably not the best idea for many fields, but a novel idea nonetheless).

Apply these ideas to any visual project

While these examples are specific to resumes, the same principles can be applied to almost any project: keep your ideas fresh, do not be afraid to mix things up, and sometimes stepping outside the box can give you the best results. Keep your specific field in mind, however, to avoid embarrassment, but a new layout, or a spot of color here and there can liven up a presentation of facts and figures.

Favorites selected from an article by The Neo Design.

Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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Business News

Proven, clear-cut strategies to keep your company’s operations lean

(BUSINESS) Keeping your operations lean means more than saving money, it means accomplishing more in less time.

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The past two years have been challenging, not just economically, but also politically and socially as well. While it would be nice to think that things are looking up, in reality, the problems never end. Taking a minimalist approach to your business, AKA keeping it lean, can help you weather the future to be more successful.

Here are some tips to help you trim the fat without putting profits above people.

Automate processes

Artificial intelligence frees up human resources. AI can manage many routine elements of your business, giving your team time to focus on important tasks that can’t be delegated to machines. This challenges your top performers to function at higher levels, which can only benefit your business.

Consider remote working

Whether you rent or own your property, it’s expensive to keep an office open. As we learned in the pandemic, many jobs can be done just as effectively from home as the workplace. Going remote can save you money, even if you help your team outfit their home office for safety and efficiency.

In today’s world, many are opting to completely shutter office doors, but you may be able to save money by using less space or renting out some of your office space.

Review your systems to find the fat

As your business grows (or downsizes), your systems need to change to fit how you work. Are there places where you can save money? If you’re ordering more, you may be able to ask vendors for discounts. Look for ways to bring down costs.

Talk to your team about where their workflow suffers and find solutions. An annual review through your budget with an eye on saving money can help you find those wasted dollars.

Find the balance

Operating lean doesn’t mean just saving money. It can also mean that you look at your time when deciding to pay for services. The point is to be as efficient as possible with your resources and systems, while maintaining customer service and safety. When you operate in a lean way, it sets your business up for success.

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Business News

A well-crafted rejection email will save both your brand and your time

(BUSINESS) Job hunting is exhausting on both sides, and rejection sucks, but crafting a genuine, helpful rejection email can help ease the process for everyone.

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Woman sitting at computer with fingers steepled, awaiting a rejection email or any response from HR at all.

Nobody likes to hear “no” for an answer when applying for jobs. But even fewer people like to be left in the dark, wondering what happened.

On the employer side, taking on a new hire is a time-consuming process. And like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re going to get when you put out ads for a position. So once you find the right person for the role, it’s tempting to move along without further ado.

Benn Rosales, the CEO and co-founder of American Genius, offers an example of why that is a very bad call.

Imagine a hypothetical candidate for a job opening at Coca Cola – someone who’s particularly interested in the job, because they grew up as a big Coke fan. If they get no response to their application at all, despite being qualified and sending follow-up emails, their personal opinion of the brand is sure to sour.

“Do you know how much effort and dollars advertising and marketing spent to make [them] a fan over all of those years, and this is how it ends?” Rosales explains. This person has come away from their experience thinking “Bleep you, I’ll have tea.”

To avoid this issue, crafting a warm and helpful rejection email is the perfect place to start. If you need inspiration, the hiring consultants at Dover recently compiled a list of 36 top-quality rejection emails, taken from companies that know how to say “no” gracefully: Apple, Facebook, Google, NPR, and more.

Here’s a few takeaways from that list to keep in mind when constructing a rejection email of your own…

Include details about their resume to show they were duly considered. This shows candidates that their time, interests, and experience are all valued, particularly with candidates who came close to making the cut or have a lot of future promise.

Keep their information on file, and let them know this rejection only means “not right now.” That way, next time you need to make a hire, you will have a handy list of people to call who you know have an interest in working for you and relevant skills.

Provide some feedback, such as common reasons why applicants may not succeed in your particular application process.

And be nice! A lack of courtesy can ruin a person’s impression of your brand, whether they are a customer or not. Keep in mind, that impression can be blasted on social media as well. If your rejections are alienating, you’re sabotaging your business.

Any good business owner knows how much the details matter.

Incorporating an empathetic rejection process is an often-overlooked opportunity to humanize your business and build a positive relationship with your community, particularly when impersonal online applications have become the norm.

And if nothing else, this simple courtesy will prevent your inbox from filling up with circle-backs and follow-up emails once you’ve made your decision.

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Business News

Ageism: How to properly combat this discrimination in the workplace

(BUSINESS) Ageism is still being fought by many companies, how can this new issue be resolved before it becomes more of a problem?

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Ageism void

Workers over the age of 55 represent the fasting growing sector in labor. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that 25% of the labor force will be over age 55 by 2024. A 2018 AARP survey found that over 60% of the respondents reported age discrimination in their workplace. The figure is even higher among older women, minorities, and unemployed seniors. Age discrimination is a problem for many.

Unfortunately, age discrimination lawsuits aren’t uncommon. We have covered cases for Jewel Food Stores, Inc., Novo Nordisk, Inc., AT&T, and iTutorGroup, all alleging age or disability discrimination in some form or fashion. This could be from using vocabulary such as “tenured,” hiring a younger employee instead of promoting a well-season veteran, or pressuring older employees with extra responsibilities in order to get them to resign or retire early.

How can your organization create an age-inclusive workforce?

It is difficult to prove age discrimination but fighting a lawsuit against it could be expensive. Rather than worrying about getting sued for age discrimination, consider your own business and whether your culture creates a workplace that welcomes older workers.

  1. Check your job descriptions and hiring practices to eliminate graduation dates and birthdates. Focus on worker’s skills, not youthful attributes, such as “fresh graduate” or “digital native.” Feature workers of all ages in your branding and marketing.
  2. Include age diversity training for your managers and employees, especially those that hire or work in recruiting.
  3. Support legislative reforms that protect older workers. Use your experience to create content for your website.

Changing the culture of your workplace to include older workers will benefit you in many ways. Older workers bring experience and ideas to the table that younger employees don’t have. Having mixed-age teams encourages creativity. There are many ways to support older workers and to be inclusive in your workplace.

What steps are you taking in your organization to reduce ageism in your workplace?

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