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10 exceptionally creative resumes to inspire you

(Business News) Resumes are typically a standard black and white in Times New Roman, but in some fields, creativity reigns (or should). Here is some inspiration for your own resume!

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creative resume

Creativity is meant for some, not all industries

When preparing your resume, you always want to stand out from the crowd, so yours will get noticed by the hiring manager. Many resume experts suggest that you continually refresh and reconstruct not only the content, but also the design. This can be as simple as changing the font or colors, or as complex as reworking it in its entirety to better suit your needs.

For many fields like graphic design, artists, technology, and marketing, it is acceptable, and often times expected that you take your resume above and beyond where creativity is concerned.

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This is not true of all industries of course; attempting to present a colorful, icon-rich resume when applying for a CEO position would not have the same effect as using it to apply in the education field. Here are a ten examples of exceptional creativity:

1. Bad ass artistic skills

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Rovoz Zhong and Cathlyn Vania: Both of these contain hand drawn, original, graphics and fonts to make it both personal and attention-getting. Especially in the case of the first example, by showcasing a portfolio through telling a story, employers would be more likely to take a few extra moments reading over the content before reading the next resume in a stack.

2. Fold it up!

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resume
Candice Witpas and Dollcee Khattar: These two resumes are compact, foldable, and innovative. The novelty of being able to take a resume to go, and in fact, put in it your pocket, is an attraction in and of itself, but combined with the designs and amount of information they were able to include, make it functional, as well as innovative.

3. The whole package

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Jeff Ernst: Offers a resume in more than one way. In this creative example, Ernst creates a full package of self-promotion materials. The package contained a resume, business cards, and a self mailer. The self mailer was quite creative as well; it is a pillow pocket containing little strips of paper; each one with a detail about the person on one side and a design manifesto on the other which is a bit like a fortune cookie for employment ventures: very cool.

4. A modern infographic

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Roberta Cicerone: Gives an illustrated resume example. This resume looks a bit like an infographic, giving the person a quick, easily accessible, visual overview of your skills, job history, and education, without the need to read line after line of boring data on a stark white piece of paper. Anything that livens up a resume (again, while ensuring it is career appropriate) is a good thing.

5. Clever rap sheet

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Aidyn Anh Huynh This resume takes on the feel of a wanted poster. It quickly and humorously gives an overview of proficiency, education, and quirks, presented as a “rap sheet.” The creativity of this design, coupled with the all black layout, definitely draws the reader in and would stand out in a pile of resumes on plain cardstock.

6. A working anatomy

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Alyssa Lorfing turned her resume into a working “anatomy.” She created a graphic design of herself and then labeled each part with things she could do. Sharing her artistic skills, abilities, and history in a single graphic, give the employer and overview of not only her employable skills, but also a good idea of her graphic arts skills, since they are visually available on the resume.

7. And this one includes a maze

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Lidya Limanto: I love the design on this one. I’m not sure if it is the contrast of one side against the other, or the fact that she included a maze, but I love that everything is in pictures. Again, this one reads a bit like an infographic, but since she was seeking employment in the graphic design field, it works.

8. Hello My Name Is

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Syril Bobadilla: The use of bright colors, labels, and font make this resume visually appealing. The “Hello There, I’m Syril” label is reminiscent of the peel-and-stick name tags many of us wore and continue to wear to networking events and meetings. I also like the engagement of the checkboxes under “hire me.”

9. So extravagant

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Luca Polizzotto: This design caught my eye because it is so different. The dark theme with the contrasting gold is engaging somehow because it is so rich. It seems a bit extravagant. I also liked that he charted his software and personal skills at the bottom. It approaches the delivery of boring facts, in a more familiar “tech” manner.

10. And of course, BEER

beer resume
Brennan Gleason: When all else fails, promote yourself on beer. Seriously. (Again, probably not the best idea for many fields, but a novel idea nonetheless).

Apply these ideas to any visual project

While these examples are specific to resumes, the same principles can be applied to almost any project: keep your ideas fresh, do not be afraid to mix things up, and sometimes stepping outside the box can give you the best results. Keep your specific field in mind, however, to avoid embarrassment, but a new layout, or a spot of color here and there can liven up a presentation of facts and figures.

Favorites selected from an article by The Neo Design.

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Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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Business News

How to conduct a proper informational interview

(CAREER) Informational interviews comprise a technique in which you ask an employer or current employee to explain the details of their job to you. Try doing this before you transition into your next occupation!

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At some point in your career, you may ask for someone’s time to do an informational interview — a process in which a job-seeker asks questions about a field, company, or position in hopes of receiving information which will inform both their decision to go into the field and their responses to the specific job’s actual interview. Since the power dynamic in an informational interview can be confusing, here are a few tips on how to conduct one. Not how to obtain one, but how to conduct one once both parties agree to connect.

The process of an informational interview typically starts with finding a person who works in your desired field (and/or location if you have a specific company in mind) and setting up a time during which you can ask them a few questions about things like their job responsibilities, salary, prerequisites, and so on. Once you’ve set up a time to meet in person (or via Skype or phone), you can proceed with putting together a list of questions.

Naturally, you should understand the circumstances under which asking for an informational interview is appropriate before requesting one. Your goal in an informational review should be to ask questions and listen to the answers, NOT pitch yourself as a potential hire. Ever. Nobody appreciates having their time wasted, and playing on your contact’s generosity as a way into their company is a sure way for your name to end up on their blacklist.

Once you’ve set up an informational interview, you should start the conversation by asking your contact what their typical day is like. This is doubly effective: your contact will most likely welcome the opportunity to discuss their daily goings-on, and you’ll be privy to an inside glance at their perspective on things like job responsibilities, daily activities, and other positive aspects of their position.

They’ll also probably detail some drawbacks to the position — things which usually aren’t explained in job postings — so you’ll have the opportunity to make a well-informed decision vis-à-vis the rigors of the job before diving head-first into the hiring process.

After your contact finishes walking you through their day, you can begin asking specific questions. However, unless they’ve been unusually brief in their description of their duties, your best course of action is probably to ask them follow-up questions about things they’ve already mentioned rather than asking targeted questions you wrote without context. This will both indicate that you were listening and allow them to expand upon information they’ve already explained, ensuring you’ll receive well-rounded responses.

You should save the most specific questions (e.g., the most easily answered ones) for the end of the interview. For example, if you want to know what a typical salary for someone in your contact’s position is or you’re wondering about vacation time, ask after you’ve wrapped up the bulk of the interview. This will prevent you from wasting the initial moments of the interview with technical content, and it may also keep the contact from assuming a strictly material motive on your part. And be willing to ask “what does someone with your job title typically earn in [city]?” instead of their specific take-home salary which might not be reflective of the norm (plus, it’s rude, and akin to asking someone their weight).

This is also a good time to ask for general advice regarding breaking into the field, though you may want to avoid this step if you feel like your contact isn’t comfortable discussing such a topic or if you’re intending to apply as someone with experience.

Of course, you won’t always be able to meet with your preferred contact directly, especially if they work in a dynamic field (e.g., emergency services) or have a security clearance which negates their ability to answer the bulk of your questions. If this happens, you have a couple of back-up options:

1. Send an email with a list of questions to the contact, or send them your phone number with a wide-open calling schedule. This is useful if your contact has a random or on-call schedule.

2. Ask your contact if there is someone else you could connect with (it could even be their assistant).

3. Speak to the company’s HR branch to see if you can request a company-specific job requirement print-out or link. These will usually be more particular than the industry requirements. But don’t ask for something you can find yourself on the company’s Careers page online.

Nothing beats an in-person interview over a cup of coffee, but — again — wasting someone’s time isn’t a good way to receive useful information about the position in which you’re interested.

Before transitioning to your next position or career field, consider conducting an informational interview. You’ll be amazed at the amount of insider information you can glean from simply listening to someone discuss their day in detail.

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Business News

The sad truths you missed about the US Women’s Soccer Team lawsuit

(NEWS) The US Women’s Soccer team dominated headlines by suing for equal pay, but there was so much more to the lawsuit that could have a ripple effect in the business world.

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Recently, on International Women’s Day, the United States Women’s Soccer Team (USWNT) filed a lawsuit against the US Soccer Federation. The timing of the suit is not only a sign of the team continuing their decades long fight against the organization (only three months before they are set to defend their World Cup title in France), but a recognition of the symbol that they have become in the larger battle that women and other minorities are waging in order to be given the same resources as the men leading in their fields.

It should go without saying that the women’s soccer team is unparalleled in its athletic success: over the past twenty years they have won three World Cup titles and four Olympic gold medals. These players, as ESPN acknowledges, are among the most accomplished and best known women athletes in the world.

Their counterpart, the Men’s National Soccer Team, leaves much to be desired (they failed to qualify for last year’s World Cup, for example) yet they consistently receive much more support from the US Soccer Federation.

Although the pay disparity between the USWNT and the male soccer team is certainly stark, the “gains” that the women athletes are fighting for go beyond monetary compensation.

According to Mashable, “This [suit] includes how women frequently play on a dangerous artificial surfaces when the men do not, fly commercial when the men travel by more convenient, comfortable charter flights, and the alleged allocation of fewer resources to promote women’s games compared to men’s.”

As if being the best players in your sport in the world and having to share hotel rooms after getting torn apart by the seams astroturf and receiving less-than-world-class medical care wouldn’t be infuriating enough, it’s truly this final point that highlights the glaring mistreatment of the USWNT.

Without support from the US Soccer Federation, not only in the form of payment but in promotion of their games and general good-will toward their players, the USWNT will not be able to grow their following so that they can establish a consistent revenue near what the men’s team attracts. This “lack” of revenue continues to create the chicken/egg excuse that the Federation has for not propping up the USWNT like they deserve.

It’s simply the opposite of “sportsmanship” for the US Soccer Federation to use these players’ love of playing the game (that, again, they are the best in the world at) and their country as a way to gaslight them into playing for less.

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Think about automating tasks instead of replacing workers

(BUSINESS) Automation is great, unless you obsess over it and try to cut down on payroll – there’s a smarter approach that successful businesses take.

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automating tasks not people

The concept of automating your workflow is a tempting one — especially as payroll continues to be one of the evergreen highest costs of business. However, in contemplating how to streamline your workflow, you may do better to step back from the idea of “replacing workers” and instead think about you can optimize your existing employees by strategically tweaking their workflow.

As Ravin Jesuthasan and John Boudreau write in The Harvard Business Review, if the goal of automating is to ensure that your company is operating at its most cost effective and efficient levels, then chances are you’d still need knowledgeable employees to help you scale and capitalize.

Where automation can truly help your business is by transforming the ability of your organization to focus on the tasks that truly require a human touch or deep knowledge. For example, automation will not help your employees perform complex, interactive, or creative work like collaborating with clients to come up with solutions or designs.

However, it can help the process of brainstorming or co-designing these solutions easier by replacing some of the mechanical tasks that aid this high-level workflow.

For example, it may be helpful to automate basic research tasks for your designers. If your designers must create a client profile to help them launch their projects — basic information must surely exist at some other point in the process before this point. Maybe your firm has an intake form or contracts where a basic description of the goal of the contracted service has been created. By automating the sharing of that data between departments, perhaps in a content management system, you’d be able to free up time that the designers might spend on basic data collection so that they could instead use it for their more complex, empathetic work.

Jesuthasan and Boudreau offer up other advice for thinking about which specific tasks within your company’s workflow are the best candidates for automation.

Is a task simple? Routine? Does it require collaboration?

These kinds of inquiry are not only useful when thinking about your organizational processes, but they are good refreshers for thinking about the individual value and skills that your organization and its workers offer clients.

So instead of looking at how to cut down on payroll, consider automation as an option to improve the value you’re getting from your team, and freeing them from mind-numbing tasks that have nothing to do with their expertise. Win-win!

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