Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

The American GeniusThe American Genius

Opinion Editorials

Society expects consumerism and minimalism, causing a conflict

(OPINION) Minimalism and consumerism is in conflict with many Americans today. Our culture expects both, particularly the millennial generation, and the conflict causes feelings of inadequacy in so many.

productivity minimalism entrepreneurs freelancer-desk-work

Curse of stuff

My room is a trash hole. Every surface is covered in trinkets, drawings, sticky notes, pens, and stuff. Just so much stuff. It’s great that I can afford all that stuff, but horrible that it’s consuming my living space.

bar
Indexed’s graph on “The curse of stuff” below attempts to chart social class based on freedom in relation to possessions. As someone who falls solidly in the middle class, the graph plots me at minimal freedom, maximum stuff.

Shouldn’t more stuff signify more freedom? Nope.

There’s a dichotomy I face as a young adult: more stuff means I’m doing well financially, but achieving a Pinterest-perfect minimalistic display of said stuff or lack thereof speaks to a higher level of emotional wellness.

[clickToTweet tweet=”I’ve been hexed with consumerism & minimalism. Compelled to want more – expected to live frugally.” quote=”I’ve been hexed with the dual curses of consumerism and minimalism. I’m compelled to want more while simultaneously expected to live frugally.”]

Curse of consumerism

Compulsive consumerism drives most of my purchases. I’m perpetually talking myself down from buying more things. But if I find myself in a craft store, I either have to keep my wallet in the car or leave with a bag full of products I end up misplacing within a week.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

I feel compelled to buy new things, but more specifically, to want to buy new things. It seems like being able to purchase a twenty pack of my favorite pens in every conceivable color is a mark of my success in this world. Or at least an indication of my above-minimum wage financial success.

And then I feel guilty. I feel guilty for buying things I don’t use and for wanting things. I feel guilty for my seeming inability to maintain a clean room up to adult human standards. I feel guilty for spending money on something that isn’t groceries or a self-improvement class.

Curse of minimalism

The guilt turns into a desire for change. I want to follow the righteous path of my peers who managed to achieve minimalist lifestyles after reading some book everyone keeps talking about.

I try to berate myself into action. How am I ever going to be a world traveler or even move somewhere else if I have to lug all my possessions everywhere?

[clickToTweet tweet=”How do I invite people over if my room looks like a ten-year-old was left to fend for himself?” quote=”How am I supposed to invite people over if my room looks like a ten-year-old was left to fend for himself for way too long?”]

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

I took a class about organizing my life and was so inspired that I got rid of carloads of things. I felt proud of myself for finally donating, recycling, and generally evicting all the stuff clogging up my room.  My junk was consolidated to a single box. Which is still sitting in my closet. And is now overflowing. Guilt has once again invited itself to the party.

Lifting the curse

I feel trapped by having so much junk, then ashamed about not being grateful for my ability to purchase said junk.

It is certainly from a place of privilege that I even have the problem of too much stuff.

While there is an amount of freedom that comes from unburdening yourself from excess possessions, it’s equally important to consider the financial freedom already afforded to be in that position.

Hopefully I can find a wizard to lift the curse from the land, freeing us all from the burden of stuff. In the meantime, let’s reevaluate our attitudes towards the accumulation and management of possessions.

#CurseofStuff

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
Written By

Lindsay is an editor for The American Genius with a Communication Studies degree and English minor from Southwestern University. Lindsay is interested in social interactions across and through various media, particularly television, and will gladly hyper-analyze cartoons and comics with anyone, cats included.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: The real reason millennials spend less on retail, more on experiences - The American Genius

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisement

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Advertisement

KEEP READING!

Business Entrepreneur

Decluttering or minimalism In a blog post I read recently, the author breaks down the difference between “decluttering” and “minimalism.” For many, the difference...

Opinion Editorials

(EDITORIAL) Want to buy yourself a pick-me-up? Have you thought of all the ramifications of that purchase? Try to avoid splurging on it.

Opinion Editorials

(OPINION / EDITORIAL) Minimalism doesn't have to mean throwing out everything this instant - you can get similar benefits from starting on smaller spaces.

Opinion Editorials

(EDITORIAL) You don’t have to ditch your couch and all but one cushion to be a minimalist. Try applying minimalist thinking to your job...

The American Genius is a strong news voice in the entrepreneur and tech world, offering meaningful, concise insight into emerging technologies, the digital economy, best practices, and a shifting business culture. We refuse to publish fluff, and our readers rely on us for inspiring action. Copyright © 2005-2022, The American Genius, LLC.