Connect with us

Business Entrepreneur

10 digital business books to download for Androids

Published

on

Goals for 2012

With the new year approaching, one of your resolutions may be to better your business or even finally create and found the business of your dreams. One of the best ways to become inspired and motivated is to learn from the greats that came before, the small business professionals who have made something of themselves and their visions. In honor of enhancing and improving your business, here are ten digital business books that you can buy for your Android device.

Entreleadership

1. Entreleadership: 20 Years of Practical Business Wisdom from the Trenches by Dave Ramsey- This book is for the small business professional who wants to make more of his/her business. Dave Ramsey shares his secret of turning his “one-man show to a multimillion-dollar business.” He believes that the only way to create success of a small business, and potentially turn that small business into a large successful company, is to have the business owner be a “hard-charging entrepreneur” and a “motivating, encouraging leader.” The combination of those two traits is what makes the difference, according to Dave Ramsey.

Two-Second Advantage

2. The Two-Second Advantage: How We Succeed by Anticipating the Future—Just Enough by Vivek Ranadive and Kevin Maney – Have you ever wondered what differentiates you and the world’s greats, like athletes, musicians, and, of course, successful business owners and CEOs? According to Ranadive and Maney, it all has to do with the ability to anticipate outcomes and events before they ever happen.  This book will encourage you to anticipate the needs of your customers and any problems that you may run into. If you can accomplish it, Ranadive and Maney believe you can improve your business and reach the top.

We First

3. We First: How Brands and Consumers Use Social Media to Build a Better World by Simon Mainwaring – Can one small change really make a big difference in the health and vitality of your small business? Simon Mainwaring thinks so. Just by implementing the professional use of social media, you can “earn consumer goodwill, loyalty and profit.” And as you know, loyal customers enable your small business to thrive. Throughout his book, Mainwaring gives case studies from large companies, including Whole Foods, Nike, and Coca-Cola.

Change Management

4. 10 Steps to Successful Change Management by George Vukotich – Any business owner knows that change is inevitable. And one little change can destroy or improve a business. This is especially true if the change is out of your control. However, Vukotich doesn’t believe you, as a small business owner, should give up when change comes your way. In ten steps, you can manage change effectively, learn from it, and understand why it’s happening.

Start Something

5. Start Something That Matters by Blake Mycoskie – Nothing makes going to work easier and helps you work harder than when you love what you do. Mycoskie believes that “you don’t have to be rich to give back and you don’t have to retire to spend every day doing what you love. You can find profit, passion, and meaning all at once—right now.” You can make a difference, make a profit, and enjoy what you do every day. What could be better than that?

Lean Startup

6. The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries – If you’re a founder of a startup or several startups, there may be a new approach to business you’ll want to consider. Ries asserts that most startups don’t find success and they fail, but most of these failures are completely preventable. This book discusses how you, the startup founder and business owner, should stop creating extensive business plans and focus your attention to the creating and managing of your vision.

Gang Member to Multimillionare

7. Nothing to Lose, Everything to Gain: How I Went from Gang Member to Multimillionaire Entrepreneur by Ryan Blair – The author, Ryan Blair, “knows about building a business from the ground up.” While reading this book, you will learn how to be a hard-hitting entrepreneur. Some of Blair’s philosophies include having no sympathy for employees who aren’t making the cut, no matter how hard they say they’re trying, and that “most business plans aren’t worth the paper they’re written on.” If you’ve been looking for a blatantly and brutally honest book for small business owners, this might be it.

Thank You Economy

8. The Thank You Economy by Gary Vaynerchuk – Consumers are no longer voiceless. Social media and social networking platforms have given consumers back their voices. Social media is how the modern world is sharing experiences and opinions with and about businesses—both large and small. The actions and intentions of businesses have never been as visible as they are now. Customers demand “authenticity, originality, creativity, honesty, and good intent.” Customers also want one-on-one attention. Social media makes that possible. Vaynerchuk teaches you how to make that happen.

Leadership is Dead

9. Leadership is Dead: How Influence is Reviving It by Jeremie Kubicek – Self-preservation is a human trait that is universal. However, this universal human trait is the enemy to the “most potent professional asset on the planet”—influence. No longer should you guard and protect your ideas. It’s now the time to influence others through your business practices. Be a leader. Succeed. Kubicek believes that putting his ideas in motion will make you the leader you’ve always wanted to be.

Content Rules!

10. Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebook, Webinars ( And More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business by Ann Handley and David Meerman Scott – The right web content can encourage customer loyalty. And with so many platforms available these days, it has never been easier to connect with customers and potential customers. But it’s more than just having accessible content on the internet. It’s about having the right content, bold content. While Handley and Scott teach you how to create and administer this essential content, they also showcase case studies for even more emphasis of how the right content can make a world of difference for your small business.

The key is to pick and choose the ideas to improve small businesses that make sense to you, that inspire you. Not all of the above ideas and concepts will work for you. Try a few new methods, but remember to listen to your intuition. With that combination, you’ll be well on your way to small business success in 2012 and for many years after.

AGBeat is not affiliated with any aforementioned author.

The American Genius Staff Writer: Charlene Jimenez earned her Master's Degree in Arts and Culture with a Creative Writing concentration from the University of Denver after earning her Bachelor's Degree in English from Brigham Young University in Idaho. Jimenez's column is dedicated to business and technology tips, trends and best practices for entrepreneurs and small business professionals.

Business Entrepreneur

Is this normal (you wonder about your business)?

(ENTREPRENEURIALISM) It can be lonely not being able to openly ask potentially embarrassing questions about your business – there’s a way to do it anonymously…

Published

on

facebook

Entrepreneurialism is wildly rewarding – you are fully in control of the direction of your company, and you’re solving the world’s problems. But it’s also isolating when you’re not sure if what you’re experiencing is normal.

Sure, there’s Google, news networks (like ours), and professional connections to help you navigate, but sometimes you just want to know if something simple you’re seeing is normal.

Is Instagram Stories really where it’s at? Probably not if you’re a consultant.

Is it normal for an employee to attempt to re-negotiate their salary on their first day? Nope, but how do you keep the desirable employee without being bullied into new terms?

Do all entrepreneurs spend their first year in business as exhausted as a new parent? Sometimes.

You have questions, and together, we can share our experiences.

We have a brand new Facebook Group that is already wildly engaging, active, and you’d be amazed at how selflessly helpful people are – and we invite you to be one of them.

Want to anonymously ask a question about something you’re unsure is normal or not?

Click here to submit your question, and we’ll select as many as possible to discuss in the Facebook Group!

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Amazon on a collision course with politicians as they strengthen their monopoly

(BUSINESS) E-commerce has come a long way in the last decade, specifically led by Amazon, but are their controlling ways putting them on a collision course with regulators?

Published

on

amazon

In March, Amazon stopped replenishing weekly purchase orders for tens of thousands of vendors in a move that has stirred up some trouble. The tech giant has once flexed its power over first-party sellers over their platform. And it’s not the first time.

Amazon originally sent out to vendors as an automated message citing the hold up in orders as a technical glitch. The following day, vendors were told the change was permanent. The affected vendors were categorized as making $10 million or less in sales volume per year and not having managers at Amazon. Vendors selling specialized goods that were difficult to ship were also a factor.

The effects can have remarkable effects on the market as Amazon’s algorithms decide who is able to sell what to whom via their near-ubiquitous platform. According to John Ghiorso, the CEO of Orca Pacific, an Amazon agency for consultation and manufacturers representatives, the decision is driven by financial data such as total revenue, profitability, and catalog size.

In a response from an Amazon spokesperson, the change was made in order to improve value, convenience, and selection for customers. The mass termination of purchase orders and the delayed response from Amazon herald the transition to the One Vendor system, putting vendors in an exclusive relationship with Amazon. This system will merge the current Seller Central and Vendor Central.

Amazon’s message is loud and clear: they will do what’s in their best interest to mitigate the market for their convenience. One may be reminded of the anti-trust lawsuit against Microsoft in 2001.

The lack of warning didn’t do them any favors either.

While smaller businesses need to change for Amazon’s program, first-party business will revolve around larger brands like Nike with whom Amazon is maintaining a relationship.

Despite the streamlined platform Amazon is going for, the company wields power over vendors and customers alike. Capitalism is one thing, but monopolies are a whole other ball game, and politicians are finally paying attention.

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

Culture Codes is the guide you need for company culture questions

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) One of the biggest sellers of a company to a prospective employee or customer is their culture. Culture Codes has compiled some the biggest companies cultures in convenient decks for you to study and align with.

Published

on

culture codes

Organizational culture is a hot button of conversation. While a variety of definitions exist, one way of defining Culture is the way businesses exist – a summary of values, rituals, and organizational mythology that helps employees make sense of the organization they work in.

Organizational cultures are often reflected in Mission, Vision, and Value statements of organizations.

What many entrepreneurs or new organization struggle with as well, is how to create a culture from the ground up. What kinds of statements and values do they advocate? What are areas of focus? Who are our competitors and what can we do to create a service, product, or quality advantage?

Building a strong culture can be challenging, but a good place to start is looking at the best cultures around.

A new resource by Tettra, Culture Codes, has everything you could want to know on different companies their cultures available for you to study up.

Over 40 companies employing over 280,000 employees have created culture decks and collected core values and mission statements. Companies like Spotify, Netflix, LinkedIn, and NASA have all contributed information.

This information is great for young companies or entrepreneurs to start building a schema about what kind of culture they want to create.

Or existing established companies can look towards peers and competitors and help decide what statements they want to engage culture change on.

For job seekers, Tettra can help potential employees gauge if they are a fit for an organization, or discover that maybe an organization they dream about working for has a culture they may not jive with. And perhaps most valuably, transparently showing off your culture and allowing it to be compared means that organizations can better compete in the talent market.

Recruiters should be obsessed with talking about culture – because it keeps people in the door.

The reasons why people leave employment: work/ life balance, poor treatment, lack of training, or relationship issues with a supervisor or boss; in many ways are a by-product of organizational culture. If you want to compete in the talent market, make culture a selling point and show it off in everything you do.

Even consumer’s benefit from learning about an organization’s culture – values that indicate a commitment to excellence in ethics make consumers feel good about supporting an organization.

It pays to have a good culture. I encourage you to head over to tetra.co/culture-codes and see how companies like Etsy are keeping it real, every day.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!