Connect with us

Business Finance

Is retirement now just a pipe dream?

(FINANCE) A new survey offers bleak insight into our attitudes toward our future retirements (or lack thereof).

Published

on

retired couple retirement

A recent international survey revealed people’s true thoughts and concerns about what retirement will look like for them — if it happens at all — and the results are disheartening, yet not surprising.

The ING International Survey Savings 2019 polled 15,000 people from 15 countries around the world, asking them questions about their current financial situations, their savings and their plans for retirement. Their answers pulled back the curtain on the current — and future — economic state of affairs for workers.

What They Said

More than 60 percent of Europeans and Americans polled in the survey admitted to being worried about having enough money for retirement. Perhaps thanks to these worries, more than half of Europeans and 64 percent of Americans expect they’ll need to keep earning money in some way after they hit retirement age.  

It’s Already Happening

Many so-called retirees over 65 are already working past their workforce “expiration date” and contributing to the economy in some unexpected ways. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 8.9 million people over the age of 65 were still working in 2016, a 35 percent jump over 2011. According to Barron’s, the number of workers ages 65-74 is expected to grow by more than 4 percent every year through 2026.

Not All Bad News

It seems some of these older workers are still working by choice, not purely out of financial desperation. The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that more than a quarter of new entrepreneurs in 2016 were ages 55-64, a 10.7 percent jump since 1996. And some companies (although, not all) are beginning to take notice of the benefits of an older workforce. Older workers often have more experience, are dependable and productive, and can serve as mentors to younger employees.

What Can You Do Right Now?

Nearly 30 percent of Americans and Europeans in ING’s survey revealed they have zero savings put away. Don’t let that be you.

Take a deep breath and don’t let the big, scary future keep you from making progress toward your goals. Start by downloading beginner-friendly apps like Acorns, which helps you automatically invest small amounts of money with every purchase, or the extremely easy-to-use You Need a Budget, which can help you get a better sense of where your money is going every month. And there are several more options for investing and saving and budgeting apps out there to get you started.

Of course, you can’t predict the future. But taking a few simple steps now can help give you the power over when — or if — you decide to retire.

Staff Writer, Krystal Hagan holds a bachelor of journalism from the University of Texas at Austin. She lives the full-time RV life just outside Austin, Texas, with her musician partner, three dogs, and a six-toed cat. In her free time, she binges TV shows, brandishes her otherwise useless pop-culture knowledge at trivia nights, and tries to become BFFs with every animal she meets.

Business Finance

How business owners should handle the trend of COVID-19 surcharges

(BUSINESS FINANCE) COVID-19 has caused a lot of money problems, but some places have decided to counter this with new surcharges, and hopefully they told customers about them.

Published

on

COVID-19 surcharges

Hidden surcharges have long been a subject of discussion among consumers. Banks, car dealers, hotels, and credit card companies are much more transparent than they once were. According to a 2019 survey by Consumer Reports, 85% percent of adult consumers were hit by an unexpected fee when paying for a service, so the practice is not completely gone. With COVID-19, some businesses are turning to surcharges to balance out their profit margins.

Can businesses add a COVID surcharge legally?

The impact of COVID-19 is continuing to unravel. FOX8 reports that a Missouri steakhouse and sushi restaurant included a surcharge related to the rising costs of food under the pandemic. A CBS affiliate in Midland, TX reminds consumers to check their bills, because restaurants and salons are adding surcharges. Some businesses are saying that state restrictions are increasing operational costs, while others relate it to the cost of goods. Even UPS has added surcharges to peak delivery slots. According to a librarian at the State Law Library, a private business in Texas has a lot of leeway in deciding what to charge.

A surcharge isn’t necessarily price gouging

In Texas, price gouging following a natural disaster is illegal. The surcharges that we’re discussing aren’t price gouging, just a way for businesses to temporarily raise prices without changing their menu or listing new prices. The Houston BBB recommends that if your business does add a surcharge, it should notify consumers about the charge before the bill arrives. Consumers who believe that they’ve been a victim of price gouging should file a complaint with the Texas Attorney General.

Transparency is part of good customer service

According to Consumer Reports, 96% of the consumers surveyed were annoyed with a hidden fee. I want to talk to the 4%, and find out why they weren’t. A surcharge under COVID-19 conditions can make sense. Cleaning and sanitizing takes time and money. Prices have increased. What’s bad business is trying to hide those surcharges until after the customer checks out. That’s not fair. Be transparent.

Continue Reading

Business Finance

Tool simplifies vendor payments, saves small businesses tons of time

(BUSINESS FINANCE) Melio is a B2B payment platform that simplifies bill payment for small businesses while freeing up their cash flow. Quick and easy, even from your phone.

Published

on

Melio homepage

Designed to maximize cash flow and consolidate the complications of paying bills and vendors, the startup Melio could be a big boost for small businesses.

The way this payment workflow tool works is that it lets you pay any vendor –including those who do not accept credit cards- using a bank transfer, or check mailed on your behalf for B2B payments.

Specializing in small business payments, accounts payable, accounts receivable, online payments, and business to business payments; it is free to send and receive payments using bank transfers/ ACH but credit card payments incur a 2.9% fee.

The onboarding is straightforward, including integration and automatic sync with QuickBooks, which is essential for many small businesses. Lots of online customer reviews via Trustpilot and other sites claim that Melio is user friendly with responsive, human customer service. Melio fills the gap between the bill payer who wants to use a credit card to pay a bill, and the biller, who wants to receive their money as simply as possible, and without credit card fees. Many small businesses have to manage the challenge of payments to purveyors such as utilities and landlords that do not accept credit cards, or want to deal with the associated merchant fees.

Melio and bill payment services allow businesses who prefer to use a credit card for payment to do so. For a small business who could really use the float and cash flow of a 21-day billing grace period of a credit card, or using a card with a sweet rewards program, this could be a valuable option.

Melio does not have a mobile app to download, but it is described on the meliopayments.com website as having a mobile-friendly, responsive web app easily-managed across devices. Most of the reviews seem to confirm the user-friendliness of this tool, and the few poor reviews I have seen involved requests from Melio for compliance documents that were not satisfied by businesses, and resulted in undelivered payments. With more than 2 years since its founding, Melio is continuing to grow and cater to the needs of small businesses in the United States who want to streamline their accounts payable process.

Continue Reading

Business Finance

Politicians reconsider PPP rules too cumbersome for small businesses

(BUSINESS FINANCE) The PPP loans may have some changes coming soon, to help small businesses even more by extending the time they have to spend the money.

Published

on

loan changes

Congress has reported talks over fixing parts of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a key program designed to help businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. Changes could range between small tweaks to an overhaul of program requirements. Congress remains divided over a phase four relief bill (passed in the House last week) which includes several of those PPP changes.

The PPP was created to provide forgivable loans to businesses with fewer than 500 employees. Although the Treasury is continuing to offer updated guidance, any significant changes will require approval from Congress.

One of the major potential changes is an extension to the eight-week time frame for businesses to spend their loan money. Senator Marco Rubio (R.-Fla.) is advocating the change. He told reporters “I think the more important thing to change is the time frame in which they can use it for,” Rubio told reporters. “We do need to give them more time to spend those monies.” The hope is to pass those changes before the first PPP loan recipients reach their deadline in early June.

Other changes proposed in the House bill include extending the spending time period to 24-weeks and eliminating the requirement for 75 percent of loan spending on payroll in order to qualify for full forgiveness. The flexibility could allow recipients to allocate money towards rent, another challenge facing small business owners. While Senate Republicans haven’t shot down that option, they’ve voiced concern on the spending rule which was originally designed to keep workers employed. Meanwhile, Democrats argue for flexibility which could support businesses with fixed costs. Both sides are open to discussing a 50 percent payroll and 50 percent additional cost breakdown in a new PPP changes.

The Small Business Administration has reported $195 billion from the $310 billion of the second tranche of PPP has been approved. With no defined plan to reopen the country, small businesses are counting on relief programs. Senior White House advisor Kevin Hassett has said the government can’t continue to lend money to businesses indefinitely. “It is something we can do through Jun, I would, guess if there’s enough cash for that.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!