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33 Pinterest knockoffs: some will thrive, Pinspire will fail

As Pinterest increases in popularity, so do the number of sites that are “inspired” by Pinterest. Some will thrive as they tackle specific challenges, but the clones will fail to innovate and be left behind.

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Pinterest knockoffs taking off

Pinterest is a fascinating startup not only because the visual bookmarking site has been around for nearly two years and many believe it is brand new, but because it has inspired so many knockoffs. It is easy to say they will all fail because they don’t have the traffic, funding or notoriety of Pinterest, but it is a little more complicated than that.

Many of the Pinterest clones will fail because they are nothing more than clones, but there are a select few that solve problems that Pinterest has yet to overcome, for example Gentlemint which is aimed at male users that are overwhelmed by how many women users are on Pinterest (86 percent of American users are female), or Wanelo that successfully adds the social shopping element to Pinterest.

These niche sites are inspired by Pinterest rather than a knockoff, as Pinterest has inspired web design to focus on visual sharing via tiles. They did not invent this design, no, even Blogger has offered a tile layout for the last year, and designers have been toying with tile design for years, particularly with portfolio sites. Pinterest simply made popular the idea, refined it and has gone mainstream.

Below are 33 sites, some inspired by Pinterest, others a near replica. The sites that are solving a problem with Pinterest or do something Pinterest cannot or will not do (like porn) will likely thrive, while the cheap knockoffs like Pinspire which offer nothing new will fail. Crowds will flock to the real thing where the rest of the crowd is, and that continues to make improvements, while the copycat will remain behind with a small demand, just like Foakley sunglasses or Prahda bags in mall kiosks.

33 Pinterest clones:

  1. Alibaba, Chinese social shopping.
  2. Chill, a Pinterest for video.
  3. Discover, a Pinterest for designers.
  4. Everplaces, a Pinterest for the real world
  5. Fyndesters, a Pinterest for art and design.
  6. Gentlemint, a Pinterest for gentlemen.
  7. GetVega, a Pinterest for compulsive listers.
  8. Gtrot, a Pinterest for travel and deals.
  9. Hunuku, a Pinterest for families.
  10. I Wanna Nom, a Pinterest for recipes.
  11. Kulisha, a Pinterest for social commentary.
  12. LittleMonsters, a Pinterest for Lady Gaga fans.
  13. Loverly, a Pinterest for weddings.
  14. Manteresting, a Pinterest for men.
  15. MarkPic, another Chinese social sharing clone.
  16. Minglewing, a Pinterest for discussion.
  17. PinClub.com, a Pinterest for “sexy stuff” (aka porn).
  18. Pingram, a Pinterest for Instagram.
  19. Pinspire, an exact replica of Pinterest.
  20. Reclip.it, a Pinterest for deals.
  21. Singterest, a Pinterest for Singapore.
  22. Snatchly.com, a Pinterest for porn.
  23. SnipIt, a Pinterest for news.
  24. SparkRebel, a Pinterest for fashion.
  25. Stylepin, a Pinterest for fashion.
  26. Sworly, a Pinterest for music.
  27. Tailored, a Pinterest for weddings.
  28. TheComplete.Me, a Pinterest for dating.
  29. TheFancy, a Pinterest for shopping, deals.
  30. Thinng, a Pinterest for things.
  31. Trippy, a Pinterest for travel.
  32. Wanderfly, a Pinterest for travel recommendations.
  33. Wanelo, a Pinterest for shopping.

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The American Genius and sister news outlet, The Real Daily, and has been named in the Inman 100 Most Influential Real Estate Leaders several times, co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Drew Meyers

    April 2, 2012 at 9:19 am

    Don’t people want to do anything original yet? Actually create something of their own?

    It seems not.

    • Lani Rosales

      April 2, 2012 at 4:52 pm

      I just can’t imagine feeling good about working at a company that has cloned another. At least change it up like Gentlemint!

  2. julie

    April 2, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    what about the main pinterest competitor juxtapost.com?

  3. Anders Roth

    April 2, 2012 at 4:19 pm

    This one launched just a few days ago — pretty nice though actually.

    punchpin.com – it’s Pinterest for guys. Big question is really tho, will guys use a site like this the same as women do at Pinterest?

  4. josh

    April 11, 2012 at 3:15 pm

    I think Rivitr.com will not fail. Its not going to be a clone, rather a redone social network like Facebook, but only better, and visually driven like Pintrest but better!

  5. JONGA

    October 18, 2012 at 4:10 am

    Don’t forget pinterestheaven.com =)

  6. JONGA

    October 18, 2012 at 4:12 am

    PinterestHeaven.com glad it’s not on the fail list, awesome site and concept.

  7. RomeoAlentini

    October 20, 2012 at 5:21 pm

    https://pinanimals.net
     
    The only original largest animal pinboard online !

  8. Lori

    February 9, 2015 at 4:16 pm

    Now that Pinterest is loading the feed with 50% or more ads (“picked for you”) lots of people will be searching for an alternative. Pinterest broke pinterest; now we need an alternative.

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Social Media

Can you legally monitor your employees’ online activities? Kinda

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Are they ways you are monitoring your employees online even legal? Did you know there are illegal methods? Yep.

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Edward Snowden’s infamous info leak in 2013 brought to light the scope of surveillance measures, raising questions about legality of monitoring tactics. However, the breach also opened up broader discussion on best practices for protecting sensitive data.

No company wants to end up with a data breach situation on their hands, but businesses need to be careful when implementing monitoring systems to prevent data loss.

Monitoring your employee’s activity online can be a crucial part of safeguarding proprietary data. However, many legal risks are present when implementing data loss prevention (DLP) methods.

DLP tools like keystroke logging, natural language processing, and network traffic monitoring are all subject to federal and state privacy laws. Before putting any DLP solutions in place, companies need to assess privacy impact and legal risks.

First, identify your monitoring needs. Different laws apply to tracking data in transit versus data at rest. Data in transit is any data moving through a network, like sending an email. The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) requires consent for tracking any data in transit.

Data at rest is anything relatively immobile, like information stored in a database or archives. Collecting data at rest can fall under the Stored Communications Act (SCA), which typically prohibits unauthorized access or disclosure of electronic communications.

While the SCA does not usually prevent employers from accessing their own systems, monitoring things like Gmail accounts could get messy without proper authorization.

Who you’re tracking matters as well regarding consent and prior notification. If you’re just monitoring your own employees, you may run into disclosure issues. Some states, like Delaware and Connecticut, prohibit employee monitoring without prior notice.

The ECPA also generally prohibits tracking electronic communication, but exceptions are granted for legitimate business purposes so long as consent is obtained.

Monitoring third party communications can get tricky with wiretapping laws. In California and Illinois, all parties must be notified of any tracking. This can involve disclosures on email signatures from outbound employee emails, or a broad notification on the company’s site.

Implied consent comes from third parties continuing communication even with disclaimers present.

If you’re wanting to install DLP software on personal devices used for work, like a company cellphone, you could face a series of fines for not gaining authorization. Incorrect implementation may fall under spyware and computer crime laws.

With any DLP tools and data monitoring, notification and consent are crucial. When planning monitoring, first assess what your privacy needs are, then identify potential risks of implementing any tracking programs.

Define who, where, and why DLP software will apply, and make sure every employee understands the need for tracking. Include consent in employee onboarding, and keep employees updated with changes to your monitoring tactics.

Protecting your company’s data is important, but make sure you’re not unintentionally bending privacy laws with your data loss prevention methods. Regularly check up on your approaches to make sure everything is in compliance with monitoring laws.

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What you need to know about Facebook’s collaborative stories

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook now allows Groups and Events to craft collaborative stories – here’s what you need to know.

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If you’re like me, you’ve never posted a story on Facebook. Many of you probably don’t even realize that Facebook got in the story game last year in an effort to compete with Snapchat and (sort of, maybe?) Instagram (even though they own it). Facebook is doing its best to change that by creating a more robust story experience that they hope will expand the networking possibilities of the already abundantly popular site.

Stories on Facebook seemed like a bit of a headscratcher at first, it seems like everyone has had enough story experience between their Snapchat and Instagram accounts, but according to Facebook, they plan on surpassing Snapchat’s capabilities by adding a number of features to boost usage.

Users of Facebook Groups and Events can now contribute to a Facebook story exclusive to the group’s members and can be controlled by admins. Their idea is that this could add excitement and momentum for social meetups, weddings, or parties. These collaborative stories will function similar to a hashtag, only it will be accessible only by those involved in the event or group.

While Snapchat has a group feature, you have to add members like a group chat, where Facebook’s idea gives the story feature a more open-ended scope that reaches a large amount of people where exclusivity is optional, rather than the purpose. Facebook is enabling groups based on hobbies, professions, locations, and ideologies to create their own niche content where you can go to blow off some steam or connect with people who love the same things you do.

Just think, you’ve always wanted to post a video into the Riverdale Facebook page arguing over Archie’s real age, now you can rant away without typing a word! Rather than spar with words, you can pontificate about Game of Thrones theories with all the gusto you can muster, emotions and all!

What was once lost in text will be lost no more.

Facebook will be giving page admins ultimate control over what gets posted or not, similar to how a page’s News Feed currently works. To encourage posting, Facebook has moved a bubble to the top of every event page for easy access.

Proving that they are serious about the future of collaborative stories, Facebook is working on integrating stories across the app instead of just throwing it in as a half-hearted extra for you to roll your eyes at. With Stories’ new abilities, users will be able to hit different groups and encourage sharing opportunities unavailable to Snapchat users. Rather than just liking or sharing a post you like, you’ll be able to share your opinion on the spot. Whether or not that’s a good thing is yet to be seen (troll on trollers!).

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Facebook wants your nudes now to protect you from revenge porn later

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook, attempting to get in front of revenge porn, is requesting that users send in all of their nudes.

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In a heroic and totally innovative attempt to combat revenge porn, Facebook has come up with the following solution: “PM US UR NUDEZ.”

No seriously. They want your nudes.

But don’t worry, they’re only going to be viewed by a small group of people for manual confirmation of said nudes, and then stored temporarily… for reasons.

That part gets a little fuzzy. Some sources report that Facebook isn’t actually storing the images, just the links. This is meant to convert the image to a digital footprint, known as a hash, which is supposed to prevent the content from being upload to Facebook again.

Others say Facebook only stores the images for a short period of time and then deletes them.

What we do know, is this is a new program being tested in Australia where Facebook has partnered with a small government agency known as e-Safety and is requesting intimate or nude photos that could potentially be used for revenge porn in an effort to pre-emptively prevent such an incident.

Revenge porn is basically when someone uploads your personal and private photos online without your consent. Rather than address the issue of whether or not it’s such a good idea to take photos on a mobile, hackable device, it’s better to just send a large corporation all your nudes… through their Messenger app. /sarcasm

For your protection.

According to the commissioner of the e-Safety office, Julie Inman Grant, however, they’re using artificial intelligence and photo-matching technologies… and storing the links!

If this isn’t convincing enough, British law firm Mishcon de Reya LLP wrote in a statement to Newsweek, “We would expect that Facebook has absolutely watertight systems to guard the privacy of victims. It is quite counter-intuitive to send such intimate images to an unknown recipient.”

Oh, she wasn’t joking.

I’m not sure how many people still hold onto old intimate photos of themselves, but I am doubtful that it’s enough for this to really be effective as it only prevents intimate photos from being shared on Facebook. At least that’s the plan.

Reactions to this announcement have largely been met with amusement and criticism ranging from commentary on Mark Zuckerberg and Co. being total pervs, and theories of shared Facebook memories: “”Happy Memories: It’s been 1 Year since you uploaded 47 pictures of you in your birthday suit”!

Either way, I can only imagine someone’s inbox is flooded with crotch shots right now, and Zuckerberg has a potential new industry in the works.

Just sayin’.

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