Connect with us

Social Media

Twitter is nixing TweetDeck for Windows

Twitter is set to end support for one of their most popular apps: TweetDeck for Windows. Here’s when and why they’re ending support for TweetDeck.

Published

on

Twitter for “power users”

If you are a heavy Twitter user, chances are you’ve heard of and used TweetDeck. TweetDeck is a great dashboard application that lets you manage your Twitter account(s) like a pro. Unfortunately, if you’re a Windows user, Twitter has announced their intention to end support for TweetDeck Window app, beginning April 15th.

bar
This move will force PC users to rely on the web version instead of the standalone app they’ve become accustomed to. TweetDeck was intended for Twitter power users, allowing users to see and organize posts by mentions, notifications, and lists. With the elimination of the standalone Windows app, PC users will have to adapt to the not-as-viewer-friendly version on the web.

Why nix the standalone app?

post, Amy Zima, project manager, stated they want “to better focus on enhancing your TweetDeck experience.”

They also stated they’d, “been working on infrastructure projects like [TweetDeck] to ensure we have a stable foundation to continue improving [it] in the future.” While Twitter is adamant nothing is changing about TweetDeck itself, merely how you access it; longtime TweetDeck fans will probably notice a few differences in the layout and organization.

Don’t panic yet

According to Twitter’s blog post, users should be automatically logged into the TweetDeck Chrome and Mac apps as long as you’re on twitter.com or Twitter’s analytics page. This should allow for faster access to the new TweetDeck. Also, Twitter gave instructions on how to pin the web version of TweetDeck to your Windows taskbar, but this may not be as useful, especially if you’ve gotten used to the standalone app. For one, the readability in the web view isn’t the same as the standalone app, but it is better than losing the capability altogether. You may remember the iOS and Android app version were also nixed, so in a way, in makes sense for Twitter to end the Windows app as well.

Perhaps, by offering TweetDeck in one place, Twitter will be able to offer more relevant, timely, updates to the service. What do you think about Twitter’s decision to nix the Windows app?

#TweetDeck

Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Corrigan

    March 23, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    I’m not surprised that they’re getting rid of the desktop Tweetdeck programs, because their support for it has been godawful for years. It *still* doesn’t have proper animated GIF support, but on the other hand, it doesn’t have a lot of the garbage features that web Twitter has, like Moments and Sponsored Tweets.

    It’s a shame that Twitter killed the API for third party apps, because I’d love to see an open source TweetDeck clone.

    • Lani Rosales

      March 23, 2016 at 3:53 pm

      We’re hearing that very sentiment from a lot of people. Oh well, I guess.

  2. nollet

    March 23, 2016 at 3:32 pm

    “According to Twitter’s blog post, users should be automatically logged into the TweetDeck Chrome and Mac apps as long as you’re on twitter.com or Twitter’s analytics page.” Already the case and it’s a disaster for multi users….
    The great utility of tweetdeck for community manager is to have one tool for all accounts. Now I can’t use tweetdeck with my all accounts and see in tweeter others. Very bad news

    • Lani Rosales

      March 23, 2016 at 3:53 pm

      Right!? We predict some pretty crazy “OOPS” moments for the next few weeks as people adjust….

  3. Matthew Hall

    March 24, 2016 at 8:23 am

    As a long term, Windows based standalone Tweetdeck app user, I’m fine with this migration. However, my default and very preferred browser is Firefox. Is there a way to force clicks on links in the Chrome based Tweetdeck to open in FFox instead of Chrome? Looking for magic!

    • Lani Rosales

      March 24, 2016 at 10:17 am

      We’re not sure of the magic, Matthew, but we’ll ask around!

    • Lani Rosales

      March 24, 2016 at 10:59 am

      Matthew, we DID hear one suggestion that might work: “My suggestion would be to change the default browser preference to Firefox while using TweetDeck then you can always switch it back. That’s not the best fix, but it may work.”

      • Matthew Hall

        March 24, 2016 at 11:07 am

        Thanks. That’s a bit cumbersome and it appears that I will have to go with Chrome for now until some other deep, dark,black magic reveals itself! Thanks for the quick reply.

        • Lani Rosales

          March 28, 2016 at 10:17 am

          Sorry we’re only partially magic 🙁

  4. Lynn

    June 2, 2016 at 5:02 am

    I hate not having the desktop version of Tweetdeck. I miss it&TBH,it worked a LOT better. Plus,it was much more convienient for me,than the web version. I have been having so many issues,glitches&problems on the web version(one of said issues,is it crashes my browser constantly&sometimes several times a day,where the desktop version never did that&another issue,is DM conversation is near impossible as it freezes up,after a few messeges),that I never had on the desktop version. Plus,I now have to be on the web,to use it,whereas with the desktop version,I did’nt have to worry about it,just click the pinned tab&I’m there&tweeting,no logging onto the web to access it,or anything else. I don’t see how they thought forcing us to use the web version,is better/more convienient than using the desktop version,but I personally don’t think it is,at all. I think the desktop version should have at least been made/left an option to choose if you wanted to use it,rather than force people to have only one way to use Tweetdeck. I like Tweetdeck/Twitter&used to love it,but all their constant changes(this one definately included)is sadly making me begin like it less&less&become more frustrated with it,as time goes on. \:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Media

Why your Instagram follower counts might be jacked

(SOCIAL MEDIA) What’s going on with Instagram follower counts? It’s a v-day bug, of course!

Published

on

Instagram

Yesterday, I did what I usually do on Instagram – peruse through my own profile because I enjoy my photos. Though my follower count is nothing to write home about, I was confused when I noticed I had lost about 10 followers and had mysteriously unfollowed about the same number of people.

To quote Alicia Silverstone in Clueless, “I was like, totally buggin’”. Turns out, bug was the operative prefix as a bug was cause for the issue, and many users were feeling the bite.

TechCrunch shared that Instagram confirmed the bug was the problem causing follower counts to change. The social media platform also said that the issue should be resolved by 9 a.m. PST on Valentine’s Day (because the only love worth celebrating is that of your follower count!)

At first, many users, myself included, assumed that the decrease in followers came from an attempt from Instagram to remove fake spam accounts. However, when we noticed that our following count had also gone down, that was when people took to Twitter to complain.

One user wrote, “so I just lost like 4K on Instagram and it unfollowed like 100 people within a matter of minutes? what’s going on [whining emoji] like I’m not mad about my follower count cause I’d rather have less spam followers and better engagement but like why is it unfollowing people?!”

Instagram also used Twitter as a way to explain the issue, which is where they shared that the problem should be fixed by Thursday morning. “We’re aware of an issue that is causing a change in account follower numbers for some people right now. We’re working to resolve this as quickly as possible,” the company tweeted on February 13. “Update: we’re expecting to have this issue resolved by 9 a.m. PST tomorrow. We understand this is frustrating, and our team is hard at work to get things back to normal.”

My follower/following count went back to normal a few hours after I noticed the issue, but it may take just a bit longer for all users to see the counts restored.

Share with us below if this issue threw off your social media game yesterday!

Continue Reading

Social Media

Fallout from Facebook’s shady program spying on children

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook is barely even trying to be sneaky anymore, paying children to allow them to spy. Shameless.

Published

on

facebook

Facebook recently landed in hot (boiling) water when it was uncovered that Facebook has been paying teens to install a “research” VPN on their devices that would allow the tech giant to see all of the teen’s cellular and web usage, for about $20 worth of gift cards each month.

The participants were largely recruited into the program as a result of targeted Snapchat and Instragram ads, and offered participants additional incentives to refer friends into the program too.

The purpose of this Big Brother program was not to empower young minds with technological innovation, but to use all of this data to track Facebook’s competitors, keep track of emerging trends, and otherwise be creepin’ on the kids. The program reportedly went so far as to ask users to share screenshots of their Amazon order history pages.  

According to the report: “Facebook sidesteps the App Store and rewards teenagers and adults to download the Research app and give it root access to network traffic in what may be a violation of Apple policy so the social network can decrypt and analyze their phone activity.”

Oh, and if the privacy concerns of this whole program weren’t terrifying enough; it has been going on since 2016.

Almost immediately after the news broke, Apple banned Facebook’s Research VPN and shut down the iOs version of the Research app, before Facebook could suspend the program voluntarily. Apple also released a statement condemning the program and Facebook’s shady choice to hide it in the iOs Developer certificate rather than the App Store (where apps that collect personal data have been banned since last summer).

This entire debacle highlights the murky borders of online consent when children and teens are involved. Not only are teens less likely to be aware of the risks of sharing their data, but also often parental “consent” is not real. There’s no verification of parental consent; if a teen checks a box in an online form saying that they are their parent—the website is none the wiser. The same is true for many age verification processes.

If you are a real parent reading this and want to check to make sure that your teen’s not selling their personal data for pennies, you LifeHacker has instructions to help you identify whether or not they are in the program (and get them out of it!).

This entire debacle is a nice reminder that large tech companies may offer innovative services, high salaries to employees, and strange new ways of keeping in touch with people we’d probably forgotten by now, but the product is not the social networks they build.

The product that Facebook, Google, Amazon, and other giants are really interested in is data – we’ve been reporting that for over a decade now. Their treatment of people that may not even be able to consent to sharing their data highlights this narrow goal. If you a not a person, but rather a collection of market insights, what does your age matter? It’s just another variable for the algorithms (robots).

The upside of this entire debacle is that many parents previously unaware of this type of program are now talking to their children about this topic.

Further, this gives politicians more tangible evidence of why media companies like Facebook should never get a free pass for bad behavior.

Continue Reading

Social Media

We’re skeptical of FB’s reason for killing the Moments app

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Facebook is killing Moments. Turns out, most people don’t know it exists – here’s what we’ll all be missing.

Published

on

facebook moments

January was the longest year ever, amirite guys? Now all that’s over, we can finally say goodbye to toxic things like Whole 30 oversharers and, if we’re lucky, terrible products from tech giants.

I love writing about tech companies’ failed attempts at ~cool~ new products. Honestly, it’s become a personal hobby, or, dare I say, delight. Nothing warms my ice cold heart like seeing Google Glass, Google+, and the Facebook “Moments” app go up in flames.

*record screeches*

Wait, hold up… there was a Facebook Moments app? What the heck is (or was) the Moments app?

In case if you didn’t know like most people, here’s what you need to know:

Moments was originally created in 2015 as a way for Facebook users to privately share photos outside of the standard Facebook platform. The app implemented machine learning and facial recognition technology to help group photos, and then “recommended” who to share the photos with based off who was in the picture.

Get off my lawn.

If there’s anything we learned in 2018, it’s that we can totally trust Facebook with very private and personal information!

And I know what you’re thinking: why would this crappier and creepier version of Google Photos be necessary? Spoiler alert: it’s not.

In a moment of temporary sanity, Facebook announced it’s shutting down Moments and the app in its entirety on February 25th, citing a notable lack of downloads.

Here’s the interesting bit, though: no other reasons were mentioned like security or privacy concerns, and they insisted it’s pulling the plug only because not enough people downloaded it.

Considering Facebook bullied hundreds of thousands of users into downloading the app, so much so that in 2016 it was #1 in the App Store for several days, do we really believe the “no user base” excuse?

What else is going on under the hood of Moments that isn’t being revealed?

Given the recent controversies surrounding Facebook’s lack of data transparency and unethical decision making in this realm of personal data, I have a hunch something else might be behind this sudden “no downloads” rhetoric.

Only time, and perhaps another amusing congressional hearing, will tell.

In the off chance you’re one of the seven people with photos on Moments, you’ve been forewarned, and make sure to delete all of your data from it in case if Zuck pulls another Cambridge Analytica.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories