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How HubSpot’s culture code and lack of policies delight

HubSpot has laid out for the public their roadmap for standing out and retaining quality team members, and let’s just say they’re not exactly running a traditional operation.

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HubSpot stands out

HubSpot has released the above presentation on creating their company culture, proving how “uncomfortably transparent” they are as they offer their road map in public. Using traditional titles is about the only traditional move the company has made, and even that was hotly debated. To keep happy and productive employees, teams, and delighted customers, they offer unlimited vacation time, there are no offices, and everyone plays musical chairs every three months to keep things shaken up.

Their policies are almost non-existent, rather urging team members to use their best judgment – when everyone’s culture matches, judgment calls will typically be reflective of the company’s mission. This is why company culture is so important: “culture happens, whether we plan it or not.”

Presentation transcript

1. THE CULTURE CODE Creating a company we love.

2. WHAT’S CULTURE? A set of shared beliefs,values and practices.

3. WHY WORK ON CULTURE?

4. Culture is to recruiting as product is to marketing. Customers are more easily attracted with a great product. Amazing people are more easily attracted with a great culture.

5. THE INTEREST RATE ON CULTURE DEBT IS HIGH. Much higher than financial debtor technology debt. Often, crushingly high.

6. CULTURE HAPPENS. Whether we plan it or not, culture will happen. Why not create a culture we love?

7. Let’s make the company we always dreamed of. Let’s create a company that will be a great place to be from. REED HASTINGS & PATTY MCCORD NETFLIX.

8. Now, an observation…

9. PEOPLE HAVE DRAMATICALLY CHANGED HOW THEY LIVE AND WORK.

10. THEN / NOW. FOCUS Pension / Purpose, NEED Good Boss / Great Colleagues, HOURS 9-5 / Whenever, WORKPLACE Office / Wherever, TENURE Whole Career / Whatever

11. AND ALTHOUGH PEOPLE HAVE DRAMATICALLY CHANGED…

12. Many organizations operate as if they’re frozen in time.

13. They operate as if money is what matters most…

14. …as if the Internet hadn’t been invented…

15. … and as if amazing people are just happy to have a job.

16. We’re different.

17. We are HubSpot.

18. We’re creating a company we love.

19. This document is part manifesto,part employee handbook,and part diary of dreams.

20. When something is aspirational (not yet true) we try to call it out.

21. THE HUBSPOT CULTURE CODE. 1. We are as maniacal about our metrics as our mission. 2. We obsess over customers, not competitors. 3. We are radically and uncomfortably transparent. 4. We give ourselves the autonomy to be awesome. 5. We are unreasonably selective about our peers. 6. We invest in individual mastery and market value. 7. We defy conventional “wisdom” as it’s often unwise. 8. We speak the truth and face the facts. 9. We believe in work+life, not work vs. life. 10. We are a perpetual work in progress.

22. We are as maniacal about our metrics as our mission.

23. “Pursue something so important that even if you fail, the world is better off with you having tried.” TIM O’REILLY.Note: The O’Reilly Library at HubSpot is named after Tim.

24. OUR MISSION is to make the world INBOUND. We want to transform how organizations do marketing.

25. inbound is about empathy.I t’s about creating an experience people love.

26. WE BELIEVE OURS IS A NOBLE CAUSE.We help organizations grow.

27. We also reduce spam, junk mail and other unpleasantness.

28. We are passionate about our mission. It has earned us the love of thousands. We’re also maniacal about metrics and reaching our goals. It has earned us the resources to further our mission.

29. Balancing this dual personality of mission & metrics is challenging. But it’s also what makes us DIFFERENT.

30. And sometimes dysfunctional.

31. One way we balance these things is to have a guiding goal that serves the mission.

32. Our guiding goal is delighting customers.

33. We obsess over customers, not competitors.

34. Have the courage to start with the customer. My biggest regrets are the moments that I let a lack of data override my intuition on what’s best for our customers. ANDREW MASON. FORMER CEO OF GROUPON IN HIS DEPARTURE EMAIL

35. FOR EVERY DECISION WE SHOULD ASK OURSELVES: “Selves, what’s in it for the customers? Will this delight them?” In other words…

36. SFTC. Solve for the customer. Not just their happiness, but their success.

37. We sometimes often have SFTC to remind ourselves of this. Solve for the customer. Not just their happiness, but their success.

38. WAIT. Does “Solve For The Customer” mean just giving more away for free? Wouldn’t that delight customers? NO. To delight customers in the long-term, we have to survive in the short-term. Because…

39. Bankrupt companies don’t delight their customers.

40. All other goals should support our guiding goal.

41. We have a professional sales team. Does hitting our sales goals support our guiding goal?

42. YES. Having delighted customers requires having customers. (funny how that works) We’re on the path towards our Guiding Goal as long as we sell to customers that we expect to delight.

43. This is the key. We shouldn’t sell customers we’re not justifiably confident we can delight.

44. WE LOVE TO EDUCATE. We are enthusiastic teachers. We believe success comes through educating customers, not exploiting them.

45. We are radically and uncomfortably transparent.

46. THEN. (back in the 1900s) Power came from hoarding knowledge. Decisions were made behind closed doors. NOW…

47. Power is gained by sharing knowledge, not hoarding it.

48. “Sunlight is the best disinfectant.” -LOUIS BRANDEIS

49. WE SHARE (ALMOST)EVERYTHING. We make information available to everyone in the company.

50. We protect information only when: It is legally required. Example: Information covered under a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) It is not completely ours to share. Example: Individual compensation data

51. WE HAVE THE MOST INTERESTING WIKI ON THE PLANET. *Examples of things we share and discuss:• Financials (cash balance, burn-rate, P&L, etc.) • Board meeting deck • Management meeting deck • “Strategic” topics • Lore & Mythology (the funniest page on the wiki) *Unverified claim

52. FROM

53. AND LIKE ANY MINDFUL COMPANY, WE HAVE:

54. We have open access to anyone in the company. No permission needed. Nobody has an office.

55. CULTURE HACK. A large part of the company goes through a random “seat shuffle” every 3 months. We’ve been doing this since the beginning. It reflects our “change is constant” credo. It also circumvents a lot of needless discussion.

56. The intent behind all this transparency is to support smarter behavior and better decisions. So…

57. We give ourselves the autonomy to be awesome.

58. THEN. Organizations tried to prevent mistakes with policies and procedures. NOW…

59. WE TRUST OURSELVES.

60. Just because someone made a mistake years ago doesn’t mean we need a policy. WE DON’T PENALIZE THE MANY FOR THE MISTAKES OF THE FEW. We only protect against really big stuff.

61. We don’t have pages of policies and procedures.

62. Instead we have a 3-word policy on just about everything: USE GOOD JUDGMENT.

63. Social media policy. Travel policy. Sick day policy. Buy a round of drinks at an event policy. Work from home during a blizzard policy. Our policy on all of these (and most other things): USE GOOD JUDGMENT.

64. WHAT’S GOOD JUDGMENT? Team > Self. Favor your team’s interest over your own. Company > Team. Favor the company’s interest over your team. Customer > Company. Favor the customer’s interest over the company.

65. We’re pretty good at the Company > Team first and second – but the third is tricky sometimes. Favor the company’s interest over your team. Remember, acting in our customers’ interest is in our Customer > Company long-term interest too. Favor the customer’s interest over the company.

66. Now, let’s talk about where and when we work. Generally…

67. Results matter more than the hours we work.

68. Results matter more than where we produce them.

69. Results matter more than how much vacation we take. (we have unlimited vacation time)

70. We believe in the freedom to work when,where and how we want. Remarkable results are what matter. This is what we believe.

71. But we also recognize that…

72. The biggest driver of performance in complex industries like software is serendipitous interaction. BEN WABER. VISITING SCIENTIST, MIT MEDIA LAB AUTHOR, “PEOPLE ANALYTICS”

73. So, we trust our leaders to use good judgment when guiding their teams.

74. And we try to create a work environment where we want to come in.

75. THEN. Influence based on hierarchy. Command & Control. NOW…

76. INFLUENCE IS INDEPENDENT OF HIERARCHY.

77. We want direction on where we are going… NOT detailed directions on how to get there. h/t Simon Sinek

78. We don’t want just “managers,” we want inspiring leaders. Passionate coaches. Tireless supporters. Managers exist to help individual stars make magic.

79. CEO, CTO, VP of This, Manager of That. Doesn’t matter what your title is. EVERYBODY DOES REAL WORK AND GETS THEIR HANDS DIRTY.

80. Oh, and speaking of job titles…

81. WE HAVE TRADITIONAL JOB TITLES AT HUBSPOT. It is a topic of intense debate. Options:1) No titles for anyone 2) Make up our own creative titles 3) Use traditional titles.

82. We ended up with the last option. Bummer. But, it does align with our desire to increase individual market value.

83. Back to having autonomy…

84. Awesome is as awesome does.

85. HAVING AUTONOMY DOESN’T MEAN CRAP IF YOU DON’T ACT. DON’T OVER-THINK IT. JFDI.(Just F*#king Do It)

86. With this kind of transparency and trust we can’t take chances when hiring. So…

87. We are unreasonably picky about our peers.

88. You become the average of the 5 people you hang out with. Drew Houston CEO, Dropbox Note: Drew’s a friend and on our advisory board.

89. What makes someone a great fit for HubSpot? What makes them awesome for us? What does it mean to be HUBSPOTTY?

90. There are 5 attributes that we value in people.

91. HUMBLE. Modest, despite being awesome. Self-aware and respectful.

92. Wait. Doesn’t being humble mean lacking confidence? No. The very best people are self-aware and self-critical – not arrogant. Examples: Bezos. Buffet. Berners-Lee.(and that’s just some of the Bs)

93. Humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less. -C.S. LEWIS.

94. When things go well, humble people tend to share the credit. When things go poorly, they tend to shoulder the responsibility.

95. EFFECTIVE. Gets sh*t done. Measurably moves the needle. Immeasurably adds value.

96. EFFECTIVE PEOPLE ARE: Predisposed to action. They just start doing. They have a sense of ownership. They’re resourceful and always looking for leverage.

97. Effective people find ways to have their cake and eat it too.

98. ADAPTABLE. Constantly changing. Life-long learner.

99. WAIT. What about good people that just want stability and predictability? They may do good work, but they likely won’t be happy here. Change is constant at HubSpot.

100. REMARK?ABLE. worthy of being remarked upon* Has a super-power that makes them stand out in some way. Remarkably smart. Remarkably creative. Remarkably resourceful. *h/t to Seth Godin

101. TRANSPARENT. Open and honest with others and with themselves.

102. HUMBLE EFFECTIVE ADAPTABLE REMARKABLE TRANSPARENT

103. We want people with heart. Those who will help HUMBLE us create an EFFECTIVE company we love. ADAPTABLE REMARKABLE TRANSPARENT

104. Yes, “heart” is a bit cheesy.We’re a bit cheesy sometimes.

105. WE DON’T JUST BELIEVE IN HEART,WE BET ON IT. We hire, reward, and release people based on the five attributes.

106. EXAMPLE 1: If you’re closed, arrogant and stuck in your ways, it doesn’t matter how effective you are. It’s not going to work out.

107. EXAMPLE 2: You can be remarkably smart, humble and open. But, if you’re not effectively moving us forward, it’s not going tow ork out.

108. Does this mean we only accept those that fit match the 5 attributes perfectly? No. Confucius has good advice here…

109. “Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without.” CONFUCIUS.

110. “We’re a team, not a family. We hire,develop and cut smartly so we have stars in every position.” +1 We couldn’t have said it better ourselves, so we didn’t.

111. Don’t just hire to delegate. It’s tempting to bring people in that you can push off work you don’t have time for. Hire to elevate. Bring people in that are better than you at something and you can learn from.

112. WITH GREAT PEOPLE COMES GREAT RESPONSIBILITY. Success is when a group of people achieve their collective potential. So…

113. We invest in individual mastery and market value.

114. We want to be as proud of the people we build as we are of the company we build.

115. We believe in investing to increase the individual market value of every HubSpotter.

116. We’re doing a few things already…

117. HubTalks: Learning From Leaders Clay Christensen Eric Ries Sheila Marcelo Colin Angle “Innovator’s “The Lean CEO, care.com CEO, iRobotDilemma” Startup” These are small informal talks given at HubSpot.

118. Unlimited Free Books Program. Post a comment on the HubSpot wiki requesting a book. It shows up in your Kindle account. No muss, no fuss. No expense sheets.

119. Unlimited Free Meals Program. Take someone smart out for a meal. Learn something. Expense it. No approval needed. No limits. No rules. Use good judgment.

120. THAT’S JUST THE BEGINNING. We believe in compensating fairly, but we want to invest generously in our learning and growth. We’re always looking for new ideas.

121. We compensate based on fair market value. Reality: It’s hard to know what market value is. We think of it as VORP (Value Over Replacement Player)

122. THERE ARE TWO WAYS TO PROGRESS AT HUBSPOT. 1. Gain mastery as an individual contributor and make magic. 2. Provide spectacular support to those who are doing #1. Reality: This is mostly true, but we need a quant-based approach to measuring how true it is.

123. We defy conventional “wisdom” because it’s often unwise.

124. We’d rather be failing frequently than never trying new things. #inbound12

125. Why do we care so much about being daring?

126. We start out being exceptional. As we grow, there is a dark, powerful force that pulls us towards the average. If we regress to the mean, we fail. It’s that simple.

127. Remarkable outcomes rarely result from modest risk.

128. Simplicity is a competitive advantage.

129. Things start simple…

130. THEN COMPLEXITY QUIETLY CREEPS IN. ITS TOLL LIES BELOW THE SURFACE.

131. WHY DOES COMPLEXITY CREEP IN? It is often the easy, seductive answer to short-term issues. Fighting for simplicity takes courage and commitment to the long game.

132. WHY DOES COMPLEXITY ALWAYS INCREASE? Because everyone adds complexity and nobody takes it away. Ironically, adding complexity is easy and maintaining simplicity is hard.

133. COMPLEXITY AND THE TRAGEDY OF THE COMMONS. Example: “I need to hit my goals this month, so I’m going to push for this exception to our standard contract.” Result: You may make your goal now, but we all pay the price of the complexity forever. Focus on the long game. Team over self.

134. Like software, Organizations should be frequently refactored. Refactoring means to improve internal structure without changing external behavior.

135. REFACTOR. • Pull out unused features. • Remove unnecessary rules. • Stop generating useless reports. • Cancel unproductive meetings. • Prune extraneous process.

136. We speak the truth and face the facts.

137. NO SILENT DISAGREEMENT.If we disagree with a decision or direction, we have the responsibility to speak up. We trust our candor will not be used against us.

138. We have the right to clear, candid and constructive feedback. We can ask for this at anytime. We’re replacing the traditional annual review. Favoring more frequent feedback.

139. WE LOVE DATA. We like to think our decisions are not data driven but data powered. We like to think it, but it’s not true. We are obsessed with data.

140. DEBATES ARE WON WITH DATA. Job titles don’t win debates. We disfavor pulling rank.

141. BUT WE ALSO DISLIKE INDECISION

142. Data is collected. Debates are had. THEN SOMEONE JUST HAS TO DECIDE. An imperfect decision is better than no decision. A controversial decision is better than no decision.

143. WE BELIEVE IN WORK+LIFE, NOT WORK VS.LIFE.

144. Work-life “balance” is misguided.

145. We don’t think it’s possible to be unhappy at work and then happy in life. We believe in enjoying life. We also believe in enjoying work. We believe in work+life fit.

146. WE ARE A PERPETUAL WORK IN PROGRESS.

147. We believe it takes more than talent to succeed. GREATNESS REQUIRES INTENSE COMMITMENT.

148. WE WORK IMMENSELY HARD. It’s not for everyone, but it’s part of who we are. We are on a mission to transform marketing. That’s not easy to do.

149. WE ARE NEVER DONE. Never done iterating. Never done learning. Never done rethinking.

150. THE HUBSPOT CULTURE CODE. 1. We are as maniacal about our metrics as our mission. 2. We obsess over customers, not competitors. 3. We are radically and uncomfortably transparent. 4. We give ourselves the autonomy to be awesome. 5. We are unreasonably selective about our peers. 6. We invest in individual mastery and market value. 7. We defy conventional “wisdom” as it’s often unwise. 8. We speak the truth and face the facts. 9. We believe in work+life, not work vs. life. 10. We are a perpetual work in progress.

151. WE WERE INSPIRED BY • The Netflix Culture Deck (McCord & Hastings) • “Drive” (Daniel Pink) • The Valve Employee Handbook • “Rework” (Fried and Hansson) • Google’s People Ops Team …and countless others on the web.

152. PROPS TO OUR EXTERNAL BETA USERS. They helped out despite having better things to do. • Patty McCord, Netflix Culture Deck • Rand Fishkin, SEOmoz • Joel Gascoigne, Buffer • Leo Widrich, Buffer • Hiten Shah, KISSmetrics • Jason Fried, 37signals • Garry Tan, Y Combinator • Dan Martell, Clarity • Ziad Sultan, Marginize

153. THANK YOU. Congrats for making it this far. We would love feedback and discussion: CultureCode.com

HubSpot

Marti Trewe reports on business and technology news, chasing his passion for helping entrepreneurs and small businesses to stay well informed in the fast paced 140-character world. Marti rarely sleeps and thrives on reader news tips, especially about startups and big moves in leadership.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. JoeLoomer

    March 25, 2013 at 11:47 am

    Sometimes lengthy posts lose me just due to taking so long – but this one was soooo worth it.

    Navy Chief, Navy Pride

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Business News

How the Lean concept can have the biggest impact on your bottom line

(BUSINESS) Using the Lean business concept and asking the non-sexy question of “What’s dumb around here?” your business will outpace your competitors in no time.

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overtime laws

Entrepreneurs love solving problems. That’s what they’re good at doing. In fact, the more complex, difficult and messy the problem, the more the entrepreneur will enjoy the challenge. Entrepreneurs are especially good at solving problems that nobody knew were there. Think about Steve Jobs: He knew that we needed a pocket MP3 player before we even knew what it was.

While entrepreneurs are coming up with the next “big” thing, we need the non-entrepreneurs in our organizations focused on solving the small problems in our company with the same enthusiasm. Imagine if every one of your team members were consistently looking for opportunities to improve your systems, processes and service delivery. Those subtle changes made in the non-sexy parts of the business usually have the biggest impact on the bottom line.

This is a business concept called Lean, in which a company changes their processes to create the most benefit to the customer using the least amount of resources possible. Lean is commonly used in the manufacturing industry, but its principles can be used in any business to change the way of thinking and doing things.

I recently witnessed a great example of how Lean principles were used to improve one of my clients, LuminUltra – a leading provider of microbiological testing hardware, software and services. The company serves industries that need to know quickly and accurately what’s living in their water. At a recent quarterly planning session at the LuminUltra offices in Fredericton, Canada, COO Charlie Younger shared a powerful story about the company’s manufacturing facility and challenging the status quo.

During the expansion of the company’s manufacturing facility, one of the team members was lamenting to Charlie about how much time it took to complete a lengthy step of the manufacturing process – one specific quality check that was very time-consuming. He remarked that in the history of the company they never had a single machine fail the test. Charlie’s first thought was, do they even need to perform this specific test again?

After more discussion with colleagues, the team realized that the other quality checks performed earlier in the manufacturing process would always identify a defective unit. With this knowledge, the manufacturing team asked for permission to perform minimal testing to still provide assurance with less work. When presented with the information, the company leadership agreed that it was a great idea and would save time and money as well as improve the employee experience. But the bigger question was: Why hadn’t anyone ever questioned this lengthy step of the manufacturing process before?

Charlie, having run Lean programs in the past, has seen this issue before: People continue to do what they’ve always done even if they think there is a better way. He thought this would be a great opportunity to use a fun, simple but elegant technique to capture other status quo breakers – in other words, he decided to use the same principles for changing the company’s production process to make other company decisions.

With that, he posted a whiteboard in the manufacturing room with the title “What’s Dumb Around Here?” and encouraged team members to capture possible “dumb things” to add to it. These topics are discussed and vetted during their Lean process meetings to determine if they can be improved.

When I discussed the new process with Charlie, he noted, “First, you have to create an environment where people are willing to question the status quo. We have always been highly focused on quality and accuracy, so the team thought it was outrageous to openly question a quality check we had been performing for years.”

He continued, “You have to help your management team be open to receiving ideas that might seem crazy and not overreact to the suggestions. Instead, simply ask them to explain their logic. More often than not, the front line knows a better way to do things but does not know how to navigate the change. The beauty of using Lean techniques is that you now have an easy navigation path to discuss, approve and roll out changes. Suddenly, you have an energized front line solving problems with minimal involvement from management – how great is that?”

While LuminUltra continues to grow their product line and expand into new markets, it expects that its implementation of Lean principles will help it make subtle but important modifications to processes that will positively affect its bottom line. The CEO, Pat Whalen, remarked, “If we can produce our products faster and more cost effectively and get them into the hands of our customers faster, we can have an even bigger impact on the water sector with our microbiological monitoring products. I need all of our team members thinking how we can improve every single day. The water sector needs us.”

Every visionary, big-thinking entrepreneur needs a team that challenges the status quo. How are you encouraging your team members to identify, “What’s Dumb Around Here?”

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Business News

Confessions of a productive person: keeping a clean desk

Being a productive, clean person is nowhere near as difficult as it sounds – start with these simple steps focused on reduction in your life.

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minimalism productivity

We keep a clean office, there’s no secret about that, and the desks are usually clear of papers and clutter. Some call it minimalism, others call it clean, but mostly people just call it “wow” and ask how we keep such clean lives.

Studies show that your brain is hardwired to have cluttered thought patterns when you are surrounded by clutter, yes, even those of you that live in a pile of papers (which of course you have “a system” for). It can be intimidating to even get started when you have a messy office, but there are a few things that anyone can do to regain control and help your brain function at its optimal rate, improve productivity, and prove to clients and coworkers that you mind the details like no one else.

Friends and coworkers ask me constantly how I get so much done in the average day, and it isn’t because of my smartphone, no, it’s because I am a focused workhorse. A huge part of that is keeping a very clean environment. Let’s talk about why that’s important (and why you should ignore the “buut geniuses have messy desks” bullcrap editorials).

Perhaps you put to do items on post it notes or pieces of paper, or you pile up files that need to be dealt with – one of the most common reasons desks are messy. This method of task management is ineffective and tells your brain to panic because what you’re doing right now may or may not be as important as those 35 stickies, so you either pause frequently to reflect on the dozens of other unprioritized tasks, or your brain constantly churns in the background having been distracted with this mess that represents tasks, or you simply learn to tune the noise out, which defeats the purpose of your reminder system.

To change this, either implement tech tools to manage your tasks (search this site for “task management” and see dozens of tools) or keep one pad of paper or journal on your desktop.

minimalism

Another common item on desks is what? Envelopes. One of the tricks I’ve found is that no matter the envelope, it gets torn open and processed while I’m on hold or on a conference call I don’t have to speak on. Before you leave for the day, every bill should be torn open and either dealt with, filed, or if you must keep it on your desk, have a beautiful inbox or even a clipboard to keep them all in the same spot.

There are much more sophisticated methods, but let’s face it, you have to start small to ensure good habits. The same goes for files – be smart about processing paper in your down time.

My core confession that you may have picked up on so far is that I love to trash stuff.

I didn’t used to be this way, I used to hard paper, but it is how I began my journey toward being more productive – trashing. Remember that every time you throw just one envelope away, you’re making progress that is tangible, and you should learn to enjoy that progress and associate positive feelings with keeping things clean.

What else holds you back from keeping a clean work area and focusing on your tasks for the day? Often, books pile up or files start stacking themselves up magically. I’ve found that having aesthetically appealing storage systems (boxes, filing cabinets, files, pen holders, etc.) make you feel rewarded for using them. It’s a subtle trick, but if you invest in your desk accouterments, you feel compelled to use them, which inadvertently keeps you organized.

Look, these are simple things to do – ditch sticky notes, deal with mail and files before you leave for the day, and surround yourself with beautiful tools that keep you organized. This is where it begins – instead of being addicted to hoarding crap on your desk, work on rewiring your brain to enjoy reduction.

This editorial was originally published in November of 2013.

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Business News

You absolutely don’t need to be a 100% match for a job to apply

(CAREER) Most people believe they should only apply for their dream job if they’re a perfect match, but studies say that’s the wrong approach.

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apply for a job even if not 100% a match

You don’t need to be a 100 percent match for a job to apply. You just don’t.

We’ve all seen the crazy job postings:

-Must be fluent in Mandarin
-Must be be full-stack coder
-Must also have real estate license
-Must be a rockstar ninja (uuugh)

After seeing endless open positions with specific requirements, it’s no wonder that so many job seekers become discouraged. How can anyone fit 100 percent of the requirements on the job listing? And actually, most people don’t. According to a recent study, you only need to meet ~70 percent of the job requirements to be a good fit for a job.

So you’re telling me a requirement isn’t actually a requirement?!

The study analyzed job postings and resumes for over 6,000 positions across 118 industries, and they found that applicants are just as likely to get an interview whether you meet 50 percent or 90 percent of the requirements.

Crazy, I know. That law of diminishing returns will eff you up.

But what about women? I wondered the same thing. Surprisingly, the interview data was in favor of women that meet less of the requirements. In fact, the study shows that as a female, the likelihood of getting an interview increases if you simply meet 30 percent of the requirements. Also, female applicants are just as likely to get an interview if they meet 40 percent versus 90 percent of the job requirements.

Before you start complaining that women have it better in the job search process, correlation doesn’t equal causation.

Interestingly enough, 64 percent of the female users rejected at least one job where they matched 50 – 60 percent of the requirements, while only 37 percent of male users did. This leads us to believe there more implicit factors to take into consideration, like imposter syndrome throughout the interview process.

If you’re a recruiter or employer, this may seem like more work. But in an increasingly competitive job market for both employers and applicants, this presents an opportunity to get to know people for who they actually are, not just on paper. And resumes often do a poor job of reflecting that — especially the ever-important soft skills.

Key takeaways:

As we’ve gone through this study, here are a few practical action items for job seekers:

1. Apply for a lot of jobs to increase your number of interviews.

The study shows that increased interviews are a direct result of increased applications, not just picking and choosing what you think you’re a good fit for. Which brings us to our next point:

2. Go for those “stretch” roles — you never know what may come of it!

Send in a lot of applications, but don’t let that stop you from approaching the process thoughtfully. Recruiters can tell if you’ve skimped on the cover letter or your resume, and a thoughtful approach to the application process will be noticed and appreciated by recruiters, especially for those reach roles.

3. Don’t second-guess yourself.

We’re always our own worst critics, and according to this, we don’t need to be — especially throughout the job application process. Job hunting is stressful enough, so put on your most upbeat playlist (or Beyonce), say your affirmations, and go on with your bad self and start applying!

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