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List of Austin tech companies recalling staff to the office (or not)

(BUSINESS NEWS) Many Austin tech companies were reluctant to send people home when COVID-19 hit – will they be equally reluctant to put employees back in desks?

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returning to the office (or not) in austin

The masks are coming off in America and agree with that practice or not, many employers are in an ongoing series of meetings regarding bringing staff back into the office.

Large companies are quickly playing commercial real estate hot potato – we recently broke the story that Dell had not only sold some of their massive campus near Austin, but rented out the third floor of their building to the Army Futures Command (AFC). As the dust settles on these contractions, the next step is bringing humans back into said buildings.

The spectrum of individuals’ emotions regarding this return varies from enthusiasm, to trepidatious, to complete refusal to return.

As the global pandemic hit and employers were responding so differently to sending folks home, our list of Austin tech companies sending folks home (or NOT sending employees home) went viral.

At the time, we noted that keeping humans in the office makes sense for some sectors (service, hospitality, medical, even financial), called it an “impossible situation” for business leaders, but some employers were stupidly insensitive…

One executive told workers as they were allowed to work from home to not expect it to be a “corona vacation” (which did NOT go over well).

Our question is: Will employers handle a return to the office more gracefully than when they sent folks home?

Just as protocols were untested sending employees home, as some employers get the itch to call them back into the office, a whole new set of unchartered protocols will be implemented.

What follows are quotes from employees telling us about their companies’ statuses. We will update this list over time as we learn more. If there are updates to your company’s status, let us know here.

– CDK Global

“100% return to office on 9/13. Vaccines mandatory, but no way to legally enforce that, that I know of.”

– Cognite AS

“As of June 1, remote/on-site as we wish. Fridays in-office preferred for team lunch/team building days. Must be vaccinated with shot record proof uploaded to our HR system to attend in-person events.”

– Dover Fueling Systems

“Currently it’s voluntary to go back in until some time in autumn when it will be required. Hybrid options are available. Masks are still required in the office when not able to socially distance but that might change soon.”

– EpisodeSix

“Devs and project related roles remote. HR in office. C level occasionally in office.”

-Fathom5

“Full return to work date of 6/21. Remote work on exception (heads-down, need to be at home to tend to a matter at home — cable man cometh!, sick kid, relocating).

While not company policy, I look forward to revisiting this in a few months, particularly as it relates to recruiting, and some implementations of tools to improve internal operations & culture; I expect these tactics in the office to improve working together OVER ALL. In turn, I hope to prove out conditions are met, that predict similar outcomes from working remotely.

This is the long way to say that our CEO did not have some positive experiences of WFH, which I suspect had more to do with us not doing WFH well/providing conditions for that. And, now I’m here so things will be even awesomer (technical term).”

– FEMA/DHS

“Currently 100% Telework. Plan to start coming back to office August 31, however, it has not yet been decided that everyone will return to office. Some may continue some % telework.”

– Homeward

“Our company was just getting started when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Like a lot of businesses, we shifted to remote work, thinking it would be temporary. As we grew from 20 to 200 employees remotely, we realized that a remote workforce offered a few advantages. But we recognize that in-person collaboration fosters strong relationships and sometimes makes problem solving easier. So when it makes sense to be together at our headquarters in Austin, we encourage teammates to do that, too. Employees are required to wear a mask when walking around the office or in common areas (restroom, kitchen, etc.), but masks are optional while working at a desk. Social distancing is encouraged and signage around the office denotes which seats should remain vacant.”

– Indeed

“Currently remote – working on hybrid and fully remote scheduling when offices reopen.”

“No one has to be in an office until at least September. 80% of positions have the ability to be remote or flex (part in person, part in office). Every position can be in person if desired. We are picking now (in June) what we want to do and can change our delegation one time per year.”

– inKind

“We’re back to the office since the team is vaccinated! Still have flexible WFH days but we’re excited to be able to work together again safely.”

– Lightspeed Systems

“All employees are primarily still remote, with the option to come to either office in Austin as desired for majority of employees. Masks encouraged when in common areas, but not required at desk. No plans to require in-office attendance have been expressed at this point.”

– MediaTech Ventures

“Staying remote. No need to be back in office but we would like to be back in office. Cost <> Benefit just isn’t there (which is to say, if space is vastly more affordable, we’d consider it).”

– National Instruments

“Currently: returning to the office requires manager approval with mask/capacity limits within the office
September 1: General back-to-office date with a lot of individual flexibility as to working remotely or in the office. Long-term location strategy is in progress, but will likely be a defined policy allowing a mix of remote and in-office work.”

– Netspend (a Global Payments company)

“Mar 2020—everyone remote, no exceptions, no office visits;
Aug 2020—survey sent about full-time office / hybrid office & remote/ full time remote preferences, split 1/3 in each category;
Oct 2020—closed/sold offices in San Mateo, CA, Alpharetta, GA, and downtown Austin TX (no layoffs/furloughs at any offices), talk of “return-to-office” delayed until new year;
Jan 2021—”return-to-office” talks, but decided to delay, no office visits except req’d/VP-approved personnel, masks req’d, temp scans req’d, social distancing, desks 6′ apart;
Mar 2021—”return-to-office” talks resume as COVID vaccine deployed, still req’d social distance, masks, temp scans, desks 6′ apart, etc., talk of some hybrid remote/office (flex days);
Jun 2021—”return-to-office” open season, masks/social distance optional for vaccinated employees, flex days by team determination. SOP going forward is team-by-team basis, no assigned desks (all flex/hotel stations) except Director & above.”

– NFP

“One week on, one week off since May 1 until they bring everyone back full time. No announcement yet but it can’t be far away. No masks if you’re vaccinated. Verify health status every day with an app.”

“Update: There are now discussions about future hybrid and fully remote work for teams that can do so. No definite plans yet.”

– PayPal

“Continuing with remote work until at least September. Expecting more details on the return to office plan in the next few weeks. Likely it will be a hybrid model depending on the team/business unit.”

– SciPlay

“Until the end of the year, voluntary return 1 day/week per game team at 40%. Temperature check at door. Six feet socially distanced desks and conference rooms. Deep cleaning of desks each night. Masks required. Vaccinations encouraged. Ppe provided (sanitizer, masks, wipes, gloves, etc). 2022 plan to be released soon tm.”

– StitchFix

“Fully remote CX based in Austin (90 mile radius).”

– T3

“Going back to the office September 13 with a hybrid wfh/in-office blend we are currently working on team by team. With this (and the most exciting part) we’re also figuring out meetings days or times vs no fly zones so we can all focus on working time more. Not sure about masks – I think you’d only come in office if you’ve been vaccinated. We’ve also hired a lot of people not in Austin recently, so T3 is very open to remote workers.”

– Trammell Ventures

“Remote Work still; no dates yet for coming back to the office, but there’s talk of a company picnic and/or get together soon for vaccinated employees!”

– Verb

“Currently, the office is open for those who want to use it, but not required. We’re told we’ll be hybrid but we’re still waiting to hear what the stipulations of that are.”

– VMWare

“Office not likely to re-open until September. No firm date yet. Flexibility to be in office or at home depending on type of role. Most will have a choice.”

– Whole Foods

“Starting July 1, required to be in office 2x a week, starting September 1 required to be in office 3x a week. No mask or social distance requirement but we are required to prove vaccination.”


Click here to add your company to the list or to update the information listed above.


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$100m reimagined convenience store startup to open 25 stores in 2022

(BUSINESS) Foxtrot is looking to redefine the convenience store as we know it. This startup is looking to make it a whole new experience.

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Laptop with Foxtrot convenience store locations in Chicago.

Move over 7-11, there’s a new player in town! There’s always room for competition, even in the world of convenience stores. Yes, you read that right, Quick Trip has some serious competition from a newcomer, Foxtrot.

Foxtrot is a curated, modern convenience store offering a brisk 30-minute delivery and 5-minute pick-up. It was created by Mike LaVitola and Taylor Bloom in 2014. These stores will undoubtedly be popular in walkable areas, but also with their online ordering convenience. This modern version of a convenience store offers the combination of an upscale corner store with a digital-first e-commerce platform. Sounds pretty glorious, right?

However, the original convenience store is safe as long as people are traveling and need to stop for gas or a restroom break.  If you’re from Texas, then you know and love, Buc-ee’s, the Texas-born chain. Buc-ee’s have been creating their own in-store products garnering a cult following among their customers. Still, Buc-ee’s doesn’t have an online ordering or delivery option unless it’s offered through a third party.

Foxtrot has raised $160 million in Series C funding and they are expecting to open 25 locations in many cities in 2022. There are a few different levels of funding. If a company makes it to Series C funding, they are already successful and looking to expand or develop new products per Investopedia.

According to Retail Dive, “About half of the new stores will be in Chicago, Dallas and Washington, where all of the 16 stores Foxtrot currently operates are located, LaVitola said. The tech-focused retailer is also planning to begin operations in Boston and Austin, and intends to open four or five new stores in each of those cities during the next year and a half, he said.”

Foxtrot is testing out technology equipment that would allow customers to leave the store without stopping to checkout at the counter. They plan isn’t to go entirely self-service, but as the creator LaVitola stated, “the more hours we can allocate towards sampling and storytelling and interacting with customers and less [on] tasks that don’t add on to value, like checkout, that’s great.”

Foxtrot is redefining convenience by including carefully curated products. They aim to offer local popular products as well core pantry items. They aim to make the commonly unpleasant experience of convenience stores enjoyable. Let’s hope they succeed.

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What small business owners can learn from Starbucks’ new D&I strategy

(BUSINESS) Diversity and inclusion have been at the forefront of Starbucks’ mission, but now they’re shifting strategy. What can we learn from it?

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Hands of all different skin colors on green background representing Starbucks' D&I.

Starbucks was one of many companies that promised to focus on diversity and inclusion efforts after the death of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in 2020. What sets Starbucks apart from other companies were its specific goals.

How It Started

They began with hiring targets and have now added goals in corporate and manufacturing roles. Starbucks’ plans and goals revolve around transparency for accountability. They released the annual numbers for 2021 as a way to help hold themselves accountable. The data they’ve released so far show that they’ve met nearly a third of their 2025 goals according to Retail Brew. Because of this information, we can see why they are choosing to move in the direction of manufacturing and corporate jobs. In 2021, POC’s fell to 12.5% of director-level employees from 14.3% in 2020 in manufacturing.

How It’s Going

Per Starbucks’ website stories and news, “[I]t will increase its annual spend with diverse suppliers to $1.5 billion by 2030.  As part of this commitment, Starbucks will partner with other organizations to develop and grow supplier diversity excellence globally.” To put that into perspective, they spent nearly $800 million with diverse suppliers in 2021. With these moves, by 2030, it will increase by almost double.

As part of their accountability and progress, they plan to partner up with Arizona State University to give out free toolkits to entrepreneurs on fundamentals for running successful diverse-owned businesses. Another goal they’ve listed is to boost paid media representation by allocating 15 percent of the advertising budget to minority-owned and targeted media companies to reach diverse audiences.

At the heart of all this information on their goals and future plans, data transparency and accountability are what’s forcing them to look at the numbers to make specific goals. They are doing more than just throwing money at the problem, they are analyzing how they can do better and where the money will make a difference. Something that, as entrepreneurs, we should all do.

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Business News

Peloton is back-pedaling: Reports of price increases, layoffs, and cost cuts

(BUSINESS) After a recording of layoffs leaks, ‘supply chain’ issues cause shipping increases, and they consult for cost-cutting, Peloton is doomed.

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Man riding Peloton bike with instructor pointing encouragingly during workout.

Is Peloton in Trouble?

According to many reports, Peloton had success early in the pandemic when gyms shut down. Offering consumers a way to connect with a community for fitness along with varying financing options allowed the company to see growth when many other industries were being shuttered.

After two years, CNBC reports that the company is “being impacted by …supply chain challenges” and rising inflation costs. According to the report, customers will be paying an additional $250 for its bike and $350 for its tread for delivery and setup.

As demand has decreased, Peloton is also considering layoffs in their sales and marketing departments, overheard in a leaked audio call. The recording details executives discussing “Project Fuel” where they plan to cut 41% of the sales and marketing teams, as well as letting go of eCommerce employees and frontline workers at 15 retail stores.

Nasdaq reported that the stock fell 75% last year, after a year where it soared over 400%.

Peloton reviewing its overall structure

According to another report from CNBC, Peloton is working with McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm, to lower costs as revenue has dropped and the growth of new subscriptions has slowed since the pandemic. Last November, according to NPR, Peloton had “its worst day as a publicly-traded company.” It also anticipates greater losses in 2022 than originally predicted. It makes sense that the company would reexamine their strategy as the economy changes. They aren’t the only one that is raising prices amid supply chain issues.

It will be interesting to watch how Peloton fares

Peloton has a large community that pays a monthly fee for connected fitness. While growth has slowed, the company still has a strong share of consumers. Although it is facing more competition in the home fitness market and more gyms are reopening, as Peloton adjusts to the new normal, it should remain a viable company.

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