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List of Austin tech companies recalling staff to the office (or not)

(BUSINESS NEWS) Many Austin tech companies were reluctant to send people home when COVID-19 hit – will they be equally reluctant to put employees back in desks?

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returning to the office (or not) in austin

The masks are coming off in America and agree with that practice or not, many employers are in an ongoing series of meetings regarding bringing staff back into the office.

Large companies are quickly playing commercial real estate hot potato – we recently broke the story that Dell had not only sold some of their massive campus near Austin, but rented out the third floor of their building to the Army Futures Command (AFC). As the dust settles on these contractions, the next step is bringing humans back into said buildings.

The spectrum of individuals’ emotions regarding this return varies from enthusiasm, to trepidatious, to complete refusal to return.

As the global pandemic hit and employers were responding so differently to sending folks home, our list of Austin tech companies sending folks home (or NOT sending employees home) went viral.

At the time, we noted that keeping humans in the office makes sense for some sectors (service, hospitality, medical, even financial), called it an “impossible situation” for business leaders, but some employers were stupidly insensitive…

One executive told workers as they were allowed to work from home to not expect it to be a “corona vacation” (which did NOT go over well).

Our question is: Will employers handle a return to the office more gracefully than when they sent folks home?

Just as protocols were untested sending employees home, as some employers get the itch to call them back into the office, a whole new set of unchartered protocols will be implemented.

What follows are quotes from employees telling us about their companies’ statuses. We will update this list over time as we learn more. If there are updates to your company’s status, let us know here.

– CDK Global

“100% return to office on 9/13. Vaccines mandatory, but no way to legally enforce that, that I know of.”

– Cognite AS

“As of June 1, remote/on-site as we wish. Fridays in-office preferred for team lunch/team building days. Must be vaccinated with shot record proof uploaded to our HR system to attend in-person events.”

– Dover Fueling Systems

“Currently it’s voluntary to go back in until some time in autumn when it will be required. Hybrid options are available. Masks are still required in the office when not able to socially distance but that might change soon.”

– EpisodeSix

“Devs and project related roles remote. HR in office. C level occasionally in office.”

-Fathom5

“Full return to work date of 6/21. Remote work on exception (heads-down, need to be at home to tend to a matter at home — cable man cometh!, sick kid, relocating).

While not company policy, I look forward to revisiting this in a few months, particularly as it relates to recruiting, and some implementations of tools to improve internal operations & culture; I expect these tactics in the office to improve working together OVER ALL. In turn, I hope to prove out conditions are met, that predict similar outcomes from working remotely.

This is the long way to say that our CEO did not have some positive experiences of WFH, which I suspect had more to do with us not doing WFH well/providing conditions for that. And, now I’m here so things will be even awesomer (technical term).”

– FEMA/DHS

“Currently 100% Telework. Plan to start coming back to office August 31, however, it has not yet been decided that everyone will return to office. Some may continue some % telework.”

– Homeward

“Our company was just getting started when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Like a lot of businesses, we shifted to remote work, thinking it would be temporary. As we grew from 20 to 200 employees remotely, we realized that a remote workforce offered a few advantages. But we recognize that in-person collaboration fosters strong relationships and sometimes makes problem solving easier. So when it makes sense to be together at our headquarters in Austin, we encourage teammates to do that, too. Employees are required to wear a mask when walking around the office or in common areas (restroom, kitchen, etc.), but masks are optional while working at a desk. Social distancing is encouraged and signage around the office denotes which seats should remain vacant.”

– Indeed

“Currently remote – working on hybrid and fully remote scheduling when offices reopen.”

“No one has to be in an office until at least September. 80% of positions have the ability to be remote or flex (part in person, part in office). Every position can be in person if desired. We are picking now (in June) what we want to do and can change our delegation one time per year.”

– inKind

“We’re back to the office since the team is vaccinated! Still have flexible WFH days but we’re excited to be able to work together again safely.”

– Lightspeed Systems

“All employees are primarily still remote, with the option to come to either office in Austin as desired for majority of employees. Masks encouraged when in common areas, but not required at desk. No plans to require in-office attendance have been expressed at this point.”

– MediaTech Ventures

“Staying remote. No need to be back in office but we would like to be back in office. Cost <> Benefit just isn’t there (which is to say, if space is vastly more affordable, we’d consider it).”

– National Instruments

“Currently: returning to the office requires manager approval with mask/capacity limits within the office
September 1: General back-to-office date with a lot of individual flexibility as to working remotely or in the office. Long-term location strategy is in progress, but will likely be a defined policy allowing a mix of remote and in-office work.”

– Netspend (a Global Payments company)

“Mar 2020—everyone remote, no exceptions, no office visits;
Aug 2020—survey sent about full-time office / hybrid office & remote/ full time remote preferences, split 1/3 in each category;
Oct 2020—closed/sold offices in San Mateo, CA, Alpharetta, GA, and downtown Austin TX (no layoffs/furloughs at any offices), talk of “return-to-office” delayed until new year;
Jan 2021—”return-to-office” talks, but decided to delay, no office visits except req’d/VP-approved personnel, masks req’d, temp scans req’d, social distancing, desks 6′ apart;
Mar 2021—”return-to-office” talks resume as COVID vaccine deployed, still req’d social distance, masks, temp scans, desks 6′ apart, etc., talk of some hybrid remote/office (flex days);
Jun 2021—”return-to-office” open season, masks/social distance optional for vaccinated employees, flex days by team determination. SOP going forward is team-by-team basis, no assigned desks (all flex/hotel stations) except Director & above.”

– NFP

“One week on, one week off since May 1 until they bring everyone back full time. No announcement yet but it can’t be far away. No masks if you’re vaccinated. Verify health status every day with an app.”

“Update: There are now discussions about future hybrid and fully remote work for teams that can do so. No definite plans yet.”

– PayPal

“Continuing with remote work until at least September. Expecting more details on the return to office plan in the next few weeks. Likely it will be a hybrid model depending on the team/business unit.”

– SciPlay

“Until the end of the year, voluntary return 1 day/week per game team at 40%. Temperature check at door. Six feet socially distanced desks and conference rooms. Deep cleaning of desks each night. Masks required. Vaccinations encouraged. Ppe provided (sanitizer, masks, wipes, gloves, etc). 2022 plan to be released soon tm.”

– StitchFix

“Fully remote CX based in Austin (90 mile radius).”

– T3

“Going back to the office September 13 with a hybrid wfh/in-office blend we are currently working on team by team. With this (and the most exciting part) we’re also figuring out meetings days or times vs no fly zones so we can all focus on working time more. Not sure about masks – I think you’d only come in office if you’ve been vaccinated. We’ve also hired a lot of people not in Austin recently, so T3 is very open to remote workers.”

– Trammell Ventures

“Remote Work still; no dates yet for coming back to the office, but there’s talk of a company picnic and/or get together soon for vaccinated employees!”

– Verb

“Currently, the office is open for those who want to use it, but not required. We’re told we’ll be hybrid but we’re still waiting to hear what the stipulations of that are.”

– VMWare

“Office not likely to re-open until September. No firm date yet. Flexibility to be in office or at home depending on type of role. Most will have a choice.”

– Whole Foods

“Starting July 1, required to be in office 2x a week, starting September 1 required to be in office 3x a week. No mask or social distance requirement but we are required to prove vaccination.”


Click here to add your company to the list or to update the information listed above.


Business News

Asking the wrong questions can ruin your job opportunity

(BUSINESS NEWS) An HR expert discusses the best (and worst) questions she’s experienced during candidate interviews. it’s best to learn from others mistakes.

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When talking to hiring managers outside of an interview setting, I always find myself asking about their horror stories as they’re usually good for a laugh (and a crash course in what not to do in an interview). A good friend of mine has worked in HR for the last decade and has sat in on her fair share of interviews, so naturally I asked her what some of her most notable experiences were with candidates – the good and the bad, in her own words…

“Let’s see, I think the worst questions I’ve ever had are typically related to benefits or vacation as it demonstrates that their priorities are not focused on the actual job they will be performing. I’ve had candidates ask how much vacation time they’ll receive during an initial phone screen (as their only question!). I’ve also had them ask about benefits and make comparisons to me over the phone about how our benefits compare to their current employer.

I once had a candidate ask me about the age demographics of our office, which was very uncomfortable and inappropriate! They were trying to determine if the attorneys at our law firm were older than the ones they were currently supporting. It was quite strange!

I also once had a candidate ask me about the work environment, which was fine, but they then launched into a story about how they are in a terrible environment and are planning on suing their company. While I understand that candidates may have faced challenges in their previous roles or worked for companies that had toxic working environments, it is important that you do not disparage them.

In all honesty, the worst is when they do not have any questions at all. In my opinion, it shows that they are not really invested in the position or have not put enough thought into their decision to change jobs. Moving to a new company is not a decision that should be made lightly and it’s important for me as an employer to make sure I am hiring employees who are genuinely interesting in the work they will be doing.

The best questions that I’ve been asked typically demonstrate that they’re interested in the position and have a strong understanding of the work they would be doing if they were hired. My personal favorite question that I’ve been asked is if there are any hesitations or concerns that I may have based on the information they’ve provided that they can address on the spot. To me, this demonstrates that they care about the impression that they’ve made. I’ve asked this question in interviews and been able to clarify information that I did not properly explain when answering a question. It was really important to me that I was able to correct the misinformation as it may have stopped me from moving forward in the process!

Also, questions that demonstrate their knowledge base about the role in which they’re applying for is always a good sign. I particularly like when candidates reference items that I’ve touched on and weave them into a question.

A few other good questions:
• Asking about what it takes to succeed in the position
• Asking about what areas or issues may need to be addressed when first joining the company
• Asking about challenges that may be faced if you were to be hired
• Asking the employer what they enjoy most about the company
• I am also self-centered, so I always like when candidates ask about my background and how my current company compares to previous employers that I’ve worked for. Bonus points if they’ve actually looked me up on LinkedIn and reference specifics :)”

Think about the best and worst experiences you’ve had during an interview – and talk to others about the same topic – and see how that can help you with future interviews.

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Business News

How to stop reeking of desperation when you job hunt

(CAREER) Hunting for a job can come with infinite pressures and rejection, sometimes you just want it to be over – here’s how to avoid reeking of desperation.

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desperation when job hunting

Whether you were one of the millions of people who quit their job this year in The Great Resignation or you’ve been unemployed since the pandemic began, when you’re looking for work, it can feel hopeless after a while. Just like that student in class who raises their hand at every question, you don’t want to come across as desperate, “pick me, pick me!” Money might be tight. You want to be eager, but you don’t want to be so anxious that you sabotage your job search.

Right now, job seekers have the upper hand, but you want to show off your skills and professionalism, not your neediness.

5 ways you come across as overly desperate for a job:

  1. Applying for multiple positions at the same company. Employers want you to be a fit for a particular job. Instead, tell the hiring manager that you’re open to other positions that might be a good fit.
  2. Checking in with the hiring manager too much. Follow up after an interview, but don’t keep checking in. If they have news, they’ll share it.
  3. Talking about how much you need a job. Don’t bring up your personal issues in an interview. Stay focused on why you are the best person for the job.
  4. Being willing to accept any offer. You should negotiate and go to bat for yourself when you get an offer. Explain why you’re worth more money because you probably are.
  5. Forgetting to ask questions about the bigger picture. You don’t want to be so eager to impress that you don’t think about the company culture and perks. You might be desperate, but getting into a job that doesn’t fit your needs and personality won’t help your situation.

Desperation can make you appear to be in the clearance bin at the store. Sure, you may get something for a great price, but will you actually be able to fully use it when you get it home? As a job seeker, you want to be the premium brand on the shelf. Maybe not every buyer (employer) can appreciate you or even afford you, but when the right one comes along, it’s a good fit.

Employers want team members who will be assets for their company. Your job search needs to start with a strong resume and impressive cover letter. Instead of going for quantity, choose job openings for quality, where you can bring something to the table for the company.

Ask a Manager’s Alison Green has some great resources for getting a job, including a free guide to preparing for interviews. Practice interviewing. Make a great first impression. Know that there is a job out there for you.

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Business News

Study: Employers are inadvertently punishing women that suffer from Endo

(BUSINESS NEWS) A new study reveals the widespread impact of Endo (Endometriosis) in the workforce as well as the entire economy. Change must be made. Quickly.

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Women still face many barriers in their career. It’s been more than half a century since federal law addressed gender discrimination in the workplace, but it still occurs. Whether it’s lack of access to training, an inability to speak up, or pay inequality, it’s all wrong. Sadly, a new study identifies another potential barrier to a woman’s career path – endometriosis.

What is endometriosis?

The Office on Women’s Health (OWH) reports that “endometriosis happens when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus (womb) grows outside the uterus.”

Endo, as its often called, causes varying levels of pain, often chronic pain in the lower back and pelvis. The tissue outside the uterus grows in areas where it can cause even more problems by blocking fallopian tubes and forming scar tissue. There is no cure, but there are some treatment options that can work.

Endo affects about 11% of American women who are ages 15 to 44. Despite the fact that the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology describes endometriosis as “nothing short of a public health emergency,” data suggests that about 60% of endo cases go undiagnosed.

I repeat: 60% of endo cases go undiagnosed.

More than 6 million American women are living with the symptoms of endo without knowing the cause or having the capability to manage their symptoms.

Endometriosis was once considered a career woman’s disease, but a two-year-long study from Finland shows that the disease shapes a woman’s career, not the other way around.

Women with endo take 10 or more sick days than women without endo. They also use more disability days. Other studies support these findings. A 2011 analysis reported that women with endo could lose almost 11 hours of work each week because their endo made it difficult to complete tasks. One US study estimated that women with endo experience more sick days each year, up to 20.

These women often have a lower annual salary and slower salary growth.

How can employers address endometriosis in the workplace?

It’s difficult enough to discuss any type of health problem at work, let alone one that relates to menstruation. Employers have a big problem just dealing with short-term illnesses. It’s hard when a key employee is out for one or two weeks from a surgery. Long-term chronic illnesses, especially those that are invisible, are challenging in the workplace.

Most workplace cultures aren’t designed for people with chronic conditions or disabilities.

It’s going to take a major shift in thinking to deal with endometriosis in the workplace.

Endo isn’t painful period cramps. It’s a serious condition without a cure. Employees who are dealing with endo may be battling intense pain or fatigue. Yes, work needs to get done, but when people are living with a chronic condition, they need accommodations.

Endometriosis may be a woman’s disease, but it does impact the entire economy. One study found that endo had a similar economic burden to that of heart disease or diabetes. Most employers would not think twice about a man who needed extra time to deal with coronary disease, but women often don’t get that consideration, regardless of the condition.

Women with endo aren’t incapable or shirking their duties. They may just need to deal with their pain to stay focused at work. Let’s drop the stigma and help accommodate women who deal with endo.

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