Connect with us

Conference Coverage

I Endorse BHB UnChained

Published

on

bhbunchained.jpg

We’ve all read the attacks on the BHB UnChained Conference, I’ve had a few doubts myself. But when analyzing the Conference on the whole, I must admit that it’s great for the real estate profession.

We that represent the 1st and 2nd generation of the RE Network must go out and teach what we’ve learned. What we know, and yes, admit what we do not yet know. Many of those that would join us over time as the 3rd generation will need to be armed with the knowledge we’ve amassed.

The UnChained Conference was origionally billed as an alternative to conferences that charge exorbitant amounts of money to learn basically nothing in relation to how Real Estate Web2.0 can help grow your business. Tons of cash was charged in ’07 to sell you on old technologies or contrary business models and practices. UnChained was the little guy against the machine, and regardless of what’s been said since that origional billing, I have to believe it still holds that core value. BHB has worked hard against the machine since day one, no one can doubt that.

UnChained is fundamentally a camp to bring those that are thirsty, to the water, and I believe it can and will. A beginner to internet advertising and social marketing can expect a crash course in the the unexpected and I expect the players at UnChained will deliver just that.

As a part of the 1st and 2nd Generation RE Network I can certainly understand the dismissive nature given to the Conference, but thinking back, I would have appreciated a primer just like this. An overview of the trial and error we’ve all had to suffer would have been invaluable.

I will judge the outcome of the Conference just like everyone else, but knowing the players putting on the conference, I have no doubt that their knowledge and experience will give those that are hungry, plenty to chew on.

Learn more about the Bloodhound UnChained Conference here.

I personally support any group or project that has the Agent’s Bussiness at heart. The product I endorse must be built of a desire to improve the quality of the Agent coming online. Whatever I endorse must demonstrate the value of a the Real Estate Professional- that is what Agent Genius is all about, and I believe that BHB UnChained furthers this cause.

Benn Rosales is the Founder and CEO of The American Genius (AG), national news network for tech and entrepreneurs, proudly celebrating 10 years in publishing, recently ranked as the #5 startup in Austin. Before founding AG, he founded one of the first digital media strategy firms in the nation and also acquired several other firms. His resume prior includes roles at Apple and Kroger Foods, specializing in marketing, communications, and technology integration. He is a recipient of the Statesman Texas Social Media Award and is an Inman Innovator Award winner. He has consulted for numerous startups (both early- and late-stage), has built partnerships and bridges between tech recruiters and the best tech talent in the industry, and is well known for organizing the digital community through popular monthly networking events. Benn does not venture into the spotlight often, rather believes his biggest accomplishments are the talent he recruits, develops, and gives all credit to those he's empowered.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
56 Comments

56 Comments

  1. Greg Swann

    February 29, 2008 at 12:21 pm

    Bless you, sir. Thank you.

    I hope you and Lani can come to Phoenix, too. I don’t know what plans Brian might have for you, but I would love to do a PowerPoint presentation with Lani on what does and does not work in typography and graphics.

  2. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 12:22 pm

    I found this via my Twitter feed. Why is this important? We’ll be discussing how to use ALL social media as marketing tool, at Unchained.

    I have some great announcements of new speakers, next week.

  3. Jonathan Dalton

    February 29, 2008 at 3:26 pm

    Wow.

  4. Teresa Boardman

    February 29, 2008 at 3:55 pm

    I very much support the idea of such a conference, but am not yet convinced that the BHB conference will be a good one. I will with hold judgment until I see what the sessions are going to entail and who the speakers are. There is a big difference between the BHB and the type of blog that a real estate practitioner needs to make contacts and win business. At this point it has not been demonstrated that the folks at BHB understand what is involved in blogs and social networks if the goal is to win business in the local market. It requires a different writing style and a very different style than a blog for real estate professionals.

    I am finding that there aren’t any conferences in our industry for people like me. I guess I am the first generation. For the most part I need to go outside the industry so that I can continue to learn and grow.

  5. Benn Rosales

    February 29, 2008 at 4:03 pm

    Teresa, you and I are on the same page, and I absolutely agree with you. I have some knowledge of the idea of contribution they’re looking at and that may be the missing piece of the puzzle I can’t provide.

    But I don’t feel like the first or second generation will get much out of this they haven’t already seen, tried, or conceptualized themselves. But the agent looking into the giant fish bowl from the outside should at least gain a map to get started.

  6. Teresa Boardman

    February 29, 2008 at 4:35 pm

    Benn – I am not so sure that the agent looking into the giant fishbowl will get the kind of help he or she needs. Like I said a business blog for meeting real estate clients is very different than the BHB. I am finding examples on the internet of some really bad advice being given to agents on how to write a business blog and on SEO. . . I will be patient and reserve judgment. You must have more information than I do.

  7. Chris Lengquist

    February 29, 2008 at 4:49 pm

    I’ve decided to go (and spent my money) because I’m

    1. hoping to learn something more.
    2. wanting to meet some of these people face to face. (Brian, Jeff, Geno, Russell, etc)
    3. infatuated with going to a function that half of RE 2.0 denounces.

    You know, it’s kinda funny. But RE 2.0 are almost like Democrats and Republicans wanting you to choose sides. “I’m for Dustin.” “Vote Greg.” Same goes for the SEO “experts”. I read all of’em.

    FYI: I think there are a lot of thinking independents out there. As you well know.

  8. Benn Rosales

    February 29, 2008 at 6:39 pm

    Teresa- you’re right that it comes down to the individual contributor.

  9. Benn Rosales

    February 29, 2008 at 6:40 pm

    yep @chris

  10. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 6:45 pm

    “At this point it has not been demonstrated that the folks at BHB understand what is involved in blogs and social networks if the goal is to win business in the local market. It requires a different writing style and a very different style than a blog for real estate professionals. ”

    Teresa,

    With all due respect, Teresa, you’re a blogger and use no other social media in your customer marketing efforts. You’re relatively “new” to the whole social media game. LinkedIn, MySpace, and Gather have offered customer-rich platforms to “fish” since 2004. I offered you this idea, In New York, and you dismissed my proven track record; no worries. Teresa, you’re a helluva blogger but you could do so much more.

    “I am finding that there aren’t any conferences in our industry for people like me. I guess I am the first generation.”

    Bloggers are actually 3rd generation, Teresa, and highly parochial in their efforts. This statement is telling of why bloggers are missing the boat.

  11. Jim Duncan

    February 29, 2008 at 7:30 pm

    Brian –

    Not do disagree with you, but aren’t we all relatively new to the social media arena?

    How long has it been that LinkedIn, MySpace, et al (I know you do very well in MySpace, but I just don’t get it, nor frankly, do I desire to ‘get’ MS) have been viable options for business?

  12. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 7:50 pm

    “How long has it been that LinkedIn, MySpace, et al (I know you do very well in MySpace, but I just don’t get it, nor frankly, do I desire to ‘get’ MS) have been viable options for business?”

    Since inception, Jim. LinkedIn and MySpace have been around since 2003. “Blogging” on myspace, in the groups, was quite popular in 2004-5. Mostly, the connections were made in bulletins and forums.

    LinkedIn was a large part of my 2004-5 customer acquisition strategy.

    SMM is actually ten years old. AOL and Yahoo forums were a way to acquire customers. Gosh, chatrooms were the granddaddies of them all. I remember talking to customers, in Yahoo Chats (I created a Phoenix real estate room, in 1998).

    We’re not all new to SMM, we’ve been engaged in the various media for 10 years, some of us for business.

  13. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 7:52 pm

    “I just don’t get it, nor frankly, do I desire to ‘get’ MS”

    Why? It’s a microcosm of society, now, Jim. Over half the logging in users are over 35 and have a higher median income, in every locale. Why would ANYONE dismiss a medium they know little about?

  14. Jim Duncan

    February 29, 2008 at 9:26 pm

    I made a conscious decision not to use MS, basically from a time-management standpoint. It doesn’t appeal to me – the look, the feel, the culture, and I didn’t enjoy using it; life’s too short to do things that don’t bring some semblance of happiness. There are other tools that are more valuable to me; I know enough about MS to know that it’s not a forum for me.

    If MS were the *only* forum out there, I’d see more value there. But there are options, and that’s the beauty of the web.

    I’m likely short-sighted or small-minded, but I make a distinction between social media at today’s point in evolution and bulletin boards, chat rooms, etc. that existed previously (and no doubt still exist in some parts of the internets).

    Maybe it’s a matter of semantics …

  15. Shailes Ghimire

    February 29, 2008 at 11:29 pm

    Like Jim Duncan said time is a huge factor. Social Media is such a personal thing, requiring a degree of personal involvement and investment. You can’t pretend to have a MS presence through some other person/assistant. Maybe you can, but that other person become the online personality then. I’ve had accounts on LinkedIn, MySpace what have you for a many years now – but do I have the time to really spend my energies on all of them? No. So, I’ve made a decision to stick with blogging and Facebook and that’s about it.

    Also, piggybacking on Jim Duncan, the whole is so new and it’s not like the old media stuff where you have to have done it for many many years to really use it effectively – that’s the whole beauty of the thing. You make it what you want it to be and quite frankly some other guys “best practices” may not work for you. One of the most powerful aspects of the Internet mediums is it eliminates the constraints of the three dimensions and quite frankly it also eliminates the constraints of time. The concept of an experienced-power-user of Social media is an old world concept. In social media, you can become successful within a few short months.

  16. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 11:42 pm

    “Also, piggybacking on Jim Duncan, the whole is so new and it’s not like the old media stuff where you have to have done it for many many years to really use it effectively”

    I’m sorry Shailesh, that’s incorrect; social media is not new. Social media marketing is not a “new concept”. This is the problem with “bloggers” or “Facebookers” or whatever else the shiny new object is. There were best practices in interactive marketing pre-dating 2000. Web 2.0 started back then.

    I’m sorry to be persistent in my explanation but you jumped to Teresa’s factually incorrect criticism. BHBU is about social media marketing; blogging is but a component of SMM. While I respect your dissent, I will point out factually incorrect statements. SMM may be “new ” to you but I assure you both that many of us have marketed in this space for years (with a high degree of success). That, gents, is what BHBU is teaching.

  17. Brian Brady

    February 29, 2008 at 11:52 pm

    Let me further state that you don’t have to like BHBU. That’s really okay. You should, however, know what the conference is all about before you pass judgment upon its merit. I think Benn endorsed BHBU because he understands the efficacy of social media marketing. He has that luxury because he has taken the time to discuss it with me. When he did, we found that we’ve both walked down similar paths in our quest to make SMM work for us (with similarly strong results).

    I welcome any of you to call me should you wish to understand the evolution of Web 2.0 and how integrating it with traditional contact relationship management can improve your business. My telephone number is (858)-777-9751

  18. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 12:31 am

    > Teresa, you’re a helluva blogger but you could do so much more.

    Actually, I think being a blogger of her caliber is more than enough. I’d pay to listen to Teresa explain how she does what she does. Can’t say the same of Glenn Kelman. And still waiting to hear how he was unacceptable as a keynote speaker for Inman but perfect as a keynote speaker for BHBU.

  19. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 12:57 am

    “Actually, I think being a blogger of her caliber is more than enough”

    Jon, that’s somewhat narrow-minded, don’t you think? That’s like saying that being a helluva door knocker is enough, too. Marketing is about a mix of media. Certainly, that mix might be weighted to certain strengths but neglect of other media, in the mix, is a sure-fire way to guarantee failure when technology or consumer opinion changes.

    “And still waiting to hear how he was unacceptable as a keynote speaker for Inman but perfect as a keynote speaker for BHBU”

    I wouldn’t know about that, Jon. I didn’t plan Inman. Inman is a technology conference, Jon; BHBU is a social media marketing conference. We think Glenn has excelled in social media.

  20. Jeff Brown

    March 1, 2008 at 3:05 am

    I really wanna make a pithy comment here, but Grandma’s face keeps popping up in my head.

    It’s the whole, ‘If you can’t say anything nice, than don’t say it at all’ thing.

    The truth is, I wrote a gigantic comment, factually on the mark, but sure to cause problems. Since deleting it I’ve had the rare experience of having my cake and eating it too, without ingesting even a calorie.

    There, I feel much better. 🙂

  21. Teresa Boardman

    March 1, 2008 at 7:04 am

    Brain I beg to differ. I use many forms of social media and have learned to market my properties through them as well. Most of my efforts are outside of the real estate industry type social networks. I think there is more than one way to do this. While there is value in networking with my peers across the country there is also value in networking with people from my own town. There is more than one way to use social media and social networks. I go out and experiment with them and contribute content to the social networks that help me meet the people I want to meet.

    To date my most effective social networking has been through photography web sites. I participate in photo contest and local photo walks. I am finding many opportunities and have begone to view photos as a kind of social object that is a great way to meet people.

    I apologize if you feel as though I dismissed your efforts. You have done a fantastic job networking I see you all over the internet. You don’t see me as much in the same places becasue I am networking in a different way with a different group of people.

  22. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 9:57 am

    > That’s like saying that being a helluva door knocker is enough, too.

    Maybe it is for some. I’ve got no issue with hucksterism except that it always fails to realize that there are different approaches for different people. All are valid; not all cause people to pay for seats. Your argument is no different than any of those folks pushing their listing presentations under the guise that this is the ONLY way to get listings. There’s a difference between saying that you can add value and proclaiming that you (collective) are the sole keepers of the secret to success.

    Success to me is a few hundred sides a year, not a dozen. (Which means last year was not a successful year for me, either.)

    Jeff – I would tend to agree with you but different ground rules were established earlier by the hosts of BHBU. Now that they’re simply selling product, they’ve become a vendor. And vendors, as we have been told, are fair game.

  23. Jeff Brown

    March 1, 2008 at 10:01 am

    Jonathan — >And vendors, as we have been told, are fair game.

    🙂

  24. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 10:17 am

    Good for you, Teresa! Why am I not surprised?

    When you asked me about the conference, in November, I elected to expand upon the answer for when we saw each other in New York. My experience in San Francisco reminded me that you are delightfully easy to engage, in person. Naturally, your dismissive nature, in NY, befuddled me; I thought you had genuine interest. I think it might be well for you to revisit the questions you originally asked in November so you might have a more accurate opinion of what UNCHAINED really is.

    “Success to me is a few hundred sides a year, not a dozen.”

    Agreed, Jon. Two of the speakers at UNCHAINED are having those kind of results. Would their information be helpful to you?

  25. Jeff Brown

    March 1, 2008 at 10:20 am

    Jonathan — One of the principles to which I adhere is the Skinning the Cat principle of life.
    Nobody cares how the cat got skinned until the find out if in fact it was skinned.

    If you have a great year, you skinned the cat. Now let’s talk about your methods.

    There’s a guy in San Diego who sits in his boxers 3-5 hours daily cold calling the same way he did a decade ago. Every year he’s an incredible producer. He does is differently than you, Benn, Teresa, or me for that matter.

    Unchained is offering agents, as you put it, a different approach. I agree every approach isn’t universally attractive to all agents.

    It’s all about skinning the cat.

  26. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 10:35 am

    > Would their information be helpful to you?

    Absolutely, Brian! Fortunately I have one of your speakers in my cell phone and I’ve conversed with another via e-mail on more than one occasion. The latter also has put together multiple free seminars and podcasts, and I’ve availed myself to the latter.

    I also have passes to the Heard Museum that my wife purchased at a silent auction for my synagogue so it looks like I’m covered on all fronts. 🙂

    This comes from having spent my career finding for myself the information vendors want to sell me. Scary to think how much I might have paid for repackaged information otherwise. (Which applies more to the folks who keep telling me to claim a blog for my city. Um, got one, thanks.)

    Jeff – couldn’t agree with you more. Results are what matter.

  27. Maureen Francis

    March 1, 2008 at 10:36 am

    Brian, since you differentiate between bloggers and social media marketers, I am curious about Greg Swann’s participation in social media. I inquire since he is your co-organizer. What social media platforms does Greg actively participate in? I’ve noticed that he is moderately into linkedin (51 contacts), not too into Twitter, he has 0 contacts on mybloglog (though he has joined 91 communities), no page on facebook, no account on flickr, and I stopped looking there. He is looking like a blogger, though I am undoubtedly missing something.

  28. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 10:37 am

    “It’s all about skinning the cat.”

    Amen, Jeff. Bloggers sometimes forget that we need to make our “skinning the cat” activities profitable (or SDG&E gets awfully testy at the first of the month).

    We want to talk about how to be profitable, first, at UNCHAINED. The “art of blogging” will be discussed but we never want to lose sight of the fact that our activities MUST be about “skinning the cat”

  29. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 11:03 am

    “He is looking like a blogger, though I am undoubtedly missing something.”

    Greg’s a GIANT in blogging, Maureen and integrates it with offline marketing efforts. Like Teresa, he’s engaged in different spaces. I don’t want to give away EVERYTHING we’re doing.

    I realize that two guys, taking a risk to put on a conference about SMM (and finally pulling it all together) might seem arrogant to many of you. We’re putting ourselves out there (and become fair game for criticism). I’ve “put myself out there” to organize in-person events, since I’ve met many of you, in person. Of course, donuts at the Phoenix library are quite different than a full-blown media conference.

    I’m trying hard to be inclusive of the “blogging community” because many of you have said I need to do it. It’s getting difficult, though. People say one thing on the e-mail or on the telephone and do the opposite in comments’ threads. This duplicity is confounding

    Again, I welcome genuine collaboration and input. I’ll re-invite you to call me with your comments. Benn did and the conversations have been extremely helpful to both of us.

    Maureen, thanks for the question. You’re new to the whole discussion (the BHBU) so I welcome your collaboration (if that’s truly what you seek). You can leave your mark on what will become an important event (like Benn is doing) ; I hope you do

  30. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 11:06 am

    I’m off to a retreat today. I’ll be conspicuously absent from this conversation for 6-8 hours but look forward to your constructive advice when I return.

    Thanks, Benn, for the opportunity to gain valuable insight from your community.

  31. Maureen Francis

    March 1, 2008 at 11:29 am

    Brian,

    No doubt that Greg is huge in real estate blogging.

    Personally, I have no problem with your event. I think it is an interesting idea and you know I have publicly recognized your talent in marketing before.

    I still am curious about how Greg’s social media marketing has impacted his success as Realtor (not as a blogger/real estate industry commentator). I would be happy to ask you that on the phone. It is not a criticism of your event or of Greg, though I will admit that I felt like you were calling Teresa “just a blogger” which ruffled my feathers a bit. Clearly there is some history to that conversation between the two of you. Teresa is “huge” in blogging too, but she uses her blog to build her real estate business and I think Greg uses his for entirely different purposes.

    If you had not drawn the line between bloggers and social media marketers, my question about Greg’s use of smm never would have come up.

    In the end, I think Realtors need to hear from other Realtors who are successfully using these tools to build their business selling houses. I haven’t looked into your scheduled speakers, but if that is the agenda then it sounds useful.

  32. Teresa Boardman

    March 1, 2008 at 11:34 am

    Brian – again we miscommunicate. Like I said in my comment I am reserving judgment until I have more information. I would love to have an answer to the question I asked in November. We all have different communication style. When you think I am dismissing something you say, please ask on the spot. I see this two months after our conversation and am confused. Again I apologize if I led you to believe that I dismissed your conference. I enjoyed talking to you in person very much and hope I get the opportunity to do so again. I never really understood why my question did not get answered. i never took it personally or believed you dismissed me. I merely thought that you were very busy and that if I wanted more information I should ask again.

  33. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 11:35 am

    “In the end, I think Realtors need to hear from other Realtors who are successfully using these tools to build their business selling houses.”

    Amen, Mo. I look forward to a real conversation. I’ll look to talk with you tomorrow, as I’m late for me event. Thanks for your input; you always have great insight.

  34. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 11:36 am

    “I enjoyed talking to you in person very much and hope I get the opportunity to do so again”

    We’ll do that. I’ll try the telephone this weekend; we always do well on the telephone

  35. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 2:11 pm

    Here’s the thing, Brian … I admire you putting this together. But I think you’re talking into yourself into some fairly tight corners, both here and elsewhere.

    You now promote this as a social media marketing event yet the keynote speakers don’t really use that platform. It’s like beginning an essay on Elizabethan poetry with the sentence, “the Chicago Cubs haven’t won a World Series in 100 years.” Factual but not germane to the topic at hand.

    > Greg’s a GIANT in blogging, Maureen and integrates it with offline marketing efforts.

    No doubt he can drive traffic with the best of them, to the point people beg for link love. But there’s no mystery to what’s done. It’s all in his archives. It even was in Active Rain when he posted his entire marketing plan from his website as a comment to one of my posts.

    Again, you’ve moved into the realm of being a vendor which by BHB’s own rules makes you fair game. I don’t see a reason why this conference shouldn’t be viewed with any less of a critical eye than the e-mails we all receive daily touting THE product that will make us all rich in real estate.

    At some point, you’ve got to prove the value of the event. And I can’t imagine I’m the only one out there who’s not yet seeing it.

  36. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 2:53 pm

    “Again, you’ve moved into the realm of being a vendor which by BHB’s own rules makes you fair game. I don’t see a reason why this conference shouldn’t be viewed with any less of a critical eye than the e-mails we all receive daily touting THE product that will make us all rich in real estate.”

    Fair enough, Jon.

    “At some point, you’ve got to prove the value of the event. And I can’t imagine I’m the only one out there who’s not yet seeing it”

    Agreed. However, hundreds do. Jon, I’m not going to please all people; I can only focus on the ones who DO see the value. I’m coming here at Benn’s invitation to talk to the collaborative genius, on Agent Genius, to throw up a “big tent” and solicit advice. My goal for UNCHAINED is to be THE event for practitioners. Understand that I’m a guest here, asking for constructive advice.

    Permit me to change the direction. What would you like to see at UNCHAINED, Jon, Teresa, Jim, Shailesh, and Teresa? What would make a conference like this of value to you?

  37. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 2:54 pm

    Point of disclosure; my schedule engagement finished earlier than anticipated.

  38. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 4:04 pm

    > What would make a conference like this of value to you?

    That’s an excellent question, Brian. Honest answer – teach me something I don’t know and can’t find elsewhere and maybe then there will be value. But that’s a very, very steep hurdle.

    This isn’t to say that I have all the answers. I absolutely don’t. But I do know where I can find them. I’ve developed a network of peers and mentors (even if they don’t realize they are) who can provide me the information I’m looking for. Over the years I’ve integrated a number of different ideas into what I do. It’s not that I don’t know about MySpace. It’s that I looked at it and the ROI from wanna-be porn stars wanting to be my friend looks awfully low.

    I’m the type who felt I learned more at happy hour with my broker and fellow agents than I did in any training class. I feel like I can gain as much picking someone’s brain over a beer than I can sitting in a room being told to pound out keywords and H1 tags, or to link-bait or come up with contests to get traffic back to the blog.

    In the interest of no longer rambling, I don’t need for there to be “THE” event. I just need my feed reader, my e-mail and my RSS reader and I’m learning the same secrets to success.

  39. Chris Lengquist

    March 1, 2008 at 5:40 pm

    “I’m the type who felt I learned more at happy hour with my broker and fellow agents than I did in any training class. I feel like I can gain as much picking someone’s brain over a beer than I can sitting in a room being told to pound out keywords and H1 tags, or to link-bait or come up with contests to get traffic back to the blog.”

    Jonathan – for me you hit the nail on the head. I live in the blogging wasteland of Kansas City. It’s me and a very few others. I’ve picked up the phone and called folks. But going to Phoenix to meet with some of these people will be worth the money to me.

    I’m quite certain I’ll learn more outside the “events” than in. It’s always been that way for me. I’m also very, very selective where I spend my money. But I did choose this because of the names that will be there. Heck, I don’t even know what the class schedule looks like yet. But if I can learn something, anything from Lauie or Russell, etc. that will be worth my ticket.

  40. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 6:00 pm

    And maybe that’s the difference, Chris … I’m already here with Jay, Dru Bloomfield, John Wake, Steve Belt, Heather Barr, Chris Butterworth and others who are using their blogs to generate real estate business. Many of us have shared ideas over e-mail, over a beer or through our blogs. It’s an entirely different situation.

    I’ve been floating the idea of some sort of happy hour meet-up before the conference begins for those interested. Nothing particularly formal and no major sponsors – but the beer at Rock Bottom’s pretty inexpensive. 🙂

  41. Brian Brady

    March 1, 2008 at 8:15 pm

    Good input, Jon. I don’t think there’s anything we can teach you.

  42. Kelley Koehler

    March 1, 2008 at 9:50 pm

    Sigh. Isn’t this over yet? What a lovely hostile undercurrent here.

    I’ve held my tongue this long, seems I should be able to do so longer, eh? And yet.

    I’m going to BHBU. I figure I can finally meet my blog buddy, it’s a relatively short car ride, and if I don’t like it, I’m told there’s this fabulous place called Nordstroms where I might want to spend some time. There’s even a good chance I could learn a thing or three. From the conference and the participants and attendees, that is. Also, maybe, from Nordstroms.

    Here’s the thing: I don’t give a rat’s ass about who was what and where and when or first, or who said what contradictory thing on this date, or who didn’t follow up or produced XYZ, or who was or was not rude in what city. The bickering being bantered about? Boring. (Best word to continue the alliteration there – you caught that, right?) Makes me nearly want my $149 back. At this point, every person teaching has to prove themselves to me, if not for the first time, than all over again. That’s my right and my privilege, for paying my $149 and attending. Pay attention, you’re being judged.

    All the petty squabbling, the personal slights, the stabbing and ganging up, ack. Go enjoy the frenzy that refuses to die. As far as I’m concerned, as soon as I pay money? It’s about me. What I want. What I can get, what I can suck out of anyone’s head is my fair game. All this other little crap, pre-show, sideline entertainment? Massive waste of time. Will be leaving the “subscribe to comments” box empty on this one. It’s not about BHBU. It’s not about Greg, or Glen, or Brian, or other Genii, or other bloggers, or anyone else. It’s about me. Got that? Me. I’m a paying participant. Me. Focus on me. Don’t insult me. Remember me? I bought a ticket. Me. My money bought me the right to demand your attention on me, the right to only care about what I can get out of you. Anyone wearing a vendor hat and doing anything other than helping me becomes merely an irritant with no value. Your focus is on me. Your goal is within me. Anything – no, everything – not in line with that focus is useless.

  43. Jonathan Dalton

    March 1, 2008 at 11:00 pm

    🙂

  44. Shailesh Ghimire

    March 2, 2008 at 12:16 am

    “…there were best practices in interactive marketing pre-dating 2000. Web 2.0 started back then.”

    Brian – sure, nothing to disagree with here, but in comparision to other methods of successful selling – this method is relatively new. THe history of this is what 15 years max? What are the ROI numbers to support its success/failure. Is there is a superstar mortgage broker/real estate agent out there righ now closing 20 transactions a month purly based on SMM? I’m not trying to be sarcastic, I’m genuinely curious.

    “What would you like to see at UNCHAINED, Jon, Teresa, Jim, Shailesh, and Teresa?”

    I think your event is marvelous and brings *considerable* value to the table. I would recommend it in a heartbeat. I personally want to see how many cat’s been skinned. I’d like to see some hard core numbers. Any best practise case study will have some form of ROI. I’d like to see if anyone has documented the time and money spent against the actual sales/transactions (volume).

    I may not be able to understand SMM as well as you or anyone else, but I sure as heck will understand money!!! 🙂

  45. Brian Brady

    March 2, 2008 at 4:33 am

    Shailesh:

    I know two originators closing 7-10 units monthly from SMM. The other 5 or so they close are from referrals and MAY be attributable to SMM.

    Go to Active Rain; there are more closing 3-5 units per month.

    We’ll have a special originator workshop on Sunday.

  46. Brian Brady

    March 2, 2008 at 4:36 am

    “It’s about me. Got that? Me. I’m a paying participant. Me. Focus on me. Don’t insult me. Remember me? I bought a ticket. Me. My money bought me the right to demand your attention on me, the right to only care about what can get out of you. Anyone wearing a vendor hat and doing anything other than helping me becomes merely an irritant with no value. Your focus is on me. Your goal is within me. Anything – no, everything – not in line with that focus is useless.”

    When has it ever been about anyone else? We started this conference for practitioners by practitioners. Thanks for having an open mind, Kelley. Now, tell me what you want to see; I’ll deliver the goods.

  47. Jonathan Dalton

    March 2, 2008 at 12:42 pm

    > Good input, Jon. I don’t think there’s anything we can teach you.

    Sarcasm duly noted but respected nevertheless.

  48. Kristal Kraft

    March 2, 2008 at 4:59 pm

    LOL Kelley Koehler rocks!

    It is about the customer and if the hype doesn’t meet the expectation, you are toast! That’s a tall order to fill, because to date, seldom does a class live up to the expectation the ads created in my head.

    The best part comes from the impromptu conversations over coffee (yeah sure) and in the hallways. We learn in many ways, not just sitting in a lecture hall.

  49. Mariana

    March 2, 2008 at 10:01 pm

    [ Kelley Koehler is my idol. ]

  50. Joseph Ferrara.sellsius

    March 3, 2008 at 7:57 am

    Questions to Ask a Vendor:

    I think Maureen Francis (comment #32) & Shailesh (#45) make the critical point. Show us your SMM/blogging efforts and your track record (ROI). What’s the ROI for agents? Base it on time using conference techniques v. results VS Other methods (eg Russell Shaw print ads)/results. Does BHB have these figures? Perhaps Russell Shaw print and other “old school” techniques have a better ROI.

    1. If you teach LinkedIn, MS or FB strategies — show us the results in deals, clients. Give it to us in time invested vs. my expected returns, based on YOUR experience

    2. If you teach blogging as marketing– how many clients last year vs. hours blogging. {if you do not blog for business, how can you teach us if you’ve spent your time blogging for something else?)

    3. If you are suggesting new techniques, eg. Zestifarming— how many deals did you get from doing it?

    4. You never mentioned using Trulia Voices– are you teaching that method?

    These are fair questions to ask a vendor. It’s not too much to ask Greg, an experienced real estate agent, to provide this information—transparency and all. Why is he not here answering?

    Theory and practical results are 2 very different ways to skin a conferencer, I mean, cat 🙂

    Brian Brady is NOT a real estate agent. For folks attending to get real estate agent business, how about an agent, like Greg ,revealing the ROI he has gotten from all his efforts. If he is a GIANT blogger and he’s got zero business, he is a midget in business terms. Agents want to listen to GIANTS making money from using the techniques being TAUGHT. Theory and practical results.

    In fairness to the conference, I cannot criticize it beforehand (as Greg did to the Inman Connect, which he never attended) but I think these are fair questions.

  51. Rich Jacobson

    May 19, 2008 at 12:04 am

    Not to sound like a brown-noser, but knowing that Brian is heavily involved in this venture is enough to sell me on its merits. I can think of few other Mortgage professionals more adequately knowledgeable, experienced, and gifted in social media who can transfer this information to others in meaningful and practical ways.

    Brian, have a totally awesome week!

  52. Barry Cunningham

    May 19, 2008 at 5:40 am

    Looks like it’s off to a good start

  53. Robin

    May 19, 2008 at 5:41 am

    I have been watching the videos. Only have seen spurts but it looks as though it has been informative.

  54. Brian Brady

    May 23, 2008 at 4:48 pm

    “Brian, have a totally awesome week!”

    Thanks, Rich. Welcome to AG; a great forum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Conference Coverage

Techie’s guide to NAR’s mid-year meetings

Published

on

Are you coming to NAR’s Mid Year Meetings in Washington DC on May 11-13? If so, here’s a quick and dirty guide to what to check out and where to grab a cocktail. If you are going to be at the meetings please be sure and let me know, in the comments or DM me @nartech. I’d love to meet the Agent Genius crowd IRL.

Follow Along at MidYear Live

Even if you aren’t going to be in DC you can still follow the action at Mid Year Live.

Midyear Live brings all the news and conversation about the Midyear Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo direct to you. Visit Midyear Live between May 11-14 to check out Twitter and Facebook coverage, follow featured NAR members as they attend the event, and view news reports and recorded sessions.

From the Center for Real Estate Technology—Throughout the meetings…

Starting Tuesday, May 11, CRT is sponsoring the Wi-Fi area in the Marriott Wardman Park in the Maryland Foyer.  It will be available 24 hrs a day thru Saturday 2pm.
The Bloggers’ Lounge opens at the Omni in the Forum Room, Tues – Thurs 10am – 6pm and Friday from 10am – 4pm.

Wednesday May 12:  Business Issues Committee 10:00 AM-Noon, Marriott Wardman, Salon 3

This is where technology policy issues are discussed. If you have an interest in issues like data security and privacy, net neutrality and other tech policy issues, come and observe the Business Issues Committee and say hello. I am one of the staff executives for this committee.

Wednesday May 12: Tweetup 5:00-7:00 PM Marriot Wardman Park Lobby

To RSVP and more info.

Wednesday May 12 Raise the Roof Event 5:00PM-8:00PM Tabaq Bistro, 1336 U Street

Cocktails and Hors D’Oeuvres on trendy U Street. RSVP to erin@listhub.com with your full name and company by May 3.

Thursday May 13: Business Technology Peer Breakout Sessions 8:00AM-11:00 AM, Omni Shoram Ambassador Room

Garron Selliken, Todd Carpenter, Heather Elias, Keith Garner, Tina Merritt, Jeff Allen, Kelley Koehler, Dale Chumbley, Nobu Hata, Greg Carpenter, among others will be on hand to discuss tech topics that all real estate professionals should know about.  Twitter, Facebook, Yelp, Market Stats, Converting web leads to clients, mobile apps, and other business tools will be discussed during these informal conversations.

Thursday May 13: Business Technology Forum 3:00PM-5:00PM, Omni Shoram Empire Room

Hear what industry thought leaders have to share about today’s and upcoming tech trends.
Jeff Allen, Heather Elias, Garron Selliken, and Aaron Wheeler share their experience & insights on how technology is impacting their day-to-day business.  Audience questions are welcome.

Friday May 14: LinkedIn Breakfast 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM, Omni Shoram, Bloggers Lounge

Join Todd Carpenter and other NAR LinkedIn members for coffee and danish. For more info

If you know of something I missed, please let me know in the comments. Hope to see you in DC!

Continue Reading

Conference Coverage

National Association of REALTORS Convention 2014

Published

on

It’s Novermber 2014…

nar chicago…and we are all excited about the NAR convention this year.

I can’t wait to go through Finance World where we find the latest on nano-mortgage technology from Bank of United States (the company after the B of A/Citibank/ J P Morgan Chase merger) where an iris scan and fingerprints get done and the each borrower with less than 20% down get to do the new PMI, Person Mortgage Insurance, where they assign one of their friends or relatives as collateral until the loan gets paid down to 78%.

Ah, then the new key sharing device from GeBallMart (the merger result of GE, Major League Baseball and Wal-Mart) which makes your take the SATs again (paying the 475 Euro fee) in order to do a digital iPhone7.9 puzzle in order to be escorted into a property from a member of Blackwater Realty Security Services (a subsidiary of the CIA- a deal made in order to get people health care).

Ah, and the special speakers.  There’s inspiration on how to turn your life around when there are only 11 trashy women in your life that you sleep with.  Amazing how you can go from one sport to another and then to another and go from the lowest lows to the highest highers.  Yes, I am talking about Professional Bowling’s superstar, Tiger “Balls” Woods.

I can’t wait to hear was he has to say about life’s ups and downs now that my fellow agents and I have had the commissions we make revealed to the buyer before they even see a house and how the government maximized the maximum amounts to $500 for door opening/agreement and $1000 for door opening/agreement and settlement attendance.

Just like the mortgage brokers that got messed with in 09/10, we should have seen it coming but instead we lived high on the hog and laughed at the public and especially Congress.

But I can be thankful for the fact that I don’t have to fly on UseLess Airline and stay at the MarryRot in the beige rooms with the bed bugs that are the size of New York rats, I can stay home and see all that’s happening on my SuperMac 7 Apple computer with smellovision, video and scan-pay ability.

The best and the worst part is no real hangovers!

Continue Reading

Conference Coverage

Inman’s Got Enough Money. Let’s Give Some To MFFO

Published

on

It doesn’t get any better than this – you can actually get Inman Connect Tickets and help a charity at the same time!  I was the lucky winner of Inman Real Estate Connect Registration Passes and with the creative help of some friends (thanks @tcar and @andykaufman) decided to auction them for charity.

Inman Connect San Francisco
I’m sure @jbern had no clue what was going to happen when he started the competition: What’s Your Tweet Worth? ….between Jay Thomson’s raffle and this auction, there are some creative minds at work to help our colleagues as well as great charities.

So here’s what I would love for you to do –

1.  go place a bid

2   spread the word  **tweet it! facebook it! email it! **

3. check on the bid

4.  spread the word again **tweet it! facebook it! email it! **

The highest bidder will win full registration to Inman Connect San Francisco (both Inman Connect and Blogger’s Connect passes) and proceeds will go to Mothers Fighting For Others (that’s a $939 value).  What are you waiting for??? Go Bid!  We will be announcing the winner before the weekend.

**thanks for the tix Inman!!  Let’s see how much money we can raise**

Continue Reading

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!