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Social media for real estate: the secret sauce

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The secret sauce

I promised you some tips from my “magical marketing plan” in last week’s post about my inbound lead generation success.

I am a woman of my word and so here is the first ingredient in the Social Media Secret Sauce….YOU.

I was being tongue-in-cheek when I called it magical (you knew that, right?) because there isn’t anything magic about it except what you bring to the front with your personality.

You are the magic.

Now the question is, “how do I bring my personal type of magic to the front to help me with social media marketing?” The answer to that is, find your voice.

What is your niche? Who are you hoping to attract as clients and customers? What are you passionate about in your career? What do you bring to your clients that no one else can replicate? Where is your source of energy?

The answers to these questions may overlap or they may all be different, but they will help you to focus your attention to your “magic”.

This voice is the one you will use as your guidepost in social media. It will help you decide what blog posts are most important, who you are following on Twitter and what message you are trying to keep front of mind with your social media sphere.

The next step is the biggest

After you know what your voice is, the next step is the biggest: be tenacious. It takes time to build an effective social media marketing plan and even more time to implement the plan and even MORE time to see even a small result. This isn’t an overnight event, this is an investment in your future business that will take very little money, but lots of attention and time.

I started my journey a couple of years ago. It took about six months before I started to see some traction and it was a year before real viable leads came my way. I did this without much guidance because I was an early adopter. Maybe you can do it faster with the advice of those that come before you.

Two years into my plan, I have concrete results each week. Just yesterday a buyer called me after reading some of my blog posts and asked me to be her buyer’s agent. The results of a social media plan can be far reaching and very lucrative when you follow your voice.

Last week I had a double sided closing. The listing was a short sale and the seller found me after using Google to research short sales in Western Massachusetts and reading my blog posts. She had been turned away by two other agents in the area and was using Google to find help. I listed the home and a first time home buyer found me through my internet marketing. His offer was accepted by Bank of America (after a Twitter intervention). In the process of showing this home three buyers decided this property wasn’t the one for them, but asked me to represent them as their buyer’s agent. Last month the seller’s boyfriend has listed his house with me. All of those leads off of my blog posts.

All it cost me was some time and a lot of effort.

A social media plan isn’t something that you can set and forget. It is a change in prospecting mentality from outbound to inbound marketing and it takes dedication and determination to the effort. You won’t need to spend much money, but you will invest greatly if you want to see success.

Bippety Boppety now get to workety!

CC Licensed image courtesy of faeriequeen via Flickr.com.

Lesley offers 21 years experience in real estate, public speaking and training. Lesley has a degree in communications and was the recipient of an international award for coordinating media in real estate. In the course of her career Lesley has presented at international real estate conferences and state REALTOR associations, hosted a real estate television program, written articles for trade magazines and created marketing and PR plans for many individuals, companies and non-profits.

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23 Comments

23 Comments

  1. Fred Romano

    June 4, 2010 at 8:44 am

    Lesley – you should really test your website westfieldhomehelp.com in other browsers – it’s not looking so good using firefox. Also you may want to invest in a more interesting theme for your other site, it’s a bit bland 🙂

    • Lesley Lambert

      June 4, 2010 at 11:11 am

      Thanks for the input. I like clean and simple and feel for a topic like distressed homes basic layout with helpful information is what the consumers are looking for. Besides, I didn’t discuss blog themes or layouts, nor do I plan to. Taste is a unique thing, but I am of the opinion, as stated above that the most important part of a social media plan is the person implementing it.

      • Barry Cunningham

        June 7, 2010 at 12:53 am

        Lesley,

        Am I missing something or am I seeing things correctly? On the blog that you mention you have had a total of 2 posts in 2010…you also herald a ranking on a keyword that NOBODY is searching for.

        I know in your last post you were asked for back up numbers and refused to provide any…so I won’t bother asking…but in this regard, you have written yet another blog post championing your take on SM and when one looks it seems the only real SM you have is her eon AgentGenius.

        In this post, you mention one closing…one single closing…am I alone here or does any of this make sense to anybody else?

        I mean seriously, some of this might make sense to newbies and those who don’t really know any better but c’mon…really?

        You say you started your SM journey two years ago but you still don’t rank for any major keywords and only have 4k twitter followers?

        You say you started your SM journey two years ago and your sites really have no PR to speak of?

        You say you started your SM journey two years ago and only have 40 links to your domain and those links are from AG, ActiveRain or sites that you own?

        So what have you been doing for 2 years to develop this “presence”? And what pray tell is your marketing plan? Or is that secret as well?

        I mean no disrespect, but you have to understand…there are some of us out here who can easily see the wholes in what you have been saying. Maybe we shouldn’t be reading these posts and maybe we should just keep quiet and move on. But it just does not seem right that these kind sof posts are appropriate here on AgentGenius. It kind of makes the “genius” part of the moniker lose a little luster.

        It may be fine for Active Rain…but I really don’t think this kind of a post needs to be seen here.

        However I guess I should applaud you for now taking advantage of your tenure here. If you play your cards right it can only serve to help your stature on your other sites…that is if you begin implementing the marketing plan you seem to be touting.

      • Bruce Lemieux

        June 7, 2010 at 7:46 am

        Barry – given the amount of time you invested on this rant, you could have clicked around Lesley’s site a bit more. Lesley can defend herself, but she’s been regularly posting on her primary blog for over two years. If you actually read her article, she didn’t say that she has only one sale from SM – she only cited a couple of examples.

        • Barry Cunningham

          June 7, 2010 at 8:55 am

          Bruce you obviously don’t know me nor have you read my postings. This is hardly a rant, it’s direct questioning of a post that speaks directly to the integrity of the author and the information she is providing.

          I also don’t know where you visited, as the blog she links to in the article (westfieldhomehelp.com/) has only had two posts this entire year, like I said in my comment.

  2. Diane Guercio

    June 4, 2010 at 9:33 am

    Lesley, the fact that you went from #7 to #1 in your company speaks volumes to me. If you were doing that with postcards, I’d go out and buy stamps.
    The rest is all dog bones, if you ask me.

  3. BawldGuy

    June 4, 2010 at 10:43 am

    Hey Lesley — In your opinion, what would happen to your annual production if you added serious local DinosaurMarketing to your mix? Would love to hear your thoughts.

    • Lesley Lambert

      June 4, 2010 at 11:13 am

      I hate that kind of marketing. I was never good at sticking to it because I didn’t like it and thus I moved to my inbound social media plan. Since I don’t use it effectively I moved my time to what is working for me. Each agent is going to have their own unique results based on a lot of factors….that goes for social media marketing or “dinosaur marketing”.

  4. Clint Miller

    June 4, 2010 at 11:29 am

    Lesley…

    First off….Massive kudos to you for the advancement in-house! That is awesome and quite the testament to the idea that you know what you are doing…and do it well.

    Secondly…I am a huge fan of the information you provided in this post…especially the importance that you put on being tenacious! You have to want it…bad. And, you have to be willing to do whatever is needed to get it. Rinse. Repeat.

    Keep knockin’ em out the park, darling!!

    Clint

  5. Susie Blackmon

    June 4, 2010 at 11:51 am

    Hi Lesley, I enjoyed your post very much, and agree with you … it takes time and effort, but is well worth it. We all have to do what works for us, not somebody else. Automated lead generation turns me off, and I don’t think the new generation of buyers are going to be ‘leads;’ many of them will be readers or followers of ours.

    The more I got into real estate, the more I realized that the Cowgirl in me is much more passionate about helping horse people, offering horse properties and information, and promoting the horse industries that are dear to me as the result of my years showing and raising horses, and never-ending passion for them, than being a RE Broker, per se. People naturally gravitate toward me with horse and horse property questions, referrals, etc. None of that shouting stuff needed. Love it!

  6. BawldGuy

    June 4, 2010 at 1:00 pm

    > I hate that kind of marketing.

    I figured that out, which is why I didn’t ask the question, “Hey Leslie, do you like DinosaurMarketing?” 🙂

    I’d love an answer to the question I asked, if that’s OK.

    In your opinion, what would happen to your annual production if you added serious local DinosaurMarketing to your mix?

    • Lesley Lambert

      June 4, 2010 at 1:55 pm

      I guess I don’t understand what you are trying to get at and am a bit unclear on your question.

      If you are asking me if I think my production would improve if I did a bunch of advertising and mass mailing in my area, then my answer is: it might. But it would cost me a lot of money and the leads generated would be less familiar with me than the leads that find me through social media.

      Hey, work what works for you.

  7. Lisa Oden

    June 4, 2010 at 1:21 pm

    Great article and perspective. I’m visiting the links to read more.

    You’re so right about “finding your voice”, which is sometimes the most difficult part. Probably the most important thing you pointed out is the effort and committment required. You don’t put up a post and have your phone start ringing. It takes a consistent effort (which I’m working on) to build a following and have people find your information when THEY need it.

    As far as the Dinosaur Marketing question… If you work it properly, it still works well for a lot of people. I personally do not have the patience, money or desire to go that route. And basically, I retrieve the mail from my mailbox, go straight to the trash can and pitch anything that isn’t a bill or a card from my mother. 🙂

    By the way… I still LOVE your site header with you holding the little house in your hand! It communicates well the level of care I know you give to each of your clients.

    • Lesley Lambert

      June 4, 2010 at 1:58 pm

      Persistence is key in all endeavors. Social media is no different. I agree with you about the mail, Lisa. Thanks for your input, I appreciate it!

  8. BawldGuy

    June 4, 2010 at 2:05 pm

    > I guess I don’t understand what you are trying to get at and am a bit unclear on your question.

    What part don’t you understand? What’s unclear? You probably don’t mean to, but you’re insulting my intelligence.

    > If you are asking me if I think my production would improve if I did a bunch of advertising and mass mailing in my area, then my answer is: it might.

    I can’t top that one.

  9. Lesley Lambert

    June 4, 2010 at 2:15 pm

    I am completely not trying to insult you or your intelligence, I am guessing that it is me that is missing something here.

    My way isn’t the only way, it may not even be the best. It is just me here sharing what works for me in case someone else can benefit.

  10. BawldGuy

    June 4, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    This has nothing whatsoever to do with ‘the best way’. Factoid: 100% of my business since 1/1/2004, with the lone exception of referrals, is through SM. But I don’t, or at least haven’t had the choice ’till just now, of using anything else BUT SM. The reason is because I was forced to abandon my local market. I’ve had no local market since late 2003.

    I’m now able to come back, if only on the listing side, as a result of the massive correction. You can bet your last commission check I won’t be eschewing 2.0 marketing. However, I’ll also be using much of what’s worked well since I began so long ago. I’ll make a prediction: The income I generate locally will be split roughly 2/3 from OldSchool efforts to 1/3 SM.

    Don’t wanna go out on a limb here, but I suspect the results won’t depend much on if I like doing or not. 🙂

    • Lesley Lambert

      June 4, 2010 at 2:28 pm

      That is great, I don’t think we need to be judging each others idea of marketing here.

      I wish you nothing but the best in your new endeavors and hope your business is booming however the leads find you.

  11. Lisa Oden

    June 4, 2010 at 2:33 pm

    I think what Lesley means, and certainly what I mean, is that one is more likely to practice consistent behavior in an activity they enjoy and from which desired results are believed likely.
    I don’t shy away from traditional marketing just because I don’t like to do it or that I think it’s not effective. I don’t use it because it’s not the right method for me, so I won’t do it the best it can be done. I firmly believe that if you’re not committed to practicing a method to the best of your ability, you will not see the desired result. I know plenty of people who use traditional marketing with great success. I think that’s wonderful and wish them continued success.
    As for me… it’s not part of my future marketing strategy. I do wish you great success with the blended approach you seem to be taking. I’m certain that if your faithful to your strategy, you’ll find the desired result.

  12. BawldGuy

    June 4, 2010 at 2:36 pm

    I’ll try my hardest.

  13. Bruce Lemieux

    June 4, 2010 at 4:39 pm

    I think the winner of the Old School vs. SM debate depends on your overall business strategy. If the foundation of your business is based on acquiring listings in a geographical area, then Old School is the only way to be successful. You need to *physically* reach out to sellers via direct mail, print and other *physical* media.

    If the foundation of your business is to acquire buyers, then SM is one of the most effective methods since buyers are online.

    I have both – but listings acquired via old school marketing is the foundation of the business. I don’t see this radically changing in the coming years.

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Social Media

Twitter to start charging users? Here’s what you need to know

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Social media is trending toward the subscription based model, especially as the pandemic pushes ad revenue down. What does this mean for Twitter users?

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Twitter and other social media apps open on a phone being held in a hand. Will they go to a paid option subscription model?

In an attempt to become less dependent on advertising, Twitter Inc. announced that it will be considering developing a subscription product, as well as other paid options. Here’s the scoop:

  • The ideas for paid Twitter that are being tossed around include tipping creators, the ability to pay users you follow for exclusive content, charging for use of the TweetDeck, features like “undo send”, and profile customization options and more.
  • While Twitter has thought about moving towards paid for years, the pandemic has pushed them to do it – plus activist investors want to see accelerated growth.
  • The majority of Twitter’s revenue comes from targeted ads, though Twitter’s ad market is significantly smaller than Facebook and other competitors.
  • The platform’s user base in the U.S. is its most valuable market, and that market is plateauing – essentially, Twitter can’t depend on new American users joining to make money anymore.
  • The company tried user “tips” in the past with its live video service Periscope (RIP), which has now become a popular business model for other companies – and which we will most likely see again with paid Twitter.
  • And yes, they will ALWAYS take a cut of any money being poured into the app, no matter who it’s intended for.

This announcement comes at a time where other social media platforms, such as TikTok and Clubhouse, are also moving towards paid options.

My hot take: Is it important – especially during a pandemic – to make sure that creators are receiving fair compensation for the content that we as users consume? Yes, 100%. Pay people for their work. And in the realm of social media, pictures, memes, and opinions are in fact work. Don’t get it twisted.

Does this shift also symbolize a deviation from the unpaid, egalitarian social media that we’ve all learned to use, consume, and love over the last decade? It sure does.

My irritation stems not from the fact that creators will probably see more return on their work in the future. Or on the principal of free social media for all. It stems from sheer greediness of the social media giants. Facebook, Twitter, and their counterparts are already filthy rich. Like, dumb rich. And guess what: Even though Twitter has been free so far, it’s creators and users alike that have been generating wealth for the company.

So why do they want even more now?

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Social Media

TikTok enters the e-commerce space, ready to compete with Zuckerberg?

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Setting up social media for e-commerce isn’t an uncommon practice, but for TikTok this means the next step competing with Facebook and Instagram.

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Couple taking video with mobile phone, prepared for e-commerce.

Adding e-commerce offerings to social media platforms isn’t anything new. However, TikTok, which is owned by the Chinese firm ByteDance, is rolling out some new e-commerce features that will place the social video app in direct competition with Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook and Instagram.

According to a Financial Times report, TikTok’s new features will allow the platform to create and expand its e-commerce service in the U.S. The new features will allow TikTok’s popular users to monetize their content. These users will be able to promote and sell products by sharing product links in their content. In return, TikTok will profit from the sales by earning a commission.

Among the features included is “live-streamed” shopping. In this mobile phone shopping channel, users can purchase products by tapping on products during a user’s live demo. Also, TikTok plans on releasing a feature that will allow brands to display their product catalogs.

Currently, Facebook has expanded into the e-commerce space through its Facebook Marketplace. In May 2020, it launched Facebook Shops that allows businesses to turn their Facebook and Instagram stories into online stores.

But, Facebook hasn’t had too much luck in keeping up with the video platform in other areas. In 2018, the social media giant launched Lasso, its short-form video app. But the company’s TikTok clone didn’t last too long. Last year, Facebook said bye-bye to Lasso and shut it down.

Instagram is trying to compete with TikTok by launching Instagram Reels. This feature allows users to share short videos just like TikTok, but the future of Reels isn’t set in stone yet. By the looks of it, videos on Reels are mainly reposts of video content posted on TikTok.

There is no word on when the features will roll out to influencers on TikTok, but according to the Financial Times report, the social media app’s new features have already been viewed by some people.

TikTok has a large audience that continues to grow. By providing monetization tools in its platform, TikTok believes its new tools will put it ahead of Facebook in the e-commerce game, and help maintain that audience.

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Social Media

Your favorite Clubhouse creators can now ask for your financial support

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Clubhouse just secured new funding – what it means for creators and users of the latest quarantine-based social media darling.

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Woman talking on Clubhouse on her iPhone with a big smile.

Clubhouse – the live-voice chat app that has been taking the quarantined world by storm – has recently announced that it has raised new funding in a Series B round, led by Andreessen Horowitz, the venture capital firm in Silicon Valley.

The app confirms that new funding means compensation for creators; much like the influencers on TikTok and YouTube, now Clubhouse creators will be able to utilize features such as subscriptions, tipping, and ticket sales to monetize their content.

To encourage emerging Clubhouse creators and invite new voices, funding round will also support a promising “Creator Grant Program”.

On the surface, Clubhouse is undoubtedly cool. The invite-only, celebrity-filled niche chatrooms feel utopic for any opinionated individual – or anyone that just likes to listen. At its best, Clubhouse brings to mind collaborative campfire chats, heated lecture-hall debates or informative PD sessions. I’ll be the first to admit, I’m actually obsessed.

And now with its new round, the video chatroom app will not only appear cool but also act as a helpful steppingstone to popular and emerging creators alike. “Creators are the lifeblood of Clubhouse,” said Paul & Rohan, the app’s creators, “and we want to make sure that all of the amazing people who host conversations for others are getting recognized for their contributions.”

Helping creators get paid for their labor in 2021 is a cause that we should 100% get behind, especially if we’re consuming their content.

Over the next few months, Clubhouse will be prototyping their tipping, tickets and subscriptions – think a system akin to Patreon, but built directly into the app.

A feature unique to the app – tickets – will offer individuals and organizations the chance to hold formal discussions and events while charging an admission. Elite Clubhouse rooms? I wonder if I can get a Clubhouse press pass.

Additionally, Clubhouse has announced plans for Android development (the app has only been available to Apple users so far). They are also working on moderation policies after a recent controversial chat sparked uproar. To date, the app has been relying heavily on community moderation, the power of which I’ve witnessed countless times whilst in rooms.

So: Is the golden age of Clubhouse – only possible for a short period while everyone was stuck at home and before the app gained real mainstream traction – now over? Or will this new round of funding and subsequent development give the app a new beginning?

For now, I think it’s safe to say that the culture of Clubhouse will certainly be changing – what we don’t know is if the changes will make this cream-of-the-crop app even better, or if it’ll join the ranks of Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook in being another big-time social media staple.

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