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DocuSign users’ info viewable, company says no security breach

Developing story: DocuSign is the world’s largest electronic signature platform and it appears that emails and names of signers are visible to the public. AGBeat Exclusive

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DocuSign user information found through Google search

As the world’s largest electronic signature platform, DocuSign says that they have over 6 million unique signers processing millions of transactions per year and that they are “trusted by more people, more companies, more times than any other electronic signature provider in the world.”

In just one search query in particular, we uncovered 4,450 URLs filled with DocuSign customer names, emails, document names, and GPS coordinates of where documents were signed. These details are found on websites with URL structures appearing like the one below (which is not a functional link that takes you to a signed document, just an example):

[ba-quote]https://www.docusign.net/Member/DocuSignTrust.aspx[/ba-quote]

DocuSign tells AGBeat that while the documents appear to be hosted on their secure https servers, “They are not. Anything that is found via Google search is not from DocuSign’s secure site, but rather the publicly accessible and searchable locations where customers have saved their personal copies of signed documents. In order to access documents, data, or transactions on the DocuSign Global Network, you must have the login credentials and password.”

We do not yet know the full scope of the number of transaction details that can be seen via Google, but we can see that they go as far back as at least January in our preliminary investigation. We have not made public how to discover these documents due to security risks, but suffice it to say that we can see the private emails, signatures, times, dates, locations, and document names (hypothetically speaking, we can see “Listing on 201 Main Street” or “Employment Contract – $58k/yr” as document names).

On the heels of a hacker leaking LinkedIn and eHarmony passwords, the leaking of personal information and potential details of legal documents that are meant to be private, is a major problem for several industries and feeds the hysteria behind cloud based storage and digital data sharing.

The company tells AG that “While DocuSign encourages customers to save their signed documents on the secure DocuSign Global Network, we are also required by law to offer customers the ability to download and retain their own personal copies,” adding that “it appears that a very small number of DocuSign users have saved their own personal copies of their signed documents to publicly accessible and searchable locations outside of the secure DocuSign Global Network. In the event that customers need to save signed documents in a location outside of DocuSign, we encourage that they ensure the location meets the security requirements of all signing parties.”

DocuSign asserts their “commitment to security” as outlined on their website. DocuSign is the official and exclusive provider of electronic signature for the National Association of Realtors’ nearly one million members, under the REALTOR Benefits Program, and is used by many industries, including users like American Airlines, LinkedIn, Sony, and Yamaha.

After publication, all links formerly discovered through a Google search appear to no longer be clickable, but can still be viewed through the Google cache, as seen in the before and after below.

The American Genius is news, insights, tools, and inspiration for business owners and professionals. AG condenses information on technology, business, social media, startups, economics and more, so you don’t have to.

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39 Comments

39 Comments

  1. abodograph

    June 7, 2012 at 2:07 pm

    Nice work breaking the story!

  2. jonbenya

    June 7, 2012 at 2:15 pm

    Wow, so glad I’m not on Docusign! 

  3. Market Leader

    June 7, 2012 at 3:50 pm

    Definitely something to be aware of. Thanks for sharing!

  4. MatthewCohen

    June 7, 2012 at 3:50 pm

    I can see what you guys mean – but ask yourselves if the information disclosed is truly PII as defined in any state, or simply *might* be undesirable to have disclosed.

    • franklyrealty

      June 7, 2012 at 5:29 pm

       @MatthewCohen I had to google PII. I got this:
      Personally Identifiable Information (PII), as used in information security, is information that can be used to uniquely identify, contact, or locate a single person or can be used with other sources to uniquely identify a single individual.
       
      I would think that a private email address and private name with information that they signed an “offer to purchase 555 Oak” as being VERY personal information that can “uniquely identify” a person. And as for “locate a single person” it actually has the GPS coordinates of where the person signed. Is that PII enough?
       
       

      • MatthewCohen

        June 7, 2012 at 5:41 pm

         @franklyrealty  – Again, I see what they mean – there is significance and some sensitivity, but read further into any state’s definition of PII and when it rises to the level of significance that must be disclosed it is almost always a first initial or first name and last name plus one or more of the following (1) Social security number. (2) Driver’s license number or State ID number. (3) Account number, credit or debit card number, in combination with any required security code, access code, or password that would permit access to an individual’s financial account. In some states the account number alone is sufficient, without the password.

        • franklyrealty

          June 7, 2012 at 6:03 pm

           @MatthewCohen Got it. No passwords here. Would showing the full contract be PII in your opinion? I wouldn’t be surprised if it was up there as well. I will look.

        • jonbenya

          June 7, 2012 at 6:07 pm

           @franklyrealty  @MatthewCohen Showing the full contract would certainly be PII, IMHO.  consider if the contract exposed was a cash offer with bank statement proof of funds, or copies of drivers licenses in the file.  Also, a check copy with acct and routing numbers?  That would make for a SERIOUS breach.

        • franklyrealty

          June 7, 2012 at 6:14 pm

           @jonbenya  @MatthewCohen I just found one saying “Final Offer 555 OAK.pdf” (I changed the address). I would think this is very private information. I wouldn’t want other buyers knowing that I was offering on a house. Yes it could interfere with the deal.

        • jonbenya

          June 7, 2012 at 6:21 pm

           @franklyrealty What about the unique signature block and ID number below?  Can that be used fraudulently?

        • MatthewCohen

          June 7, 2012 at 6:35 pm

           @jonbenya  @franklyrealty The whole file would DEFINITELY be a serious breach!

        • franklyrealty

          June 7, 2012 at 6:45 pm

           @jonbenya Well the signature is usually not a real client wet signature in the sense that it wasn’t done with a pen (I think). And I don’t think that ID# can be used for anything useful to a hacker. 
           

  5. Missy Caulk

    June 7, 2012 at 4:27 pm

    Dang what is going on? I hate to hear this. Wonder why they have not notified us? 

    • franklyrealty

      June 7, 2012 at 5:27 pm

       @Missy Caulk Because they don’t know. It has probably been on there for many months.

  6. DanTroup

    June 7, 2012 at 4:58 pm

    While I think this is a good find, I don’t think it has the same weight as other breaches.  If you could actually access the documents then I would say it was huge.  Just names and email isn’t something I would stop using them for.  If you found this on your own then I feel you should have brought it to DocuSign in private and allowed them to fix it.  Once it was fixed, then publish your story. 
     
    Just because the pages were on https doesn’t mean they can’t be public. https is a protocal not a URL structure.  https can be used for public or private websites where you want the data transfering between the user and web server to be secure.  How that data is published on the server has nothing to do with https.

    • franklyrealty

      June 7, 2012 at 5:21 pm

      @DanTroup
      Reagrding HTTPs, Yes, I think the point is, it is funny when companies use “httpS” in part to seem more secure. But it isn’t so secure if you just let Google index it.
       
      So you would rather AG hold onto the information for a few days, while more customers expose themselves, vs telling Docusign first to try and fix it? Fix it how? It isn’t like Docusign can immediately remove the information from Google and Google Cache.
       
      Sure they didn’t leak the full contract. Well, as far as we know. Maybe they did. But leaking unpublished private email addresses and any details of a private contract is horrible. We have to trust these companies. I just found a colleague of mine. I bet she will NOT be happy that THREE of her transaction details (not the contract itself) are on Google. Three over 6 months.
       

    • franklyrealty

      June 7, 2012 at 5:22 pm

      @DanTroup
      Regarding HTTPs, Yes. I think the point is, it is funny when companies use “httpS” in part to seem more secure. But it isn’t so secure if you just let Google index it.
       
      So you would rather AG hold onto the information for a few days, while more customers expose themselves, vs telling Docusign first to try and fix it? Fix it how? It isn’t like Docusign can immediately remove the information from Google and Google Cache.
       
      Sure they didn’t leak the full contract. Well, as far as we know. Maybe they did. But leaking unpublished private email addresses and any details of a private contract is horrible. We have to trust these companies. I just found a colleague of mine. I bet she will NOT be happy that THREE of her transaction details (not the contract itself) are on Google. Three over 6 months.
       

  7. Merge

    June 7, 2012 at 6:01 pm

    They should really be using a hash or id. It’s extra work to put the name in the url. I would be interested in hearing why they chose to do that.
     
    I’m even MORE interested in why they allow indexing of those pages. It takes seconds to throw a robots.txt file up and keep search engines from seeing/indexing the pages.

  8. joannasmitherton

    June 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm

    Hi folks:
     
    AGBeat is trying to sell a story when there is no story.  This is about people storing documents in public – OUTSIDE the DocuSign service.  DON’T DO THAT.  Many agents have been using public sharing folders to get documents back and forth to customers using tools that are not designed to protect them.  THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS.
     
    It has nothing to do with DocuSign security.  
     
    Biggest lesson – DON’T store documents outside DocuSign. If you do, make sure it is a secure location, or you will put your customer’s information at risk.  (Not only the info about who signed, BUT THE DOCUMENTS ALSO)..
     

  9. franklyrealty

    June 7, 2012 at 9:49 pm

    I told my agents to stop using Docusign until the matter was resolved. 
     
    It appears that they found a solution to a problem they still deny existed. Now, moving forward, these private URLs will be blocked from Google via a firewall. That is great for the FUTURE, but still does not fix the approximately 10,000 users that were already indexed and still in Google’s Cache.
     
    I demand that Docusign fess up (like Tylenol does when they mess up, albeit to a worse extent) and email ALL users about this glitch or at least email the 10,000 people that likely are NOT aware that their data was released to the public for Google. 
     
    How can we trust them if they just Deny Deny Deny. Remind me of a Chris Rock video: https://youtu.be/I28rarDdaCY?t=2m20s
     
    One agent that was on there 3 times said she called Docusign and their response was “they have a team of people working on it and they know it’s a huge problem.” If it wasn’t a mistake, the answer should have been “yeah, you must have made it public, your fault not ours.”
     
    It doesn’t matter how many ISO 9000s you have and 1, 2 3 parties that supposedly test your system, when you leave the front door open. I can have Brink’s Security on my house, but who cares if the door is left open.
     
    Want to know if you are in there?
     
    Here is how:
     
    Google:
    site:https://docusign.net  “YOUREMAIL@YOURDomain.com”           (with quotes)
    or
    site:https://docusign.net  company name
     
    and see what you find. And make sure you click on the CACHED version.
     
    I just did a search and found a second friend of mine on there… they will not be happy. 2 so far.
     
    I also found a few lawyers that have their info online. Asking them if they were stupid enough to have pressed some button to make it public. I really doubt it. And if they think it was stupid for Docusign to even allow that to happen (part of what they need to protect against is user error).
     
    Frank

  10. ArnCenedella

    June 8, 2012 at 12:59 am

    I like the docusign product and if there is a problem, I believe they will fix it.
    Name and email address “breach” is a problem but it is not the end of the world. And I do believe it is possible, docusign users thru their own actions made the this data available.
    It is also good reminder to us all that any data or info transferred over the Internet may not truly be safe.
    I don’t think names and emails being “hacked” is a big deal.
    I would think most folks who are on-line have emails addresses posted on the web already, right? Lots of folks are on line for either social or business reasons want their contact info posted and they want people to be able to contact them.
    Property ow nerd hip records are public records and easily accessible.

    • franklyrealty

      June 8, 2012 at 1:16 am

       @ArnCenedella Correct. Not the end of the world.
       
      You tell me. If you sent a Docusign to a client. To offer on a house. A bidding war lets say. And he comes to you and says “why is it that some/any details from our confidential contract ‘Offer on 555 Oak Street’ are posted on Google for all to see? Also it has my private email address and the GPS coordinates for my home where I signed, I am not happy.”
       
      Are you going to tell them “Dear Sir, it is not the end of the world, get over it.”? I doubt that. 
       
      And no. Due to MASSIVE spam problems, I never post my email address ANYWHERE. So I would be very pissed if Docusign posted it online for spammers to have access to them. And yes there are web crawlers just out there looking to cultivate new email addresses to spam. 
       
      Yes they did change their system. They have yet to admit to fault or notify people that some/any of their data is online.
       
      The worst part is this is just what was found. It begs one to ask what else is out there and Docusign hasn’t disclosed.

      • BenspBenfb

        August 30, 2012 at 6:38 pm

         @franklyrealty  @ArnCenedella Yes, blaming their customers seems suspicious because there were so many. And then they managed to “fix” it and get Google to remove the links, something hard to do if the data being indexed wasn’t their own.

  11. franklyrealty

    June 8, 2012 at 1:22 am

    Any Docusign competitors out there?
     
    Anybody willing to chime in? Would your system EVERY allow your customer’s data (even if it is just an email, GPS location and contract name)  to be accessible via Google, while still hosted on your URL?
     
    If not, what steps do you do to prevent this?

    • franklyrealty

      June 9, 2012 at 3:44 pm

      Really disappointed that the Docusign competitors haven’t had the guts to come forward and state whether or not they had the same issue.

      • BenspBenfb

        August 30, 2012 at 6:36 pm

         @franklyrealty Well, it’s impossible to prevent your customers for disclosing their confidential information (purposely or accidentally). If they posted docs that contained the unique links (how did Google get those links anyway…there are so many instances it seems unlikely it was random users doing this).  Of course, most sites would have a simple robots.txt that would keep Google (being honest right?) from indexing such a site. Otherwise, the link needs to be protected, but often the “protection” is just a unique link sent in an email that you expect only the owners to have and not have them submit it to Google for indexing.  I wonder if that’s what really happened, Google indexing customer’s email?  I’ve not heard of anybody else suffering this, though, so I still suspect it was DocuSign’s fault and not their customers who did something odd like post their unique links somewhere Google could index it.

  12. AgentGenius

    June 8, 2012 at 1:38 am

    please see story updates, docusign explains how it’s not a security breach

  13. DanTroup

    June 8, 2012 at 7:42 am

    @AGBeat, what made you think this was a security breach?  You had evidence of someone breaking into DocuSign and stealing information?  This is what a breach is.  There is a huge difference between your story and other breaches in the news.  Please don’t confuse the two.  If someone wants to steal your car they have to break the window and hot wire the ignition. This is a great example of a breach.  What you found, was data that was willing exposed.  This is not a breach.
     
    Anytime you find a security flaw your first step is to contact the company.  Notifying the public first is just doing more damage.  You draw attention to something where you don’t have control.  For those that are thanking AGBeat, how are you fixing the issue?  Are you calling all your clients letting them know? Are you removing their information from showing?  You’re probably notifying them, but there is absolutely nothing you can do to resolve the issue.  If there was something you could do to fix this issue then publishing the story would have been great.  They could have included instructions for fixing the issue and you would have looked like a hero.
     

  14. Merge

    June 8, 2012 at 9:15 am

    Dear Docusign & Docusign Developers,

    Life might suck right now, but things will get better.

    Hope this helps.

    https://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1663660

    I am a Sr. Developer, willing to chat/help just because I know what its like to be in a tough spot. No charge. If you ever need me just send a quick email to Joel (attt) MergeApp.com

  15. nartech

    June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm

    This is a good opportunity for me to make a pitch for the importance of privacy and data security in all contexts. (i.e. not just when using Docusign.)  NAR has produced a data security and privacy toolkit to help you think about how you handle sensitive customer data. You can find it by following this link https://www.realtor.org/letterlw.nsf/pages/1010datasecurityprivacytoolkit?OpenDocument&Login
    You must be a member of NAR and give your NRDS number to access the document.

  16. unhacker

    July 23, 2012 at 2:55 pm

    Okay first off, yes as many have noted, this is not a “breach” as the term is generally used in Infosec.  This is certainly a risk, but is probably best characterized as ‘disclosure’.
     
    Most importantly, though, this information /was/ in fact retrieved from (or via) DocuSign’s own servers – if you doubt that, simply recognize that it was a change on DocuSign’s part that has closed this exposure.  That’s because they (probably) have restricted Google from indexing that content.  And that is what they should have done From Day One, Already.
     
    This isn’t a breach: It’s evidence of a weak or lax back-end security posture, or procedures.

    • BenspBenfb

      August 30, 2012 at 6:31 pm

       @unhacker Technically this is correct, but allowing confidential pages to be accessible is bad form, and they did put a fix in to resolve it, showing that it was an error that could be fixed easily.

  17. Ronie Walter @ IT Staffing Agencies

    July 29, 2012 at 8:35 am

    DocuSign moves the process of getting important documents signed completely online. Its tagging system shows the recipient what to do, and it offers a full court-accepted audit trail of the process. It’s a great choice for electronic signing of documents.

  18. Pingback: Despite DocuSign promises, they couldn't avoid the inevitable - The American Genius

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Introduce AWS Panorama to add machine learning to any camera

(TECH NEWS) Amazon Web Services has announced a new hardware device that will add machine learning to any camera – AWS Panorama.

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Security cameras on a gray cement wall that can be outfitted with AWS Panorama to give machine learning.

At its learning conference, AWS re:Invent, Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced a new hardware device that will add machine learning to any camera. Named the AWS Panorama Appliance, AWS claims the tool will improve industrial operations and workplace safety.

The device lets you add computer vision (CV) to your existing on-premises internet protocol (IP) cameras, which is the standard type of digital video camera most companies use today. In doing so, cameras that weren’t built to accommodate CV can now be turned into smart cameras that do.

So, how does it work?

You register your AWS Panorama Appliance with AWS Cloud and install it on your network. Automatically, the device will identify camera streams and start interacting with the existing industrial cameras.

How will it help?

According to a press release, “Each AWS Panorama Appliance can run computer vision models on multiple camera streams in parallel, making possible use cases like quality control, part identification, and workplace safety.”

  • Manufacturing Quality Control
    AWS Panorama can automate monitoring and visual inspection tasks. For instance, it can detect defective items in a manufacturing line, and send you an alert in real-time. With this information, you can address and resolve the issue to improve product quality.
  • Reimagined Retail Insights
    Leveraging AWS Panorama’s control vision, you can get insights about the retail environment to improve operations and customer experiences. For example, the appliance can count customers and calculate the length of queues.
  • Workplace Safety and Social Distance Monitoring
    It can monitor site activity to ensure operating compliance is always in place, and notify you about any potentially unsafe situations. For instance, if a forklift is outside a designated area. You can take preemptive steps to remove it so it won’t come in contact with pedestrians.
  • Supply Chain Efficiency
    AWS Panorama can track barcodes, labels, or completed products. By doing this, it can help optimize work operations.

Alongside the AWS Panorama Appliance, AWS unveiled the AWS Panorama Device SDK (Software Development Kit). This software kit enables third-party manufacturers to build their own AWS Panorama-enabled devices.

According to AWS, with Panorama SDK, manufacturers “can build cameras with computer vision models that can process higher quality video with better resolution for spotting issues.” Although the SDK isn’t ready yet, AWS says it will be ready soon.

AWS Panorama Appliance is still in preview in US East (N. Virginia) and US West (Oregon) regions, so it isn’t available everywhere yet. However, you can apply for an AWS Panorama Appliance Developer Kit on their website to start building and testing your computer vision applications.

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Create a pandemic-friendly sign-in with this touchless technology

(TECH NEWS) In an era where touchless communication is paramount, Wellcome brings touchless employee and visitor sign-in technology to the workplace.

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Logo page for Wellcome, a touchless technology sign-in.

Touchless technology is becoming more and more common these days and for good reasons — health and safety. Due to the COVID pandemic, social distancing is crucial in helping decrease the amount of positive coronavirus cases.

Unfortunately, some work environments require in-person employees, contractors, and visitors. And now, some businesses are even starting to bring more of their workforce back into the office. While we can hopefully assume they all have some safety protocols in place, the front desk interactions haven’t changed much. This makes it difficult to manage and see who’s in and out.

But to fill in that gap, meet Wellcome. Wellcome is a touchless sign-in platform for employees and visitors. According to their website, the app “helps you manage the workplace effectively, making it safe and easy for everyone” who’s in the office.

And the platform does this by implementing the following features in its tool.

Employee Touchless Check-in
By uploading a list of employees to the Admin, employees automatically receive an email with a one-click “Wellcome Pass”. This pass can be added to their Apple or Android digital wallet.

Once at work, employees scan their pass on an iPad at the reception desk. Then, they will see a customizable confirmation screen with the company’s health and safety guidelines messaging. This reminder can help ensure everyone is following the rules and staying safe.

Visitor Touchless Check-in
For visitors without a Wellcome Pass, they can still scan the QR code on the iPad using their device. The QR code will direct them to a customized check-in form where they can select their host and fill out a health questionnaire on their mobile device.

COVID-Safe Visitor Screening
Based on how a visitor answers the health screening questionnaire, it will grant or deny them access to the office. This health COVID screening will help HR managers “protect the office by restricting access to visitors that might be infected.”

Host Notifications
Via email, Slack, and/or SMS, Wellcome will immediately notify the host when they have a visitor and send them the visitor’s contact details. It will also let them know if their visitor was granted or denied access based on the health screening. If a visitor is denied access, the host is instructed to not meet the visitor, but contact them another way.

Contact Tracing
If there is a potential or confirmed COVID-19 case at work, Wellcome makes it easy to identify and notify anyone who may be at risk. To do this, the HR manager just needs to search by a person’s name and date range in the Admin. Search results will pull up anyone that could have come in contact with the infected person.

The Admin will also notify all employees and visitors that need to self-isolate and get tested. If needed, Wellcome also lets you download and submit a tracing report.

Manage Office Capacity
Wellcome tracks workplace capacity and occupancy data to help maintain social distancing. If occupancy reaches the capacity limit, the Admin will be notified to “take steps to reduce occupancy in order to stay within the required limits.”

In the Admin Dashboard, reports are available to view the status of current capacity. It can also predict what the occupancy will be each day so companies can plan ahead.

Book Workdays
Employees have the option to pre-book when they want to come into the office. The app displays how many slots are available for each day, and it can send out a calendar reminder. Through the Admin, HR managers can see who will be coming into the office. This is Wellcome’s other way of making sure capacity limits are always within range.

Also, setting up Wellcome is pretty simple. All you need is an iPad. You install the app on it and leave it at the reception desk for employees and visitors to check-in.

For companies who have employees and visitors in and out of the office. Wellcome does sound appealing, and it looks like they will benefit a great deal from the platform. And, if you’d like to check it out, Wellcome lets you use the app free for 14 days. Afterwards, you can select a plan that works best for you.

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Scoring productivity: Is this new Microsoft tool creepy or helpful?

(TECH NEWS) Microsoft launched a new tool that helps monitor user data, but it’s not a work monitoring tool – it’s trying to judge productivity.

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Black and white data screens monitoring productivity.

Last month, Microsoft launched their new tool, “Productivity Score”. According to Microsoft, this new tool will help organizations understand how well they are functioning, how technology affects their productivity, and how they can get the most out of their Microsoft 365 purchase.

But to do all of this, the tool will keep track of how each employee is using Microsoft products. For instance, the tool will monitor how often video or screen sharing is enabled during meetings by employees.

It will keep a metric of how employees are communicating. It will show if employees are sending out emails through Outlook, sending out messages through Teams, or posting on Yammer. It will also keep track of which Microsoft tools are being used more and on which platforms.

So, Microsoft’s new tool is a scary work surveillance tool, right? According to Microsoft, it isn’t. In a blog post, Microsoft 365’s corporate Vice President Jared Spataro said, “Productivity Score is not a work monitoring tool. Productivity Score is about discovering new ways of working, providing your people with great collaboration, and technology experiences.”

Spataro says the tool “focuses on actionable insights” so people and teams can use Office 365 tools to be more productive, collaborative, and help make work improvements. And, while this all sounds good, privacy advocates aren’t too thrilled about this.

Microsoft says it is “committed to privacy as a fundamental element of Productivity Score.” To maintain privacy and trust, the tool does aggregate user data over a 28-day period. And, there are controls to anonymize user information, or completely remove it. However, by default individual-level monitoring is always on, and only admins can make any of these changes. Employees can’t do anything about securing their privacy.

So, user data privacy is still a large issue on the table, but privacy advocates can breathe a sigh of relief. Yesterday, they got a response from Microsoft they can smile about. In another blog post, Spataro responded to the controversy. “No one in the organization will be able to use Productivity Score to access data about how an individual user is using apps and services in Microsoft 365,” he said.

Although Productivity Score will still aggregate data over a 28-day period, it will not do so from an individual employee level. It will do it from an organizational one as a whole. Also, the company is making it clearer that the tool is a “measure of organizational adoption of technology—and not individual user behavior.”

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