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HelloSign for Gmail offers legally binding eSignatures

HelloSign just made the eSignature process even sexier with their new Gmail plugin – edit and sign documents without ever leaving Gmail. Genius!

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HelloSign for Gmail: edit and sign documents without leaving Gmail

With a simple plugin, HelloSign now offers eSignatures that are legally binding right from within Gmail, where users can edit and sign documents without leaving their Gmail account. This tackles the massive pain point with eSignatures by eliminating the need to download a document and upload it to another site or service to edit or add signatures. According to the San Francisco startup, Gmail creator Paul Buchheit said, “HelloSign for Gmail is awesome!” That’s a pretty hefty endorsement.

By keeping the eSignature process in the email workflow, HelloSign estimates that most contracts can be signed in 30 seconds or less, which compared to the old school process (download, then print, then sign, then scan, then upload, then attach, then email or upload to another service) eliminates a massive amount of time, which is the name of today’s game.

HelloSign sought to reduce unnecessary friction

“We looked at the document-signing process and saw a lot of unnecessary friction,” said HelloSign CEO Joseph Walla. “So we scrapped everything and set out to make the process of responding to a signature request as easy as possible. Since virtually every signature request comes via email, we built the signature process into the email workflow and the result is the easiest way to sign a document.”

The HelloSign Gmail plugin is available in the Chrome Web Store, and works like so:

[pl_video type=”vimeo” id=”57488523″]

Productivity booster, and legally binding

The company says the plugin offers three main benefits: staying focused on the tasks at hand, conducting business in no time flat, and all signatures are legally binding and backed up in your HelloSign account. They even offer reusable documents so you can simply zip over common documents with a request for signature. Additionally, users can create a template for easy completion and even create a unique, reusable link that can be hosted on your site or sent via email.

Not only is the plugin a productivity booster, it is simply a genius tool that streamlines the entire process, leaving many competitors looking archaic overnight.

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Marti Trewe reports on business and technology news, chasing his passion for helping entrepreneurs and small businesses to stay well informed in the fast paced 140-character world. Marti rarely sleeps and thrives on reader news tips, especially about startups and big moves in leadership.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. JoeLoomer

    January 16, 2013 at 1:01 pm

    Cool find Marti!
    Navy Chief, Navy Pride

  2. Nick Bastian

    January 16, 2013 at 3:53 pm

    Seriously? I gotta’ check this out… Thanks for sharing!

  3. Stephanie Crawford @AgentSteph

    January 17, 2013 at 10:08 am

    Right on!

  4. Mark J. Lehman

    February 8, 2013 at 1:10 pm

    Been using this for a month now and it is the easiest, coolest esign app yet. What’s great is even some of the technology “challenged” agents are able to do this with no problem (once I helped them upload their signatures). Buchheit is right – Awesome!

  5. Michael M. Nash

    October 26, 2015 at 8:26 am

    In recent years, many countries worldwide have adopted legislation and regulations that recognize the legality of a digital signature and deem it a binding signature. Digital signatures are just as binding as traditional pen and ink signatures as long as they are executed through a process that clearly establishes intent to sign and ensures all legal elements of proof.

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Tech News

News site seems run by robot Ron Burgundy with tourettes

(TECH NEWS) You can find a possible look into the future of bot generated content on TechZimo. Beware though, it is filled with errors.

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TechZimo bot writer

If you have had any nightmares about the singularity, aka robot apocalypse, let me put those fears to bed. In actuality the doomsday scenario will be much more clumsy and stupid looking than you ever thought robots could be.

As a Web Producer, I am entrenched in research – and today, I came across a site I hadn’t seen before – techzimo.com. After reading the first 2 sentences of an article about Uber, I began to think something felt a bit off about the writing.

Quotation marks were pressed right against the words before it, like”this”. Now the article didn’t include that many quotes, but what it did inhabit was a tangential synonym that didn’t quite contain.

If you felt your mind pause for a second while reading that last sentence, you’re not alone. You’ll notice some of the words almost work together, but not quite, and those kinds of mishmoshed sentences and punctuation faux pas are exactly what I was dealing with when reading the article.

Technically the quotes were around the right words, but the placement of the quotation marks in the rest of the sentence was all kinds of wrong. Also, some of the words used do technically equate to the concept the “writer” was looking to achieve, but given my experience, a real live human would use different words that are easier to understand…right?

After powering my way through the badly worded, weird misquoted article, I looked at who the author was. “Team TechZimo” wrote the piece, I immediately thought “Oh, well if there is a story no one wants to cover, maybe they throw a bot on the story and just let it go?”

Then I looked at how many articles “Team TechZimo” had written – 720 posts, but that’s not all, while writing to this point that number has reached 727. in the hour since I first looked at the site, 7 more articles were written, I thought “that has to be a bot.”

But that cant be…that’s an insane number of articles for a company to hand to a bot. So I looked at the home page to view all the articles, and I’ll bet you can guess what I found.

All were written by “Team TechZimo.”

That’s right. Every single article on this site was bot written.

My next question was “how long this had been going on?” So I investigated. The very first article was written on January 31st, 2020, and a 39 articles were written the day they opened the site!

To recap and to further drive home my point, this entire site did not exist 1 month ago but now has 729 articles up. Every one of those articles are filled with errors, but maybe not egregious enough issues to ring an average reader’s alarm bells.

So naturally the next thing I wondered was why? Why create a site that improperly writes news stories that people may want to read? My first guess is ad space, every page has ads. A single person can get a writing bot for free (I will not link one!), pay for a domain, get that bot a writin, and profit from generic ads.

I realize that by writing this and linking to the TechZimo site, I am almost contributing to the validity of this issue, but honestly I am more worried about the people who do not scrutinize their news sources.

Lucky for you (and other fact-driven readers), it seems many of the articles are mostly filled with plain facts. The only problem was with punctuation and word choice.

So while you are out inquiring the internet, be sure to”keep your eye to the grindstone,” and beware of this or any other one-authored sites that within 1 month, has 730 articles and zero comments.

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Tech News

Students say free coding school wildly fails to deliver

(TECH NEWS) There’s a serious barrier to entry into web development so a free coding school launches, but students say it isn’t delivering on their promises.

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Coding bootcamps

Technology changes quickly and so does the skillset requirement by companies. Many people are finding themselves in the stage of their career path where they may want to try something new – and not surprisingly, make a nice salary doing it. The launch of coding bootcamps (starting with Code Academy and 2011) has been touted as the solution to educate those on a missing skillset and setting them up for well-paying J-O-Bs.

Coding bootcamps, now up to 95 full-time coding academies in the United States, offer job seekers training in an area where they can move in to a new career and also meet to provide much needed talent to employers who need people who can code. This doesn’t usually come for free though. Average coding bootcamps (6 months) can cost up to $21K with the promise you will land a high paying salary at the end of it. There are also many universities providing coding boot camp classes.

What does it mean when a free coding school launches (with the intent to provide an educational opportunity to those who maybe don’t have the funding for a large investment and/or the ability to take out more student loans) and simply asks for a portion of your starting salary once you land that incredible new Developer gig?

Sounds like a great idea. This meets the market demand for interested people to learn a new skill set and be ready for a new career in software development. Shouldn’t we be asking how easy it is for these folks to get hired after the program? The challenge with the Lambda School is that their curriculum and UX for online learning is in development.

While they intended to meet people where they were with an online platform (offering flexibility to the students and teachers), it has left a little bit to desire by its participants. The learning opportunities are constantly changing. The teachers are also not always available and most likely have other full-time obligations or employment.

Many students were left disappointed that they didn’t feel the education matched expectations and didn’t see how they were going to be able to be hired in to roles that would allow them to pay back the tuition. So much so they sent requests to get out of their signed contracts and halt the program.
It goes without saying that anything new has its challenges and businesses can only move so fast.

No matter how fast technology changes, we are humans and have certain human behaviors. Employers want to see real-world experience so even if you’ve taken classes, the candidate must be willing to do things above and beyond the class (volunteer projects and networking for sure). While we root for Lambda School to be a legitimate solution for those how may not have the budget for a full-time coding school, it might be worth the time to let them sort out their curriculum challenges and consider building up your skill set in this area in other ways.

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Tech News

Defense startups are getting beaucoup bucks from the DoD

(TECH NEWS) Some tech companies are getting large venture capital because the Department of Defense is looking for new defense startups.

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While private investors remain wary of funding defense startups, they are still keeping an eye on the possible venture opportunities. Meanwhile, the Pentagon is hoping domestic investors will increase spending into these startups in order to compete with China’s strategy of creating private equity firms to invest into foreign technologies.

A major reason for the growing interest by venture capitalists is the shift in focus from traditional weapons to tools for information warfare, meaning software and tech systems. Defense startups are creating products that may have multiple benefits outside the DoD.

Changes in the defense venture landscape are slow with all three parties learning how to benefit from one another. Startups realize working with the DoD is a “mission-driven objective” as stated by Ryan Tseng, founder of Shield AI. “We went into this eyes wide open, knowing full well that to the venture community, the math doesn’t make sense.”

However, there are several big investor players already in the game. Andreessen Horowitz, a top-tier venture fund is banking on the economic sustainability of defense startups in the future. They’ve already invested in Shield AI and defense tech company Anduril Industries. Additionally, the Founders Fund, another big name venture firm led by Silicon investors Peter Thiel, Brian Singerman, and Ken Howery is investing in Anduril and goTenna after successfully backing SpaceX and Palantir Technologies.

Defense companies’ emphasis on tech could be the answer to challenges usually associated with DoD investments like competing against dominate manufacturers with steady government contracts and long procurement cycles. U.S. Code 2377 stipulates that commercially available items be considered first in procurement efforts. If defense startups can enter the market, they will also stand a chance of winning government contracts over bigger, traditional companies, thus diversifying the playing field.

But until there is a greater guarantee of a payoff, investors are likely to remain skeptical. The possibilities for this new generation of defense companies is going to needs some more wins to prove the future is in their corner.

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