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Should You Care About Your Site PageRank™?

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Link structure illustrating the passing of PageRankFirst of all, let’s clear an oft-confused difference between true PageRank (PR) and what most folks are familiar with: toolbar PageRank (tPR).

It’s impossible to know your actual PageRank. Your actual PageRank is a numerical weight assigned to the varying pages of your website. What you’re probably used to seeing (and maybe talking about) is toolbar Page Rank (tPR). That is the number you see on Google’s toolbar and until recently also in Google Webmaster Tools. tPR is expressed as any of the numbers from 0 to 10 and is “derived from a theoretical probability value on a logarithmic scale like the Richter Scale.”1

PageRank is updated constantly by Google as they make changes to their algorithms and the natural linking of the web changes. Toolbar PageRank is the whole number representation of actual PageRank, however, it is updated infrequently. As of the writing of this post, the last update of tPR was April 3, 2010. It’s now mid-August.

So, should I care?

In short, yes. Obviously PageRank is one of Google’s valuations of your web property and as such, you should care to nurture and build your PageRank with Google. Otherwise, why would you be reading SEO articles on AgentGenius?

However, as mentioned above, the only way you can guess at your PR is to know what your tPR is. And since it is updated only a few times a year at most and based on an unknown past point, my advice is, don’t dwell on your tPR number. It will fluctuate with Google’s algorithms and you have no way of knowing what your current, true PR is at any given moment.

A web page or site does not have to have tPR to rank in Google. « Understand this! Why you ask? PR is only one of the many many factors Google uses in their ranking algorithm(s).

Does Google have anything to say about tPR?

Why yes, yes they do-

We’ve been telling people for a long time that they shouldn’t focus on PageRank so much; many site owners seem to think it’s the most important metric for them to track, which is simply not true.
Susan Moskwa, Google

And that my friends, is the final word.


1 Wikipedia: PageRank

Marty Martin is an accomplished SEM/SEO anti-consultant with a broad range of experience working for a wide variety of clientele including colleges and universities, regional and state tourism, government and business. An advocate for business, Marty works hard to share accurate information in a world suddenly overrun with "social media consultants."

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Fred Romano

    August 16, 2010 at 10:26 am

    I just wish Google would update that PR in the toolbar more often, like maybe once a month! That way they wouldn’t keep everyone guessing 🙂 — I love Google though

    • Outsourcing Philippines

      August 17, 2010 at 7:28 pm

      Thumbs up to you, Fred! 🙂

  2. Property Marbella

    August 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

    Hi Marty,
    Don’t take to hard on the PR, but every website needs in-links. If you want blogs or forums comments links to your site, so gives PR you a good hint of the quality of the site. Of course is Do-follow or No-follow more important when you choose blogs and forums.

  3. Joe Ginsberg, CCIM

    August 18, 2010 at 1:54 pm

    In bound links, page rank, key words and FRESH CONTENT… all very important for the growth of your traffic.

  4. Dave Chomitz

    August 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    I’m certainly no expert, but I question why the average Realtor would be concerned at all about PR. I question the wisdom and ROI (it’ll be considerable “I”) trying to out rank the big players and established sites to get organic traffic that converts about 3% of the time.

    From here it looks like there should be better ways and places to focus for better results.

    Just sayin ……. Cheers

    Dave

    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:34 am

      Thanks for the comment Dave. I would think most agents reading AG aren’t your “average” REALTOR. 😉 At least not yet. Most, if not all, of the agents I’ve encountered on AG are pretty forward thinking.

      But to address your question, the average agent shouldn’t be concerned about their PR, nor the above average agent. If you follow the SEO advice and best practices dolled out here, your site will be just fine without ever considering your PR (or tPR). 😉

      Cheerio!

  5. Phil Boren

    August 18, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Marty: I didn’t even know about (tPR), so I guess I was unaware what I should be caring about! What’s interesting to me is that I’ll have pages at BoulderHomeResource.com that rank pretty well, then I’ll post something on my integrated blog or update content (which Google values, I thought), and the PR will drop. Thanks for the info.

    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:35 am

      Hi Phil,

      As the big G updates their algorithms, etc. PR (and tPR) ebbs and flows. Another reason not to worry about it. As long as the search engines are sending you traffic you are optimizing for, you’re probably doing fine. I have pages with no PR at all that send me traffic. 🙂

  6. James Chai

    August 18, 2010 at 10:57 pm

    The statement from the Google Rep (above) says it all. There are lots of varying metrics one should look for but there is NOT an end all say to SEO. It constantly evolves and the tools we use to measure ourselves by will continually change as well.

  7. Tauranga Real Estate

    August 20, 2010 at 3:13 am

    Every agent should have a website and be concerned about page rank, especially in these tough times. The Real Estate Institute of New Zealand said on Friday that total house sales in New Zealand declined last month, while house prices also fell.

    A total of 4,411 homes were sold in the country in July – down from the 4,575 sold in June but still higher than the record low of only 3,666 sales last January. This marks the lowest residential sales turnover for a July month in ten years.

  8. SmartVestors Realty

    August 22, 2010 at 6:05 am

    I really dont care on page rank, but what matters how you serve your customers with their actual requirements, thats all about the recurrent visitation.

    Thanks,
    SmartVestors Realty

  9. Roberto Mazzoni

    October 29, 2010 at 2:40 am

    I have been keeping a blog for a couple of years now and recently I had slowed down my updates and noted that my page rank had plummeted. Now I have resumed publishing and I didn’t see an immediate change. This article has gotten me to understand that there a time delay on the process and that consistency of updates is key, as always 🙂

  10. Max Boyko - Team Hybrid

    December 18, 2010 at 7:39 pm

    Everything you can do to convert more clients these days should be used for any agent (especially the forward thinking ones). Someone mentioned why bother when you only get a 3% conversion rate… ummmm hello? You don’t want to make an extra $100k+ per year?

    30 visitors a day = 900 visitors/month
    3% conversion = 27 leads/month
    10% closing rate = 2.7 clients/month = 32 deals/year

    Depending of course where you are located will make a difference, but I think it’s safe to say $3,000 commission per deal is pretty conservative. Definitely makes it something to explore to say the least. Good luck 🙂

  11. Ryan

    November 27, 2015 at 4:55 am

    I never really cared too much about my own page rank, its the quality of links. Actual editorial links and mentions from websites that have a good PR are best. and Quality not quantity

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Opinion Editorials

How to turn your complaint mindset into constructive actions

(EDITORIAL) Everybody knows someone who complains too much. While being open is important for mental health, constant bellyaching is not.

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complaint mindset

Everybody knows someone who complains too much. While being open is important for mental health, constant bellyaching is not, so here are a few tips on turning your complaints into constructive actions.

It’s important to understand the difference between “complaining” and “addressing.” Talking about problems which mandate discussion, bringing up issues slated to cause larger issues down the line, and letting your boss know that you have the sniffles all fall into the latter category due to necessity; complaining is volitional, self-serving, and completely unnecessary in most contexts.

Complaining also puts you in an excessively bad mood, which may prevent you from acknowledging all the reasons you have not to complain.

Another point to keep in mind is that complaining occasionally (and briefly) isn’t usually cause for ostracization. Constant or extensive complaining, however, can lead others to view you as a largely negative, self-centered person — you know, the kind of person literally no one actively seeks out — which is why you should focus more on redirecting that negative energy rather than using it to remind your barista why they gave up their dream of becoming a therapist.

Complaining stems from two main sources: the need to be validated—for example, for others to know what you’re going through—and the need to be comforted. Addressing a chronic complaint mindset, then, is largely about validating and comforting yourself. This is a simple solution which nevertheless can take years to manifest properly, but you can start by doing a couple of things differently.

“Focus on the positive” is perhaps the hokiest advice you’ll get from anyone, but it works. In virtually any situation, you can find a positive aspect—be it an eventual outcome or an auxiliary side-effect—on which you can concentrate. Think about the positive enough, and you’ll talk yourself out of complaining before you’ve even started.

It’s also good to remember that no one, no matter how much they care about you, can handle constant negativity. If you find yourself constantly hitting people with bad news or tragic personal updates, try mixing up the dialogue with some positive stuff. That’s not to say that you can’t be honest with people—friends, family, and colleagues all deserve to know what’s going on in your life—but make sure that you aren’t oversaturating your listeners with sadness.

Lastly, keep your complaining off of social media. It’s all too easy to post a long Facebook rant about being served cold pizza (no one likes cold pizza on day one), but this just results in your loding a complaint reaching a larger number of people than vocalization ever could. If you have to complain about something in earnest, avoid doing it anywhere on the Internet—your future self will thank you.

Being honest about how you feel is never a bad thing, but constant negativity will bring down you and everyone around you. If you can avoid a complaint mindset as a general rule, you’ll one day find that you have significantly less to complain about.

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Business Finance

7 ways to get your freelance invoices paid more quickly

(FINANCE) It’s easy to feel uncomfortable bringing up money with your superiors, but for a freelancer, it’s more important than ever to bring up the issue. Here are 7 tips to get your invoices paid quickly.

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financial advice

For many, an awkward topic of conversation revolves around money. Whether asking for a raise or asking to borrow money, people often feeling uncomfortable when talking money.

This is equally, or possibly even more so, true for freelancers who are solely in charge of their finances. Without a system of weekly direct deposit, freelancers have to work overtime to keep their earnings in order.

The issue with this is that clients also have a lot on their plates, and something as simple as a freelancer’s paycheck is common to fall through the cracks. This causes freelancers to have to work friendly reminders into their repertoire.

However, freelancers may not always be knowledgeable of the best ways to keep their finances in check (no pun intended). Below are seven ways to enhance payment methods.

  1. You have to be willing to make billing a priority. Due to the fact that money is awkward to talk about, as aforementioned, many let this fall by the wayside. The best way to do this is to keep up to date with your invoices and send them as soon as they are done. Making a calendar specific for billing can help with this idea.
  2. This second bit dates back to when we were young and learning our manners: it is crucial to be polite. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it also increases speed in payment. Using “please” and “thank you” in invoicing emails are said to get you paid five percent faster.
  3. It is best to try and keep a complicated concept like finance as simple as possible. Make sure you are creating specific due dates. This will help to signify importance of payment.
  4. Now that virtually anything can be done online, it would make sense to use electronic payment verses an old-school check. Accepting online payments will get a user paid, on average, eight days faster as opposed to a check.
  5. This is an important notion to keep in mind for any aspect of your business life: be professional. Invoices are often seen by many eyes so it is best to include your business’s logo on said invoice. This has been found to increase chances of being paid on time by 10 percent.
  6. Specificity is urged again in the form of transparency. Make sure you are giving detailed descriptions on each invoice so that anyone looking at it knows exactly what you are being paid for. By doing this, you are 15 percent more likely to be paid on time.
  7. While you may be invoicing month by month, try to avoid sending on the 30th or 31st. Being that everyone, generally, sends their invoices in on these dates, it takes 10 – 20 percent longer to be paid. With everyone sending it at the end of the month, it has a tendency to back up payroll.

The most important thing to remember is that while the topic of money may be awkward, it is your money. If you let a few invoices fall behind because you are uncomfortable reminding your client, this has a way of adding up. Be sure to keep on track with your finances to earn what you are working for.

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Tech News

For meetings that should be an email, there’s StandupMeet

(TECH NEWS) If you’re tired of having your precious work time taken up by useless meetings, there may be a solution.

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standupmeet

Have you ever attended a meeting that turned out to be a waste of time and set you back on your work? I’m going to go out on a limb here and assume that every person reading this article is nodding in agreement.

Meetings, if executed appropriately (and sporadically,) can be effective. However, having weekly (or even daily) meetings that are designed to catch-up or give reports can add up to a ton of wasted time.

Across the board, meetings are generally geared towards productivity, and oftentimes they are counterproductive. So, how can you still get that need for touching-base with employees while still being productive? StandupMeet might just have the answer for that.

StandupMeet is a tool designed to make meetings more productive and agile. According to their statistics, more than $37 billion per year are being spent on unproductive meetings.

The main features include: the digitization of meetings, the instantaneous sharing of minutes, and the ability to assign actions and keep track of progress.

By making the meetings digital, you organize meeting points in one place. Decisions, actions, and key points can be logged in real time and accessed before the meeting.

This makes projects more agile and helps to increase critical success factors.

With instantaneous sharing of minutes, you can collaborate and share minutes of the meeting, key result areas, and action points. This is also done in real time and is shared with colleagues to make sure that each person is on the same page.

Finally, by assigning actions and keeping track of projects helps to ensure data integrity and provides accountability to each team member. Automated reminders are available so that you can spend your time on the more valuable tasks first.

In addition, StandupMeet also offers: project wised meeting, customized meeting types, organized agendas, shareable meeting minutes, accountability, reminders to ensure time is being appropriately applied, recurring meetings, conflict-free meeting scheduling, locations, automated follow ups, automatically tracked action points, and flexibility across time zones.

This can save time and increase productivity for on-site workers and can also be beneficial for teams that are remote.

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