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Should You Care About Your Site PageRank™?

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Link structure illustrating the passing of PageRankFirst of all, let’s clear an oft-confused difference between true PageRank (PR) and what most folks are familiar with: toolbar PageRank (tPR).

It’s impossible to know your actual PageRank. Your actual PageRank is a numerical weight assigned to the varying pages of your website. What you’re probably used to seeing (and maybe talking about) is toolbar Page Rank (tPR). That is the number you see on Google’s toolbar and until recently also in Google Webmaster Tools. tPR is expressed as any of the numbers from 0 to 10 and is “derived from a theoretical probability value on a logarithmic scale like the Richter Scale.”1

PageRank is updated constantly by Google as they make changes to their algorithms and the natural linking of the web changes. Toolbar PageRank is the whole number representation of actual PageRank, however, it is updated infrequently. As of the writing of this post, the last update of tPR was April 3, 2010. It’s now mid-August.

So, should I care?

In short, yes. Obviously PageRank is one of Google’s valuations of your web property and as such, you should care to nurture and build your PageRank with Google. Otherwise, why would you be reading SEO articles on AgentGenius?

However, as mentioned above, the only way you can guess at your PR is to know what your tPR is. And since it is updated only a few times a year at most and based on an unknown past point, my advice is, don’t dwell on your tPR number. It will fluctuate with Google’s algorithms and you have no way of knowing what your current, true PR is at any given moment.

A web page or site does not have to have tPR to rank in Google. « Understand this! Why you ask? PR is only one of the many many factors Google uses in their ranking algorithm(s).

Does Google have anything to say about tPR?

Why yes, yes they do-

We’ve been telling people for a long time that they shouldn’t focus on PageRank so much; many site owners seem to think it’s the most important metric for them to track, which is simply not true.
Susan Moskwa, Google

And that my friends, is the final word.


1 Wikipedia: PageRank

Marty Martin is an accomplished SEM/SEO anti-consultant with a broad range of experience working for a wide variety of clientele including colleges and universities, regional and state tourism, government and business. An advocate for business, Marty works hard to share accurate information in a world suddenly overrun with "social media consultants."

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Fred Romano

    August 16, 2010 at 10:26 am

    I just wish Google would update that PR in the toolbar more often, like maybe once a month! That way they wouldn’t keep everyone guessing 🙂 — I love Google though

    • Outsourcing Philippines

      August 17, 2010 at 7:28 pm

      Thumbs up to you, Fred! 🙂

  2. Property Marbella

    August 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

    Hi Marty,
    Don’t take to hard on the PR, but every website needs in-links. If you want blogs or forums comments links to your site, so gives PR you a good hint of the quality of the site. Of course is Do-follow or No-follow more important when you choose blogs and forums.

  3. Joe Ginsberg, CCIM

    August 18, 2010 at 1:54 pm

    In bound links, page rank, key words and FRESH CONTENT… all very important for the growth of your traffic.

  4. Dave Chomitz

    August 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    I’m certainly no expert, but I question why the average Realtor would be concerned at all about PR. I question the wisdom and ROI (it’ll be considerable “I”) trying to out rank the big players and established sites to get organic traffic that converts about 3% of the time.

    From here it looks like there should be better ways and places to focus for better results.

    Just sayin ……. Cheers

    Dave

    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:34 am

      Thanks for the comment Dave. I would think most agents reading AG aren’t your “average” REALTOR. 😉 At least not yet. Most, if not all, of the agents I’ve encountered on AG are pretty forward thinking.

      But to address your question, the average agent shouldn’t be concerned about their PR, nor the above average agent. If you follow the SEO advice and best practices dolled out here, your site will be just fine without ever considering your PR (or tPR). 😉

      Cheerio!

  5. Phil Boren

    August 18, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Marty: I didn’t even know about (tPR), so I guess I was unaware what I should be caring about! What’s interesting to me is that I’ll have pages at BoulderHomeResource.com that rank pretty well, then I’ll post something on my integrated blog or update content (which Google values, I thought), and the PR will drop. Thanks for the info.

    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:35 am

      Hi Phil,

      As the big G updates their algorithms, etc. PR (and tPR) ebbs and flows. Another reason not to worry about it. As long as the search engines are sending you traffic you are optimizing for, you’re probably doing fine. I have pages with no PR at all that send me traffic. 🙂

  6. James Chai

    August 18, 2010 at 10:57 pm

    The statement from the Google Rep (above) says it all. There are lots of varying metrics one should look for but there is NOT an end all say to SEO. It constantly evolves and the tools we use to measure ourselves by will continually change as well.

  7. Tauranga Real Estate

    August 20, 2010 at 3:13 am

    Every agent should have a website and be concerned about page rank, especially in these tough times. The Real Estate Institute of New Zealand said on Friday that total house sales in New Zealand declined last month, while house prices also fell.

    A total of 4,411 homes were sold in the country in July – down from the 4,575 sold in June but still higher than the record low of only 3,666 sales last January. This marks the lowest residential sales turnover for a July month in ten years.

  8. SmartVestors Realty

    August 22, 2010 at 6:05 am

    I really dont care on page rank, but what matters how you serve your customers with their actual requirements, thats all about the recurrent visitation.

    Thanks,
    SmartVestors Realty

  9. Roberto Mazzoni

    October 29, 2010 at 2:40 am

    I have been keeping a blog for a couple of years now and recently I had slowed down my updates and noted that my page rank had plummeted. Now I have resumed publishing and I didn’t see an immediate change. This article has gotten me to understand that there a time delay on the process and that consistency of updates is key, as always 🙂

  10. Max Boyko - Team Hybrid

    December 18, 2010 at 7:39 pm

    Everything you can do to convert more clients these days should be used for any agent (especially the forward thinking ones). Someone mentioned why bother when you only get a 3% conversion rate… ummmm hello? You don’t want to make an extra $100k+ per year?

    30 visitors a day = 900 visitors/month
    3% conversion = 27 leads/month
    10% closing rate = 2.7 clients/month = 32 deals/year

    Depending of course where you are located will make a difference, but I think it’s safe to say $3,000 commission per deal is pretty conservative. Definitely makes it something to explore to say the least. Good luck 🙂

  11. Ryan

    November 27, 2015 at 4:55 am

    I never really cared too much about my own page rank, its the quality of links. Actual editorial links and mentions from websites that have a good PR are best. and Quality not quantity

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Business Entrepreneur

Twisted American Dream: Study shows microloans aid predatory MLMs

(ENTREPRENEUR) If microloans are being given to start new businesses, let’s give to those who are starting their own businesses rather than MLMs.

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MLMs twisting the American Dream with microloans. Image of the American dollar with collage background.

Microloans were touted as a way to help people in poverty to find a way out. Yes, the interest rates were higher, 15% – 18% for some micro-lenders, but not as high as payday loan businesses where loan interests can soar to upwards of 400%.

When you live life on the edge of financial failure, microloans are supposed to offer a helping hand to those starting their own businesses.

Enter today’s flourishing MLM market, where participants are promised if they work hard and follow the plan, they can make their way to the top of MLM glory with its promises of riches, cars, cruise vacations, and more.

Microloan companies classify MLMs as small businesses and offer loans to those who can’t use cash as collateral with their own banks to secure loans. These microloans are used to buy MLM inventory and a dream.

Grameen America is one microloan company that allows MLM inventory purchases as part of their business loan program.

“Grameen America does not advise members about their business choice or refuse loans based on business type as long as borrowers can prove their funds are being used for business purposes and the business is legal,” Grameen America told Vox reporter Kelsey Piper in an interview for a May 18 story.

“It is our experience that our members know how best to put their business loans to use and the type of business they believe will be successful for them. Our data shows many members start off in one kind of business, e.g. direct sales, and then pivot into other types of businesses as they cycle through our program.”

According to a Grameen America study, women who took out these microloans saw a positive but modest increase in monthly net income, a small increase in savings and a Vantage-Score (a type of credit score).

Their study shows that 32.7% of their customers plan on starting or have started their direct sales or MLM investment.

The company does not differentiate the overall income success of entrepreneurs who start their own businesses from those who invest in MLMs so measuring the difference in success there is not possible. However, an AARP Foundation study found that 44% of participants dropped out after less than one year of working with an MLM.

With a loan interest rate of 15% – 18% for a microloan, failure could lead women in poverty to an even worse situation than where they started.

The microloan business is not new, and the results are not hidden. As investigative stories showed in 2016, microloans aren’t lifting women out of poverty.

Encouraging women in poverty to use the loans to buy inventory in an MLM is bad business for everyone. Financial experts and even some MLM companies make it clear going into debt to join an MLM is strongly discouraged. Microloans don’t change financial fundamentals.

The Grameen America study does show positives for the women who serve as their customer base. The study stated, “Overall, the study found it was not just increased income or just the loan that led to the program’s positive effects. The weight of the evidence suggests that women who experience life circumstances similar to those in the Grameen America program are likely to be more financially resilient in the face of unexpected challenges if they are offered more options to combine work and businesses, more ways to strengthen their peer networks, and more liquidity.”

That might be true, but with an over 40% failure rate for those investing in MLMs, the risk might not be worth it.

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Social Media

*New* TikTok Insights launch: Content creators finally get audience analytics

(SOCIAL MEDIA) The popular short-form app, TikTok, finally launches the anticipated Insights feature, where content creators can view target audience data.

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Two girls filming on TikTok.

Marketers searching for the zeitgeist which means TikTok scrollers pause to watch their content and then click through to buy a product have a new tool to help make that happen.

  • TikTok Insights offers marketers bite-size bits of user demographic information that will help build content that leads to sales.
  • With TikTok Insights you can learn more about your audience’s behavior, their interests, and their general sentiment toward brands.
  • TikTok Insights is free to use. Marketers can find TikTok user demographics by using filters to determine what they’re looking for.

The demographic info can be age-focused, focused on specific types of marketing, or even as specific as holiday or event marketing.

This is a step in the direction marketers have been asking for as they create content for the TikTok platform; however, creators looking for detailed analytics like they get from meta need to wait. Insights doesn’t offer that for now.

Like TikTok says in its own analytic information,

“While analytics are helpful in understanding the performance of your videos, you don’t need to create future videos based primarily around them. It’s best to consider the bigger picture, lean lightly on analytics, and use them as a source for insight rather than strategy.”

Marketers trying to key into reaching TikTok’s billion users worldwide are left, right now, searching for the magic that leads to consumers making the jump from the platform to using their purchasing power.

For marketers that means keeping things creative and collaborative, two key factors in TikTok’s success. And that success is huge. Users spend an average of 52 minutes on the platform when they log in and a staggering 90% of users say they log on every day.

TikTok Insights will help marketers find ways to connect, but the content TikTok is looking for is authentic.

And while entrepreneurs can bid for advertising like other social media platforms, they need to remember when planning that spend, that most TikTok marketing success stories are more accidental than planned. Have fun with that knowledge. Instead of pressure to create the perfect plan, TikTok Insights allows marketers to keep it creative and to find a way to tie it into what they enjoy about the platform.

Like all other social media marketing, focus on creating content that stops the consumer from their continual scroll. Make it a challenge and keep it real.

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Opinion Editorials

Remote work or no work? Concerns about WFH vs. returning to office

(EDITORIAL) There is an ever-growing divide and concern between employers and employees regarding policies over work in office or from home.

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Work in office with headphones on, making use of flexible four-day workweek.

When the pandemic started and work from home become the uncomfortable-at-first norm, no one knew exactly where the idea of remote work for office jobs was headed.

We know now, and the office just isn’t all it was cracked up to be.

From better views and healthier lifestyles to huge decreases in childcare costs, transportation, and wardrobe expenses, many workers say they’re not interested in going back, and some bosses aren’t happy. Other managers and owners aren’t giving their employees a choice. The remote exception is gone.

In March, Apple CEO Tim Cook told employees to be prepared for a return to their campus in a hybrid model this week.

“We will begin the hybrid pilot in full on May 23, with people coming to the office three days a week — on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday — and working flexibly on Wednesday and Friday if you wish,” he said in a memo sent to staff in April.

Cook is not alone. Across corporate America, management is insisting employees return to the office.

Even President Biden chimed in during the State of the Union speech saying,

“It’s time for Americans to get back to work and fill our great downtowns again,” Biden said. “People working from home can feel safe to begin to return to the office. We’re doing that here in the federal government. The vast majority of federal workers will once again work in person.”

A Good Hire survey of 3500 American managers shows 75% of managers want a return to the office even though they said productivity did not decline during work from home. 51% believe their employees want the same thing. However, a Future Forum survey by slack found just 17% of employees want to return to the office daily and only 34% of employees want a hybrid model.

The reasons for the disconnect are plenty.

Mother.ly contributor Beau Brink shared in a column last July about the impact Work From Home has had on her employee resource group for people with disabilities, neurodiversity, and invisible illnesses.

“Even though 2020 had been hard, the upside was that we were managing our conditions better.”

Women bore much of the weight of moving work out of the office when the pandemic started.

Overall, women lost a net of 5.4 million jobs during the recession caused by the pandemic—nearly 1 million more job losses than men.

When some who had lost their jobs found new work from home employment, they also found a new perk. A raise because they no longer had to pay high childcare costs.

Employees cite better health as a reason they want to continue working from home as well. COVID numbers ebb and flow, but it’s more than that, they say. They’re able to work out, eat a more nutritious diet, and set a more casual, less stressed schedule.

In her mother.ly column, Brink brings up the fact that the company she worked for actually did better in the transition to working from home. As the Good Hire survey showed, most companies saw the same success.

“Why any CEO would push for a move backward in the name of collaboration makes my head spin.”

The why’s are many. And indicative of a possible shift in how we view work.

If most work moves to remote permanently, are employees entitled to the same benefits they’ve seen in the past? Are they actually employees or contractors?

Those questions will have to be answered. We were on the path to having to answer them before the pandemic.

Remote work isn’t new. The pandemic just pushed it to the norm, but even before COVID, technology changes were opening remote opportunities for employees.

In the Good Hire survey managers who said productivity actually increased also showed a distrust of remote work in general.

Right now though, the survey says,

“As long as there is a talent and labor shortage, employers will still have to be flexible, and even in 100% back-to-the-office situations, workers will still be able to negotiate some remote working scenarios.”

For over two years forced remote meant comfy clothes and fresh air. Will that change? We’ll see.

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