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Top 8 ways to choose a password online

In today’s world where we use dozens of logins, it is important to do ourselves a favor and make sure we have good passwords to improve security.

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Password protection tips

Password protection tips

Protecting your information

This week has been a tricky week for the web, with three major web services having been hacked, making public the user passwords of many LinkedIn, eHarmony, and Last.fm passwords, which lends to a great learning experience for web users.

Prior to this week’s password leaks, we began chatting with SplashData CEO, Morgan Slain, a leading developer of security applications. The company told AGBeat weeks ago that “We all know protecting information can be tricky, especially considering the number of passwords each individual has to keep track of. For many people, post-it notes are the destination to store personal info that should be kept more secure. From your credit card information to your Amazon login, all personal information should be store in a safe place.”

Slain recently published a list of the 25 worst web passwords, which has helped many to understand vulnerabilities.

Top 8 ways to choose a password online

Sure, many of us use the same password on all web logins, and many have had the same password since 1997, but it is time to make sure that your personal data is as secure as possible and that we aren’t restricting our own privacy by choosing poor passwords. Below, Slain has provided tips on choosing a proper password:

  • Go long: When it comes to passwords, longer is better.  Each extra character you add to a password doesn’t just add to your security, it multiplies it many times.  So aim for eight characters or more.
  • Throw out the dictionary: Never use a word you can find in the dictionary as a password, no matter how long or obscure the word is.  Hackers have tools that quickly check every single word in the dictionary.
  • Be creative: Most people choose passwords that are easy to remember. That makes their passwords common and easy to guess. So don’t be predictable and base your password on a person’s name, a pet’s name, a team name, a nickname, a pattern on the keyboard, or a string of numbers in sequence.
  • Mix it up: The strongest passwords contain a combination of letters, numbers, and other characters on the keyboard.
  • Phrase it: A great way to create secure passwords that are easy to remember is to use pass phrases by connecting short words with spaces or other characters.  For example, “box it up” or “back-and-4th” or “jack+my+car!”
  • Be different: One of the biggest mistakes people make with passwords is to use the same username/password combination  over and over again for different websites. This is dangerous because hackers are increasingly targeting sites with weak security and then using the username/password combinations they find on many other websites.
  • Double down: create your most secure passwords for email accounts (like Gmail and Yahoo Mail) and financial accounts (especially PayPal, online banking, and credit cards).  These are the most valuable accounts you have, so they deserve the most protection.  The email account is important because it can be used to reset passwords on many sites (with the ubiquitous “forgot password” feature).  So even if you feel like you don’t have the time or energy to make your passwords better for general websites, be sure your passwords for your email and financial accounts are strong and different than the ones you use for general interest sites.
  • Stay organized: How do you remember all of your different long, strong passwords? Try using a password manager like SplashID Safe. This kind of application creates a digital safe for you on your computer or phone. You just remember one single secure master password, and then you can access all of your other passwords organized by type and category. The application can then even log you in to websites so you don’t have to type usernames and passwords over and over again. Choose a well reviewed password program from a company with a long and reliable history.

The American Genius (AG) is news, insights, tools, and inspiration for business owners and professionals. AG condenses information on technology, business, social media, startups, economics and more, so you don’t have to.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Roland Estrada

    June 8, 2012 at 1:05 pm

    The two most mentioned password mangers in the tech community are LastPass.com and 1Password – agilebits.com.

  2. Pingback: Zuck's stupid easy password cracked, is yours next? - The American Genius

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Dittach: Chrome extension keeps your Gmail files ultra organized

(PRODUCTIVITY) Reclaim your time with Dittach and quit digging through Gmail files for that needle in the haystack.

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dittach

So, have you ever been sent a picture of something in your Gmail and lost it for a few weeks? What about a copy of a form you need to sign? What about a document for your boss? If you’re sharing a lot of files in your Gmail, you may have a hard time keeping track of it all.

That’s where Dittach hopes to get back a bit of your time.

It’s a free Chrome extension that works with your Gmail to help organize those attachments in a way that’s a lot more efficient than the built-in filter – especially if you have thousands of emails in your Gmail.

The attachment adds a side bar to your inbox and displays thumbnails of the files you’ve received and sent, and that includes documents, audio, and video (most images of the sidebar sort by other, photos, docs, pdfs, movies, and music). There’s a date scroller to help you go through dates, and it even works with your search bar. And of course, you can then forward, download, print, or view the message that is attached.

Dittach captures the key elements of a good productivity app – it’s both incredibly intuitive to use, and it addresses a productivity need by creating time.

The applications of this software are vast if you use Gmail to manage your life, business, life + business, business + side gig + other gig + shopping addiction, or whatever permutation works for your life. If you have any privacy concerns: Dittach doesn’t make any changes to your account, emails, or attachments, and the extension can be removed anytime.

The biggest concern with Dittach actually comes from Google itself – it’s limited to how many attachments it can index every day, so older attachments may not appear initially during that first day – so if you have a lot of older stuff it may not capture them. The app is also in beta, so you may have some bugs with the experience, but it looks very promising. At the time of my review, the feature isn’t working due to a transition, but is expected to be back up soon.

Dittach ultimately is a great Gmail addition if you find yourself handling a great deal of attachments and need a way to quickly find them. Beyond business, I could see the applications of this for graduate students, working professionals, or even digitally connected families. There’s a lot of promise here, if you have the need – so if you use Chrome and Gmail – get Dittached from time wasting (when it’s available, of course).

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FCC Chairman confirms fears, jokes about being a Verizon shill

(TECH NEWS) FCC Chairman Ajit Pai jokes about being a shill for Verizon, feeding into what many suspected when he was appointed.

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ajit pai speaking

Leaked video shows FCC Chairman Ajit Pai joking about being a shill for Verizon, as we all suspected when he was nominated. Last week Pai was a speaker at the Federal Communications Bar Association, an event similar to the White House Correspondents Dinner.

Major telecom companies and the FCC gather at this annual event for dinner, mingling, and enduring awkward political policy jokes. At the event, Pai roasted himself about major headlines from the past year, like his decision to kill net neutrality against the wishes of the majority of the nation. Hilarious.

Pai also brought up the whole thing where he refused to cooperate with an investigation into the validity of comments filed in support of ending net neutrality.

Although cameras weren’t officially present at the event, someone surreptitiously filmed and sent the clip to Gizmodo. The kicker comes around twenty minutes into Pai’s speech when he jokes, “in collusion—I mean, in conclusion, sorry, my bad—many people are still shell-shocked that I’m up here tonight.”

He goes on, “they ask themselves, how on earth did this happen? Well, moments before tonight’s dinner, somebody leaked a fourteen-year-old video that helps answer that question, and in all candor, I can no longer hide from the truth.”

Pai then starts a video, which opens with 50 Cent’s “In Da Club” playing in the background. This is the only thing I’ll give him points for on this amateur drama class project.

The skit is set in 2003 at “Verizon’s DC Office”, when Pai was an attorney for the company. In the video, Kathy Grillo, current Verizon senior VP and deputy general counsel, tells Pai, “As you know, the FCC is captured by the industry, but we think it’s not captured enough, so we have a plan.”

“What plan?” Pai asks. Grillo tells him, “We want to brainwash and groom a Verizon puppet to install as FCC chairman. Think ‘Manchurian Candidate.’” To which Pai responds, “That sounds awesome!”

Gizmodo posted the video on Friday after the dinner, and the internet exploded with reactions to Pai’s gag. Reddit in particular went nuts, to the point that one thread in r/technology was locked—as in no one else can comment—for “too much violence.”

In a thread on the r/television subreddit, a moderator reminds users, “please refrain from encouraging or inciting violence or posting personal information […] don’t post anything inviting harassment, don’t harass, and don’t cheer on or upvote obvious vigilantism.”

While some of the threads were full of awful remarks, other posters commented in the spirit of reasonable conversation. The general sentiment of those engaged in non-harassing discussions is that Pai is a symptom, not the cause of FCC’s problems.

However, many argued that the video showed Pai’s willingness to bend (then joke about) FCC regulations indicates he’s not a puppet so much as a willing participant in corruption. Pai’s appointment to FCC Chairman was suspicious from the beginning considering his ties to Verizon.

Although Pai is obviously joking in the leaked video, the general public isn’t find it nearly as funny as those at the dinner.

Check out the clip for some cringe-worthy digs at net neutrality and have fun questioning the integrity of the FCC.

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Tech News

FCC Grinches plan to steal poor peoples’ Internet access

(TECH NEWS) Merry Christmas! The FCC is trying to take away poor people’s Internet access, pointing the finger one way to distract you from the other.

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ajit pai net neutrality

In case anybody with enough bandwidth to read this wasn’t sufficiently terrified by the FCC’s ongoing campaign to break the internet by dismantling net neutrality, the nation’s communication authority has kindly provided another reason for any digital-enabled American to expatriate and/or secede.

The FCC’s most recent reform proposal proposes to reform the absolute Hell out of Lifeline, the $2.25 billion program to provide low-income Americans with broadband Internet access. Also, phones. The Lifeline Program has been doing its job since 1985, when noted socialist firebrand Ronald Reagan instituted it to subsidize phone service in underprivileged communities. It was expanded to include broadband Internet access in 2016, and right now 12 million households benefit from Lifeline-subsidized phone and Internet access.

That’s apparently a problem.

The FCC’s stated concern is that the General Accounting Office recently found $1.2 million of the $2.25 billion Lifeline budget was being used fraudulently. Fraud is bad! But in case you don’t have your TI-85 handy, that’s less than a tenth of 1 percent. That is not very much fraud. Not enough to nix an entire program, at least.

The greater concern, as usual, appears to be about profit. Under the current Lifeline guidelines, many subsidized companies are small ISPs and resellers providing access to third-party networks. Often, these services are the only Internet access available in rural areas, tribal lands, and other underserved communities.

That doesn’t work for Commissioner Pai.

Earlier this year, Pai used “delegated authority,” the FCC’s version of executive orders, to bypass oversight and personally rescind subsidy access from 9 ISPs providing services to rural areas and tribal lands.

These reforms continue that trend. They ban subsidies for no-cost Internet service, which is the business model of 70% of current Lifeline subsidy recipients. It is notably not the business model of large ISPs that rhyme with Buhrizon. I’m sure that’s a coincidence.

They also impose an absolute budget cap, meaning that millions of poor households could lose their Internet access, and the increased opportunities for education and employment that come with it, if someone in a comfy office a thousand miles away effs up the accounting.

In short, it sucks.

The proposed reforms to the Lifeline Project are another example of the FCC, deliberately or through negligence, rigging the market in favor of major conglomerates at the expense of consumers, small businesses and the general public.

Lifeline isn’t perfect, but it’s doing its job. Whether the same can be said for Ajit Pai’s FCC is, at best, an open question.

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