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New to Social Media? – Challenges

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This past week, Gia Freer and I were invited to speak at a panel for the Master Brokers Forum in Boca Raton, FL.  The panel’s subject was “Navigating the Social Media Ocean:  Facebook, Blogging and Beyond”.   Questions were prepared before the panel, answers rehearsed……but things changed a bit when we arrived at the venue.

The average age of attendees was late 50’s – everyone there was a top producing agent with years in the business and successful businesses at that.  So why were these people interested in Social Media for their business?  Some were just curious and had no intention to even venture into trying something new, but a lot of them, to my surprise, recognized that it was important to at least get their feet wet and see what all the commotion was about.

The first question – and one I will share because we need to ponder and then ponder some more, was:

If I’m new to social media, what are the three most important things I should do RIGHT NOW?

Some of us have been at this for a while and going back to basics may seem a bit trivial and useless….but guess what??  If you really think about this question, it may simplify your social media marketing strategy today.

Gia answered the following:

  1. Put up profiles NOW (in Twitter, Facebook and Linked In)
  2. Start at Blog
  3. Change your business cards  (include your social media stuff)

Denise Reynolds (aka @LuxuryWriter), third panelist and Luxury writer shared 5 stages of twitter acceptance and everyone in the room could relate to at least one of those stages – priceless information, from Influential Marketing Blog:

5 Stages of Twitter Acceptance

If this doesn’t help you identify your goals on Twitter….I don’t know what will.

I of course tried to be funny and said:

  1. get a computer (the crowd burst into laughter….but I saw a couple of nods in the crowd as well)
  2. stop using 20 year old photos for your marketing – when your client finally engages you online and then meets you in person, you will scare them away.
  3. drop the “fear factor” – you can’t get started if you are afraid

And lastly, earlier that day, I took the question to Twitter and received the following responses:

twitter question answeredtwitter question answered

Most of you reading this are way beyond the “beginner” point – but some of you may have started blindly and without direction.  I think the basics that need to be understood before you can really begin to reap benefits is to understand SM reach (the fact that you have access to your Sphere of influence’s sphere) and the fact that the medium is used to engage and make connections.  The most trivial moves in any of the platforms may lead to meaningful conversation and possibly a business relationship.  Stop telling people about your achievements and start asking others about theirs, the days of Interruption Marketing are over ….and… the Interwebs have no age cut off!


Ines is all Miami, all the time. A Miami Beach Realtor® with Majestic properties, Ines authors Miamism.com, PrimeMiamiBeach.com, and MiamismPix.com and is always on communication's leading edge. She goes out of her way to engage and be engaged, often using Mojitos to keep the mood light and give everything she does a Miami flavor. You can find her goofing off or instigating trouble at Twitter, Flickr, Facebook or LinkedIn.

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28 Comments

28 Comments

  1. Hilary Marsh, REALTOR.org

    October 26, 2009 at 1:58 pm

    Great post, Ines — there’s so much useful information in here!

    –Hilary Marsh, Managing Director, REALTOR.org

  2. Kelly

    October 26, 2009 at 3:43 pm

    Including your social media on your business cards is a great tip. I never even thought of that. Thanks!

  3. Ines Hegedus-Garcia

    October 26, 2009 at 5:23 pm

    @HilaryMarsh THANK YOU!! it was a really great group of people and the questions afterwards were so relevant and useful – because of the fact that they all have successful businesses.

    Kelly (you can thank @giabfreer for that) 🙂

  4. Derek Overbey

    October 26, 2009 at 5:34 pm

    This is a great post as always Ines. People can’t really experience the power of social media until they start participating in social media…the right way. Too many real estate friends of mine discount it before even giving it a proper shot.

    Social media may not be for everyone and I get that but it’s so great to hear stories like this one of successful people being opened minded and willing to learn something new.

    Derek

  5. Ines Hegedus-Garcia

    October 26, 2009 at 5:53 pm

    @Dorverbey even if it means starting off with a widget on their site – had one lady come up to me (in her late 60’s), with a multi-million dollar business and 30 plus years telling me she was incorporating some SM tools to help her connect with her already established European clientele.

    I was very pleasantly surprised as well

  6. HowardArnoff

    October 26, 2009 at 9:43 pm

    Time to move from 3 to 4, thanks Ines.

  7. MIssy Caulk

    October 26, 2009 at 10:06 pm

    Those 5 stages of Twitter Acceptance are so true.
    Some of us move through the stages a lot quicker. I think I’m still between 4 and 5.
    Honestly on Twitter I mostly connect with other conservatives and not Realtors so much anymore.

  8. Ken Brand

    October 26, 2009 at 10:25 pm

    What’s Social Media?

    Seriously, this is useful information. Thanks.

  9. Gia Freer

    October 27, 2009 at 5:25 am

    Ines…Fantastic post…you would be surprised how many folks love the fact that they know what sites I am on by my business card alone (they don’t have to write it down ’cause it’s already there). They can look me up, befriend me and have an online conversation easily and they tell everyone else they know about it 😀

  10. Ines Hegedus-Garcia

    October 27, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Howard – the stages of twitter are a wake-up call to many 🙂

    Missy, and you can move backwards too – again….after you define your goals and know what you are using the medium for

    Ken – love seeing older people embrace new ideas, especially when it comes to the Internet

    Gia – the idea of a landing page is not a bad one either – I created one but still waiting for my domain https://ineshegedusgarcia.wordpress.com/ or https://marianawagner.wordpress.com/ or https://www.jeffturner.info/

  11. teresa boardman

    October 28, 2009 at 7:20 am

    seriously after writing a blog for more than 4 years I have concluded that it isn’t for everyone. I always suggest it because it is powerful but most won’t do it or stick to it or post often enough to get any traction

  12. Doc Reiss

    October 29, 2009 at 11:01 pm

    Ines,

    I cannot thank you enough. I have been studying and listening to “experts” explain about social marketing, but no one has made it resound as you have. I feel as if I have been comfortably moved into a new realm by a guiding, reassuring hand. Thank you.

  13. ines

    October 30, 2009 at 10:01 am

    @tboard interestingly enough, some people use other mediums within SM and get great results as well without blogging – I just don’t know what I would do without by hub

    Doc – and don’t forget that many of us are available to help….so just knock on our virtual doors if you need anything

  14. Sherrie Cook

    November 1, 2009 at 6:24 am

    Your information is good, and I look forward to receiving more useful recommendations and opinions to consider.

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Business Marketing

Tired of “link in bio”? Here is a solution for Instagram linking

(MARKETING) The days of only one link in your Instagram bio are over. Alls.Link not only lets you link more, it gives you options for marketing and analytics too.

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Woman checking Instagram on phone

If you’re like me, you’ve probably swapped out the link in your Instagram bio 100 times. Do I share my website? A link to a product? A recent publication? Well, now you don’t have to choose!

Alls.Link is a subscription-based program that allows you to, among other things, have multiple links in your bio. I’m obsessed with the Instagram add-ons that are helping business owners to expand the platform to further engage their audiences – and this is NEEDED one.

With the basic membership ($8/month), you get up to 10 customizable Biolink Pages with shortened links (and you’ll be able to choose your own backend). You also get access to Google Analytics and Facebook Pixel for your pages. With the basic membership, you will have Alls.Link advertising on your Biolink Page. Plus, you’ll be allotted a total of 10 projects, and Biolink Pages with 20 customizable domains.

With the premium membership ($15/month), you get link scheduling for product drops and article releases, SEO and UTM parameters, and you’ll have the ability to link more socials on the Biolink Page. With this membership, you’re allotted 20 projects and Biolink Pages with 60 customizable domains.

If you’re unsure about whether or not Alls.Link is worth it (or which membership is best for you), there is a free trial option in which you’ll be granted all the premium membership capabilities.

Overall – premium membership or not – I have to say, the background colors and font choices are really fun and will take your Biolink Page to the next level. Alls.Link is definitely a program to consider if your business has a substantial Insta following and you have a lot of external material you want to share with your followers.

The day-by-day statistics are a great tool for knowing what your audience is interested in and what links are getting the most clicks. Also, the ability to incorporate Google Analytics into the mix is a big plus, especially if you’re serious about metrics.

If you have a big team (or manage multiple pages), I would suggest going premium just for the sheer quantity of domains you can customize and link, though there are various other reasons I’d also suggest to do so. Take a look and see what works for you!

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Business Marketing

Use the ‘Blemish Effect’ to skyrocket your sales

(MARKETING) The Blemish Effect dictates that small, adjacent flaws in a product can make it that much more interesting—is perfection out?

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blemish effect

Presenting a product or service in its most immaculate, polished state has been the strategy for virtually all organizations, and overselling items with known flaws is a practice as old as time. According to marketing researchers, however, this approach may not be the only way to achieve optimal results due to something known as the “Blemish Effect.”

The Blemish Effect isn’t quite the inverse of the perfectionist product pitch; rather, it builds on the theory that small problems with a product or service can actually throw into relief its good qualities. For example, a small scratch on the back of an otherwise pristine iPhone might draw one’s eye to the glossy finish, while an objectively perfect housing might not be appreciated in the same way.

The same goes for mildly bad press or a customer’s pros and cons list. If someone has absolutely no complaints or desires for whatever you’re marketing, the end result can look flat and lacking in nuance. Having the slightest bit of longing associated with an aspect (or lack thereof) of your business means that you have room to grow, which can be tantalizing for the eager consumer.

A Stanford study indicates that small doses of mildly negative information may actually strengthen a consumer’s positive impression of a product or service. Interesting.

Another beneficial aspect of the Blemish Effect is that it helps consumers focus their negativity. “Too good to be true” often means exactly that, and we’re eager to criticize where possible. If your product or service has a noticeable flaw which doesn’t harm the item’s use, your audience might settle for lamenting the minor flaw and favoring the rest of the product rather than looking for problems which don’t exist.

This concept also applies to expectation management. Absent an obvious blemish, it can be all to easy for consumers to envision your product or service on an unattainable level.

When they’re invariably disappointed that their unrealistic expectations weren’t fulfilled, your reputation might take a hit, or consumers might lose interest after the initial wave.

The takeaway is that consumers trust transparency, so in describing your offering, tossing in a negative boosts the perception that you’re being honest and transparent, so a graphic artist could note that while their skills are superior and their pricing reasonable, they take their time with intricate projects. The time expectation is a potentially negative aspect of their service, but expressing anything negative improves sales as it builds trust.

It should be noted that the Blemish Effect applies to minor impairments in cosmetic or adjacent qualities, not in the product or service itself. Delivering an item which is inherently flawed won’t make anyone happy.

In an age where less truly is more, the Blemish Effect stands to dictate a new wave of honesty in marketing.

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Business Marketing

Google Chrome will no longer allow premium extensions

(MARKETING) In banning extension payments through their own platform, Google addresses a compelling, if self-created, issue on Chrome.

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Google Chrome open on a laptop on a organized desk.

Google has cracked down on various practices over the past couple of years, but their most recent target—the Google Chrome extensions store—has a few folks scratching their heads.
Over the span of the next few months, Google will phase out paid extensions completely, thus ending a bizarre and relatively negligible corner of internet economy.

This decision comes on the heels of a “temporary” ban on the publication of new premium extensions back in March. According to Engadget, all aspects of paid extension use—including free trials and in-app purchases—will be gone come February 2021.

To be clear, Google’s decision won’t prohibit extension developers from charging customers to use their products; instead, extension developers will be required to find alternative methods of requesting payment. We’ve seen this model work on a donation basis with extensions like AdBlock. But shifting to something similar on a comprehensive scale will be something else entirely.

Interestingly, Google’s angle appears to be in increasing user safety. The Verge reports that their initial suspension of paid extensions was put into place as a response to products that included “fraudulent transactions”, and Google’s subsequent responses since then have comprised more user-facing actions such as removing extensions published by different parties that accomplish replica tasks.

Review manipulation, use of hefty notifications as a part of an extension’s operation, and generally spammy techniques were also eyeballed by Google as problem points in their ongoing suspension leading up to the ban.

In banning extension payments through their own platform, Google addresses a compelling, if self-created, issue. The extension store was a relatively free market in a sense—something that, given the number of parameters being enforced as of now, is less true for the time being.

Similarly, one can only wonder about which avenues vendors will choose when seeking payment for their services in the future. It’s entirely possible that, after Google Chrome shuts down payments in February, the paid section of the extension market will crumble into oblivion, the side effects of which we can’t necessarily picture.

For now, it’s probably best to hold off on buying any premium extensions; after all, there’s at least a fighting chance that they’ll all be free come February—if we make it that far.

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