Connect with us

Business News

How to build shopper loyalty (it’s cheaper, more effective then earning new customers)

If it’s less expensive to hang on to a current customer, how exactly does one go about building shopper loyalty?

Published

on

shopper loyalty

Once you earn a customer, hang on for dear life!

Entrepreneurs and new business owners often fail to appreciate the difficulty of attracting new customers. Entrepreneur magazine refers to this as “field of dreams marketing.” It is assumed that unlocking the shop or advertising a service will result in customers coming through the door or ringing the phone. In reality, however, getting new customers is an expensive and lengthy endeavor.

bar
This is why experienced businesspeople will do all they can to hang onto a customer once they have one. It is significantly cheaper and more effective to keep an existing customer than get a new one. That does not mean it is easy to keep them though. What are some best practices for building shopper loyalty?

Know what customers want

First, great companies know what their customers want. This does not mean successful entrepreneurs must be telepathic. Nor do they need to give every customer a survey at the cash register (please no more). In retail, most customers are signaling what they expect when they walk into a store. If it is a clothing store, they just might be there for some clothes. If it is a coffee shop, guess what? They want coffee.

Businesses occasionally spend far too much time and money on the assumption customers might want something other than the items already on the shelf. Nobody proves this point better that Google. One of the most successful companies of our time still rolls out their flagship product as a simple search field in the center of a big white space. They know people who go to a search engine just want to search.

Give customers what they want

Second, great companies give their customers what they want. If a customer enters an electronics store to purchase a phone and the clerk spends 20 minutes trying to sell her a tablet, selfie-stick, or camera, then the customer’s satisfaction level will be low. Perhaps she will purchase the phone, but she will not be eager for a return trip. Had the clerk simply sold a great phone, the customer just might have popped back in sometime for that tablet.

Today’s shoppers value their time, are well informed about products, and typically know what they want when they enter a shop. Major American cable companies are learning this the hard way as customers leave them in droves for smaller, nimbler streaming services that will simply give them what they want without pressing them to pay for many channels they have no interest in.

Give customers more than they want

Third, successful businesses give customers more than they want. This is not the same as selling them more than they want to buy. For example, if you walk into the Asian coffee retailer J.Co and order a cup of coffee they will give you a donut too. Surprise! No one complains about a free donut. Even customers who refuse it for health reasons will be impressed that it was offered. That extra benefit, although small, draws people back. Giving away donuts is much cheaper than advertising for new customers and it eventually increases sales.

How to apply this principle will depend on the particular business. A cleaning company can refill the bathroom soaps, a bakery can include a serving knife, and a dress shop can give away a nice garment bag. To be most effective, these should be unadvertised surprises. They are not a benefit the customer is paying for; rather they are examples of going above a beyond. These little extras increase customer loyalty and will improve sales.

Give customers excellent value

Fourth, the best companies give customers an excellent value on what they want. There are few shoppers in this world with truly unlimited budgets. In reality, most people are motivated by good prices. Walmart climbed to the top of the retail world with its motto, “Always the lowest price. Always.” This does not mean a business should strive to be the cheapest option every time. However, it does mean that customers should never be overcharged and pricing schemes should be clear.

Start-up companies are sometimes tempted to overprice goods and services because they are desperately trying to build good income streams. This is a temptation that must be avoided. Customers who feel they are getting what they want at a reasonable price will likely return for more. If they do, it will not take long for new businesses to grow a healthy income.

The Golden Rule is really golden

Knowing what a customer wants, giving it to them (with a little extra), and at a good price will draw them back again and again. Implementing these ideas is not rocket science. New business people can find inspiration by imagining themselves on the other side of the counter. What would they want if they were doing the shopping?

“Do unto others as you would want them to do unto you” is a great rule for building customer loyalty. The results can be truly golden.

#ShopperLoyalty

Stephen St. John is a writer and speaker with a background in business, education, and non-profit ministry. He earned his Bachelor's Degree in Organizational Management and Master's Degree in Theological and Ministerial Studies. Alongside his wife and seven kids, Stephen has lived and worked in North America, Africa, and Asia.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Study: No one wants to deal with customer service reps anymore - The American Genius

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business News

How employers should react to the new age discrimination court ruling

(BUSINESS NEWS) A court case that could likely land in the Supreme Court is one that all employers should react to and prepare for.

Published

on

age discrimination

In January, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals determined that then 58-year-old Dale Kleber did not get protection against age discrimination from CareFusion as a job applicant.

For employers, there are some important takeaways. Namely, that Kleber v CareFusion does not give employers open season to only hire young workers.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) protects employees against age discrimination. There are also protections against disparate treatment under ADEA.

Basically, employers cannot intentionally discriminate against aged applicants. When posting a job, that means you should never advertise for someone under the age of 40 when posting job descriptions.

While Federal law may not apply to older applicants, the Texas Labor Code,  for example prohibits discrimination against people over 40 years of age. Employers should be very aware of inequity throughout the hiring process, whether you’re looking at internal or external candidates. You do not want to be a test case for age discrimination.

How can you avoid violating ADEA and other applicable laws?

First, you should work with your legal counsel and HR department to make sure you are following the law. If you are accused of age discrimination, you should talk to your lawyer before responding. It’s a serious complaint that you shouldn’t try to answer on your own.

Next, go through your job postings to make them age-neutral unless there is a reason for hiring someone under the age of 40. The legal term for this is Bona Fide Occupational Definition. The qualifications can’t be arbitrary. There must be industry standards that determine a definable group of employees cannot perform the job safely.  

Words in applications matter. Don’t ask for GPA or SAT scores. Avoid things like “digital native,” “high-energy,” or “overqualified.” These terms indicate that you’re looking for someone young.  

You should also update application forms that request birthdays or graduation dates. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, you should structure interviews around skill sets, not personal information.

Train those responsible for hiring about the current laws in your state.

Make your managers aware of bias, both conscious and unconscious. It’s not age discrimination that runs afoul of the law, and you must be prepared to confront any situation where it occurs.

Talk about age bias and discrimination in your workplace. Don’t assume that older workers aren’t tech savvy or that they don’t want to keep their skills current. Instead of putting generations against each other, have a multigeneration workplace.

Continue Reading

Business News

Cities are fighting back against the motorized scooter companies

(BUSINESS NEWS) The scooter wars are on, and major cities are filled with them – residents and government are finally fighting back.

Published

on

bird scooters

When the scooter-pocalypse began, it seemed to come out of nowhere. One day, the most annoying thing in downtown traffic was maybe a pedicab, and then the next: a swarm of zippy electric razor scooters.

This sudden arrival was by design: companies like Lime and Uber’s JUMP simply just began offering their services. There was no negotiation with the city, no opportunity even for residents to say whether or not the scooter pick-up stations could be located in front of their houses—just a sudden horde of scooters (for the record, this do-it-first and then ask permission approach was replicated in all major cities across the United States).

Was this illegal? Nope. There was nothing on the law books about the rental scooter technology so there was technically nothing wrong with the companies just assuming that they could do what they wanted. (Some scooterists have since come to think the same thing, committing crimes and breaking rules.)

Now, enough time has passed for cities to have the opportunity to fight back, as a new year of legislative sessions has begun. San Francisco is one such community, which determined that only permitted companies could operate within the city limits—and, surprise, many of the don’t-ask-permission companies were not given these permits.

Lime, blocked from operating, filed a suit against the city saying that they had been discriminated against based on their … rude … arrival.

A judge has since ruled that there was no bias in the city’s review of the permit applications that were later not awarded to Lime.

As the legislation and the lawsuits play out over the next year, it will be interesting to see if the scooter company’s attitudes toward the cities they operate in change.

If, as they have said all along, they desire to be the next major innovation in urban infrastructure, then they need to be prepared to work with and grow alongside the communities that they inhabit.

It would be a wise move, then, to partner with local governments to ensure that both organizations are working in the best interest of the populations that they serve. 

Continue Reading

Business News

One state could make it illegal to ask a job applicant’s age, graduation dates

(CAREER) A recent court ruling makes ageism against job applicants legal, but at least one state is taking action.

Published

on

ageism job applicants

In late 2018, the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago ruled 8-4 that Congress intended the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) to only cover current employees, not job applicants during late 2018 with the case Kleber v. CareFusion Inc.

The verdict seemed to confirm what many older applicants have experienced: while they may have the necessary qualifications for a position they are often overlooked for younger candidates. The confirmed legality of such dishonorable bias is disheartening.

One state is stepping up to rectify this practice: Connecticut. Democratic Reps. Derek Slap of West Hartford and Robyn Porter of New Haven have proposed legislation that would fight ageism in hiring processes by making it illegal for employer to ask applicants for their dates of birth or school graduation dates.

According to the Hartford Courant, when asked about the legislation’s intention, Rep. Slap replied that such questions, “allow employers to vet our seniors before they even go in to their job interview.”

Candidates who may be older and entering the job market should keep their wits about them. While they are creating and reviewing their resumes and cover letters, they should reach out to other people in their field and make sure that they aren’t using dated conventions.

If they are pressed to provide information that indicate their ages during in-person interviews. Even if the questions are technically legal, applicants can try to assuage fears of being out-of-touch wit current market trends or technology by coming prepared to the discussion ready to highlight recent projects or experiences that illustrate on-the-pulse market fluency.  (For more tips on how to deal with these kind of awkward situations, check out this article.)

The initiative that Connecticut has taken in addressing this problem is likely to inspire more lawmakers across the country to follow suit.

But we don’t have to wait for it to be illegal for people to understand that this practice is unfair. If you are not an older candidate but an existing employee (and therefore covered by laws that say age discrimination is illegal), keep an eye out for how you, your colleagues, and your company speak about more experienced workers.  Sometimes the quickest way to change harmful practices is by having a direct conversation about an uncomfortable topic. 

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories