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Planet 13, the largest cannabis dispensary, is about to get a whole lot bigger

(BUSINESS NEWS) Larry Scheffler, the co-founder and co-CEO of Planet-13, shares his experience as his baby turns 2 years old.

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Exterior of Planet 13 building with red filter.

“One of our competitors said when we first opened: ‘just give it 6 months and they’ll be a Korean BBQ’.” Larry Scheffler – co-Founder and co-CEO of Planet 13 dispensary— recalled fondly to me last Friday. “We like proving them wrong.”

Planet-13, which turned two years old on November 1st, isn’t your average dispensary. This place has an 80-foot infinity entertainment wall, a Willie Wonka style production-line that utilizes robotic arms to make cannabis products, and a partnership with Mike Tyson! Very Vegas!

And though it’s already the largest dispensary in the world, it’s about to get a whole lot bigger this year.

For Scheffler, who seems to love just about every part of his job, the fun is just beginning.

A little history on Planet 13: As Las Vegas politicians, Scheffler and Bob Groesbeck – the other “co-” – got started in the cannabis industry right from the get-go of legalization. “We decided to get into it. It was more brains than guts, but we did it”, remembered Scheffler.

The two partners opened a small dispensary in 2018 that catered to Vegas’s 2.3 million locals, though the store faced considerable competition. After some thought, they decided to go big: why not make a superstore and entertainment venue for the 50 million tourists that come through the city each year?

By conducting zoning checks (dispensaries aren’t allowed to be within a mile of the Las Vegas Strip), Groesbeck was able to find the perfect location for Planet 13 right on the edge of the Gaming Corridor. Thus, Planet 13 became an inextricable staple on the Strip and has been excelling better than anyone had anticipated ever since – last month with Vegas at a 50% tourism capacity, Planet 13 saw 7.8 million in revenue, which is their second highest month to date.

With Planet 13 being the giant money maker that it is, I was delightfully surprised to learn that the superstore has been supporting Vegas locals during the pandemic.

“Before COVID, we only did about 14% locals but of course with COVID we had to turn around on a dime and do 100% locals, no tourists.” Said Scheffler, who told me that they were offering 20%-50% discounts to Vegas residents, as well extensive delivery options to those who need their medicine but can’t pick it up. “We have 27 vehicles and 100 drivers to make deliveries, and 24 people full-time on the phones to take orders.”

Besides the new expansion, which he anticipates to be finished by the start of Q1, Scheffler is focused on extending the Planet 13 model to new cities. As the more creative mind of the two partners (Scheffler ran a very successful graphics company for 42 years), he loves the challenge of coming up with individualized, innovative ways to bring his brand to different spaces. “I enjoy figuring out what works in a town, what the people like to see.”

At the end of the day, Scheffler is confident that Planet 13 will simply keep growing – he anticipates sales will double the moment tourism picks back up in Vegas, hence the expansion. He hopes every customer has as much fun with the shopping experience as he has in providing it: “I love it, It’s not even a job, it’s fun coming to work and creating something new every time”.

If you find yourself in Vegas and in need of some cannabis, food, or simply wild theatrics (there is no shortage of that on the Strip!), check out the massive, ever growing Disney Land-esque dispensary right at the edge of the Corridor. I sincerely doubt it will disappoint.

Happy 2nd birthday, Planet 13!

Anaïs DerSimonian is a writer, filmmaker, and educator interested in media, culture and the arts. She is Clark University Alumni with a degree in Culture Studies and Screen Studies. She has produced various documentary and narrative projects, including a profile on an NGO in Yerevan, Armenia that provides micro-loans to cottage industries and entrepreneurs based in rural regions to help create jobs, self-sufficiency, and to stimulate the post-Soviet economy. She is currently based in Boston. Besides filmmaking, Anaïs enjoys reading good fiction and watching sketch and stand-up comedy.

Business News

Startup seeks to streamline your software shopping search

(BUSINESS) This startup with a waitlist wants to help you shop for software without having to tear your hair out, become an expert, or hire a consultant.

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software shopping with testbox

Software shopping is, undoubtedly, one of the most crucial aspects of any successful business: Choose correctly, and you’ll find yourself seamlessly moving through daily operations, while a poor choice often results in a lack of efficiency. Unfortunately, the shopping aspect is anything but efficient, with demos and sales meetings lasting for unnecessarily long periods of time. That’s where TestBox comes into play.

TestBox is a tool born out of frustrated necessity. According to creator Sam Senior, “The inspiration for TestBox came from repeatedly hearing just how incredibly frustrating the software buying experience is…I heard similar stories where buyers felt that the process was all on the sales team’s terms, often taking many months, and without all the information and access they needed to be truly confident in their decision.”

It’s a tale as old as time: Sales teams effectively hold your time hostage, planning meetings and tech demos in controlled environments; you, in turn, receive a partial truth regarding the product you’re considering, and at the end of the process, you feel pressured into purchasing the product–if for no other reason than you’ve already dedicated a full workweek (or, heaven forbid, month) to it.

TestBox offers a simple, elegant solution to this problem: the ability to compare multiple tools that have been selected for your needs. One need only specify their software requirements in the TestBox menu to receive a list of software that fits those requirements, complete with “guided walkthroughs for each software and use case.”

There’s also a side-by-side comparison feature for different software types, allowing you to make a truly informed decision using your data and interfaces rather than relying on a scripted demo.

Finally, TestBox provides graphics to show pros and cons from an efficiency standpoint for each tool you test; once you make a decision, TestBox connects you with the software provider to complete your purchase.

It should be noted that TestBox is free to use. According to their website, their revenue comes via commission for facilitating a software purchase, and since that commission is fairly uniform rather than varying per tool, TestBox assures you that their presentation of each option is not swayed in the process.

TestBox also partners with ZenDesk, HubSpot, and FreshDesk, so make of that what you will.

Currently, TestBox has a waitlist for use. They plan on adding a variety of CRM and Customer Success options to their client list soon.

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Business News

Asking the wrong questions can ruin your job opportunity

(BUSINESS NEWS) An HR expert discusses the best (and worst) questions she’s experienced during candidate interviews. it’s best to learn from others mistakes.

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interview candidates answers

When talking to hiring managers outside of an interview setting, I always find myself asking about their horror stories as they’re usually good for a laugh (and a crash course in what not to do in an interview). A good friend of mine has worked in HR for the last decade and has sat in on her fair share of interviews, so naturally I asked her what some of her most notable experiences were with candidates – the good and the bad, in her own words…

“Let’s see, I think the worst questions I’ve ever had are typically related to benefits or vacation as it demonstrates that their priorities are not focused on the actual job they will be performing. I’ve had candidates ask how much vacation time they’ll receive during an initial phone screen (as their only question!). I’ve also had them ask about benefits and make comparisons to me over the phone about how our benefits compare to their current employer.

I once had a candidate ask me about the age demographics of our office, which was very uncomfortable and inappropriate! They were trying to determine if the attorneys at our law firm were older than the ones they were currently supporting. It was quite strange!

I also once had a candidate ask me about the work environment, which was fine, but they then launched into a story about how they are in a terrible environment and are planning on suing their company. While I understand that candidates may have faced challenges in their previous roles or worked for companies that had toxic working environments, it is important that you do not disparage them.

In all honesty, the worst is when they do not have any questions at all. In my opinion, it shows that they are not really invested in the position or have not put enough thought into their decision to change jobs. Moving to a new company is not a decision that should be made lightly and it’s important for me as an employer to make sure I am hiring employees who are genuinely interesting in the work they will be doing.

The best questions that I’ve been asked typically demonstrate that they’re interested in the position and have a strong understanding of the work they would be doing if they were hired. My personal favorite question that I’ve been asked is if there are any hesitations or concerns that I may have based on the information they’ve provided that they can address on the spot. To me, this demonstrates that they care about the impression that they’ve made. I’ve asked this question in interviews and been able to clarify information that I did not properly explain when answering a question. It was really important to me that I was able to correct the misinformation as it may have stopped me from moving forward in the process!

Also, questions that demonstrate their knowledge base about the role in which they’re applying for is always a good sign. I particularly like when candidates reference items that I’ve touched on and weave them into a question.

A few other good questions:
• Asking about what it takes to succeed in the position
• Asking about what areas or issues may need to be addressed when first joining the company
• Asking about challenges that may be faced if you were to be hired
• Asking the employer what they enjoy most about the company
• I am also self-centered, so I always like when candidates ask about my background and how my current company compares to previous employers that I’ve worked for. Bonus points if they’ve actually looked me up on LinkedIn and reference specifics :)”

Think about the best and worst experiences you’ve had during an interview – and talk to others about the same topic – and see how that can help you with future interviews.

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Business News

How to stop reeking of desperation when you job hunt

(CAREER) Hunting for a job can come with infinite pressures and rejection, sometimes you just want it to be over – here’s how to avoid reeking of desperation.

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desperation when job hunting

Whether you were one of the millions of people who quit their job this year in The Great Resignation or you’ve been unemployed since the pandemic began, when you’re looking for work, it can feel hopeless after a while. Just like that student in class who raises their hand at every question, you don’t want to come across as desperate, “pick me, pick me!” Money might be tight. You want to be eager, but you don’t want to be so anxious that you sabotage your job search.

Right now, job seekers have the upper hand, but you want to show off your skills and professionalism, not your neediness.

5 ways you come across as overly desperate for a job:

  1. Applying for multiple positions at the same company. Employers want you to be a fit for a particular job. Instead, tell the hiring manager that you’re open to other positions that might be a good fit.
  2. Checking in with the hiring manager too much. Follow up after an interview, but don’t keep checking in. If they have news, they’ll share it.
  3. Talking about how much you need a job. Don’t bring up your personal issues in an interview. Stay focused on why you are the best person for the job.
  4. Being willing to accept any offer. You should negotiate and go to bat for yourself when you get an offer. Explain why you’re worth more money because you probably are.
  5. Forgetting to ask questions about the bigger picture. You don’t want to be so eager to impress that you don’t think about the company culture and perks. You might be desperate, but getting into a job that doesn’t fit your needs and personality won’t help your situation.

Desperation can make you appear to be in the clearance bin at the store. Sure, you may get something for a great price, but will you actually be able to fully use it when you get it home? As a job seeker, you want to be the premium brand on the shelf. Maybe not every buyer (employer) can appreciate you or even afford you, but when the right one comes along, it’s a good fit.

Employers want team members who will be assets for their company. Your job search needs to start with a strong resume and impressive cover letter. Instead of going for quantity, choose job openings for quality, where you can bring something to the table for the company.

Ask a Manager’s Alison Green has some great resources for getting a job, including a free guide to preparing for interviews. Practice interviewing. Make a great first impression. Know that there is a job out there for you.

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