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Use it or Lose it!

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Sometimes people surprise me.

I mean really surprise me. It happened today.

I’ve been having a conversation with Greg Swan over at Bloodhound Blog and I’m amazed at the misconceptions about the relationships of each of us to our local, state and national associations.

While there is a relationship between the local ,state , and national associations, there is no conspiracy among them to do anything.

Each local Association, and each State Association is comprised of individual volunteer members who choose the direction of their particular organization, and staff members who facilitate the decisions made by those volunteers. Every Association has different volunteer leadership and different staff. All of them operate in what they perceive to be the best interests of their Association. And all of them are different.

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Those members are the same people that Blog and comment and tweet. No one is disenfranchised, and I don’t know of any association on any level that doesn’t welcome members who wish to volunteer their time.

But it seems that to some people , these groups are not opportunities to influence or improve the the industry , they are punching bags. Places to vent your frustration over the market, or a problem you’re having with a software vendor. The post at BHB was about standard forms, and the current vendor used by the Arizona Association of REALTORS.

Each State Association has their own system for creating and disseminating forms, crafted by their members (that means any practitioners that were interested in the Standard Forms Process) and mandated by their members though their governance. In Pennsylvania, there is a choice of vendors, or you can buy pre-printed forms.

Before states got involved in creating these standard forms (which was during my time as a real estate professional), smaller real estate companies used forms printed by local legal forms printers (non real estate related entities that are probably still in business in some form) and larger real estate firms created their own real estate contracts. That option still exists. – If you have a problem with your state’s forms, don’t use them -hire an attorney to draw your own forms and publish them on any platform you wish.

Of course, there is the other consideration – that the State Associations have managed risk reduction for their members by creating these standard forms, and it is probably a good business practice to use the form in case you are sued some day, or need to defend an action that you took in completing the form. The trade-off is if you use the group’s products, the group (not any individual) gets to determine what the form says and how it is disseminated. But it is a reasonable trade off – the same trade off that takes place in any group effort.

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You are the Association

I always felt impacted by Eldridge Cleaver’s statement, “You’re either part of the solution or you’re part of the problem” There is no Monster in the Industry- neither NAR nor your State Association nor your local Association are out to harm you. Everyone of them is a group that you can contribute to and influence if you wished. They would probably welcome your efforts.

I believe that by not participating in the Association, you surrender your ability to make changes to the group. To me, the crucial issue is about participation. If you want to change things, be a participant in the change. If you are willing to let someone else drive, don’t complain about where the ride takes you.

Associations are driven by their members, and the direction chosen by those members is facilitated by their staff. But if you aren’t present at the meetings, if you don’t volunteer to create forms or choose vendors, then IMHO I think that you lose credibility when you complain about the direction of the organization.

And if you’re going to complain, even without being credible, can you at least get the facts right?

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Written By

Bill is an unusual blend of Old & New - The CEO Century 21 Advantage Gold (Philadelphia's Largest Century 21 company and BuzzBuilderz (a Social Media Marketing Company), He is a Ninja CEO, blending the Web 1 and 2.0 world together in a fashion that stretches the fabric of the universe. You can follow him on twitter @Billlublin or Facebook or LinkedIn.

35 Comments

35 Comments

  1. Mack in Atlanta

    July 8, 2008 at 6:27 pm

    “I believe that by not participating in the Association, you surrender your ability to make changes to the group. To me, the crucial issue is about participation. If you want to change things, be a participant in the change. If you are willing to let someone else drive, don’t complain about where the ride takes you.”

    This statement reminds me of the citizens that complain about their elected officials and didn’t bother to vote. With this election year I hope everyone exercises their right to vote!

  2. Matthew Rathbun

    July 8, 2008 at 6:36 pm

    Perception…. There doesn’t need to be a monster, you only need the fear of one to control people. Saying things should be done your way, is much easier than actually getting involved and working for that change.

    That being said, the Associations could do a better job of showing the members what they are doing. I’m not a fan of the Association sponsoring ancillary services, but with the hatred of members paying their dues we’re all looking for opportunities to find non-dues revenues to supplement the programs that all the members want and many need.

    The fact is that only a small portion of members take advantage of the resources out there. Everyone (no matter the service) wants the options dropped in their laps and don’t want to GO find and use the tools.

    As a staff member, even I find myself concentrating on those who are using the services and taking the classes…

    The Association really can do better, but the laborers are few and the true believers are quickly dwindling.

  3. Bill Lublin

    July 8, 2008 at 6:48 pm

    @Mack You are preaching to the choir.

    @Matthew – You’re right – Associations could do better, and many of them try, but without volunteers who want change its just tough as you know even better than I. But if you don;t want to cook , don’t complain about the meal.

  4. Jim Lee

    July 8, 2008 at 7:40 pm

    Yep, I agree about finding the laborers. We’ve had trouble in our association past years coming up with one candidate who wants to be president or a director for a year.

    And the numbers do get smaller every year.

  5. BawldGuy Talking

    July 8, 2008 at 7:54 pm

    Bill — Ideas are one thing. Execution of those ideas is another. Whether it’s NAR, CAR, or the local San Diego Board, I’ve not seen evidence of any consistent ability to get things done well. There are exceptions of course.

    But I’m not in real estate to be an administrator, or a computer specialist, or software writer, etc., etc. The various level associations should be populated by world class pros there only to execute our agenda. What we have now is embarrassing, and no level of my participation is gonna change it.

    If NAR raised it’s effectiveness two levels they’d still be looked upon as borderline incompetent. San Diego? They’re a bona fide joke. I haven’t had a need for them for the last several years. I don’t even ensure I’m current on dues, which as I speak I’m reminded I need to catch up. 🙂

    Though complicated, the MLS is surely not sophisticated, relatively speaking. Yet, instead of the incredibly powerful tool it could be, we muddle along with the Edsel they give us. Just ask Kris about the geniuses in charge of the local operation. They’d have to go up three levels to be Keystone Kops.

    Hire folks to do the jobs not meant for Realtors, and don’t allow Realtors to make hi-tech decisions involving policy without the benefit of world class advice.

    How hard could that be? Apparently nearly impossible in my experience.

  6. Jason Sandquist

    July 8, 2008 at 8:18 pm

    I thing I remember doing a few of those in the pictures. I don’t remember my team being so helpful.

  7. Brad Nix

    July 8, 2008 at 9:28 pm

    BIll,

    I love the line, “If you want to change things, be a participant in the change. If you are willing to let someone else drive, don’t complain about where the ride takes you.” But also agree with @Matt, associations can do better. In fact, I believe both of the statements enough that I have volunteered my time to make both happen for the past 4 years.

    I can tell you from being on the board at a local association, most of the decisions being made are reactionary and not visionary. Most of the volunteers and staff operate out of fear of change or absence of knowledge about the opportunities to improve. In Atlanta, we have a very unique system in that our local boards in Metro Atlanta do not provide MLS services. We have two public MLS options that operate without direct association influence. Even without running an MLS, I feel like our association can do better. Associations should be the ‘voice of real estate’ by leading the industry forward. It starts with getting the right people involved. I try to recruit forward thinkers to help our association, but it’s hard to find the volunteers.

  8. Frank Jewett

    July 8, 2008 at 9:59 pm

    There is no Monster in the Industry- neither NAR nor your State Association nor your local Association are out to harm you.

    Organized real estate relies on that sort of rubber stamp oversight, Bill, though to be fair, it’s not realistic to expect volunteer leadership to provide meaningful oversight nor would it be credible to claim that they do. Leadership relies on staff for information. The potential for abuse is obvious.

  9. Larry Yatkowsky

    July 8, 2008 at 10:03 pm

    Bill,

    Been on the association side of the fence for number of years amounting to almost a third of my time in the business. It’s a place where a lot of good things get done by hard working volunteers and support staff.

    Something that needs saying is that in our go-fast world moving big elephants is a problem for those who are new to the process by which associations operate. If you aspire to make a difference get on a committee. However, be prepared to see your one year mandate meld into the greater scheme. Elephants move slow and in order subdue them you have to take a bite at a time. Enough bites and you will if your mandate is worthy for all, succeed in seeing it come to be. I have seen high priority initiatives submitted 10 years prior now being implimented. Sounds rediculous but reflecting on the complexity of the intiative and it’s affect on aspects of our industry, government, and the consumer, the time frame does not seem unusual nor unreasonable. Moving too quickly without accounting for all stakeholders involved can give rise to untold longer term issues. It’s a lot of work but it’s also an astounding education.

    Like you Bill, I encourage members to give some time to your association. You will have a much greater appreciation for our industry and I think be a better realtor for it.

  10. BawldGuy Talking

    July 8, 2008 at 10:03 pm

    Frank — Your comment is right on point.

    Remember TV of yesteryear with the Mickey Mouse Club? That’s most boards.

  11. Frank Jewett

    July 8, 2008 at 10:22 pm

    But I’m not in real estate to be an administrator, or a computer specialist, or software writer, etc., etc. The various level associations should be populated by world class pros there only to execute our agenda. What we have now is embarrassing, and no level of my participation is gonna change it.

    I hope Bill respects you enough to set aside his ego as a participant, because you’ve really covered most of the problems with organized real estate in this paragraph. Bill seems to see the criticism as an affront to himself and the leadership, but it’s really a comment on the results of the entire system.

  12. BawldGuy Talking

    July 8, 2008 at 10:39 pm

    Frank — Much appreciated.

    Bill and I know exactly where each other stand on this issue. That’s how we met in the first place. I have the utmost respect for him, and he’s shown me the same. He’s always struck me as the consummate pro, and like me in many ways, Old School to the max. 🙂

    In fact, we’ll be meeting in person for the first time later this month at BarCamp in SF. Or at least I hope so. I’m not staying for the conference.

  13. Frank Jewett

    July 8, 2008 at 10:52 pm

    AOR leadership needs two tools: independent auditing and the courage to hold staff accountable. If you can’t measure performance objectively and you don’t have the stomach to fire people even when you know they are screw ups, you can’t really expect good results.

    One example would be C.A.R.’s new website. You don’t have to understand server side technology to recognize that C.A.R.’s new website crashing and burning on day one (weeks later they are still trying to pick up the pieces) was an abysmal failure of execution, but if you aren’t going to hold anyone accountable then that failure is not a surprising result.

    BarCamp in SF? I might be interested in taking the Jonathan Dalton approach to the conference.

  14. Matthew Rathbun

    July 9, 2008 at 1:40 am

    Do you know why the Realtor Association is screwed up? It involves people…

    I hear these sweeping statements about how useless the Realtor Associations are and I can’t help but laugh. Just because your’s sucks, doesn’t mean that inherently they all do. I agree that NAR has some evolutions to go through, and if they don’t – folks will eventually find alternatives. But being creatures of habit there will be another Realtor-type entity that will exist and within time it will be just as equally screwed up – because it involves people.

    What none of you are getting is the even our blessed blogging / social media world is turning into what most of you don’t like. Those who running blogs of any size are finding that there are potential money making opportunities and that it’s almost necessary to cover the cost of all the work that is involved.

    We’re in the early stages of the politics of running a blog, picking sides in issues, needing small groups to work on specific types of topics, finding people with given skillsets to author certain things and generally be a service…. This is how the Realtor Association got started.

    Nature has a habit of filling a void. Trade Associations will always be around. I have experiences in civic groups, Volunteer EMS groups and Religious organizations – in each of those cases I hear the EXACT same whining as I hear on the blogs. There is always a group of folks who do not like “the system” and are (regardless of if they would label themselves as such) non-conformist who hate the “necessary evil” of the governing body and the related politics.

    I know a little of Bill’s perspective, having spoken to him and frankly he’s been in the buisness longer and has a more robust history than any of the people I hear ranting against the association. Frankly no one who disagrees with him or I, or Frank or that “Bawld Guy” 😉 has any right to disrespect another perception. It’s based on our experiences.

    I try to put in the category that your life experience says that being a Realtor sucks. However, I watch as the Virginia Association and my local Association are KILLING themselves both as volunteers and staff to get the services out there that agents needs and in many cases before they know that they need them. Only to watch about 20% use the training, the tool kits, the free marketing, the legal resources, technology options etc…

    I say again, what I’ve said before – members want and demand a number of things that they aren’t willing to pay for and then get ticked when it’s necessary for the Association to offer ancillary services (such as forms, book stores, lockbox systems etc…) to help offset the cost of the services and try to keep dues low. I HATE that NAR has anything to do with that screwed up Realtor.com, SentraLock, MLS’ etc… They should be service oriented for education, business support and lobbying for what’s best of it’s members and property owner rights. However, it can’t be that way and provide services without the income to do so and members don’t want to pay for it.

    Most members complain about the cost of the dues because they are too lazy to use the services that are available… however they’ll happily spend countless hundreds and even thousands of dollars on newspaper ads that every marketing report in the world says will result in virtually no direct sales. How ya like them apples!?!?!

    I like that Frank referred to it as “organized real estate”, I find it interesting because I’ve heard that phrase applied to “organized religion” as a church leader when members were complaining about whatever they complain about. None of this is new – it’s just that people have blogs to be heard more than they used to. when they yelled at whatever it is they yell at.

    Here’s what I never hear in any of the tirade against the Realtor Association – how do YOU think the system should be fixed? Bawld Guy said that his involvement will do nothing to fix the system…. Ok, let’s follow that logic and stay home on election day in the future (honestly America’s political system is even WAY more screwed up than NAR, so maybe that’s not the best analogy…) Dissolution of the Association is certainly a valid consideration – but then someone else will start up some other type of screwed up group and we’ll all be talking about that group in the future. It’s human nature….

  15. Matthew Rathbun

    July 9, 2008 at 1:41 am

    Holy Hanna! That was a whole blog post in and of itself! This what happens when I can’t sleep at 3 am and decide to go read blogs…. sorry.

  16. Bill Lublin

    July 9, 2008 at 3:02 am

    @Bawldguy “Ideas are one thing. Execution of those ideas is another. ” Amen to that – I just see the smart people out here and know they can improve things (Call me a dreamer)

    “Hire folks to do the jobs not meant for Realtors, and don’t allow Realtors to make hi-tech decisions involving policy without the benefit of world class advice. ” You are so on the money with this. I can’t imagine how much better your Association would be with you sitting there kickin’ butt when people get silly, and keeping them on track to help the members. Like I said One can only dream 😉

  17. Bill Lublin

    July 9, 2008 at 3:03 am

    @Brad; With people like you that have intelligence, drive and vision, you will make the board better. Sometimes I think its like working out or going on a diet. Each day doesn’t seem to accomplish much but after a period of time, there are improvements that are substantial

  18. Bill Lublin

    July 9, 2008 at 3:12 am

    @Frank; I really don;t see any commnets as affronts to myself or leadership – I just get frsutrated when there are inaccuracies, and I rush to try to correct them

    Bawldguy’s points are absolutely valid. But one of the things that we need to remember is that all of the Associations we talk about are different. They have different volunteers, different staff, different challenges, and they meet them with different levels of inventiveness and competency.

    My point was, and is, that participation by people like you and Bawldguy, and Brad , and Matthew and all of the other bright and professional people we meet here can only improve it one piece at a time. Staff needs to be accountable, hold them accountable. I have had the privilege of working with some great staff people – and some who were not as stellar – they’re people, just like us, and they perform their jobs at differing levels,

    I don’t think that the Associations are perfect, but I do think they get bad rapped and are targets of opportunity. I think that the more members know about them, and the more involved they are in them, the better the Association is and the fewer misconceptions we all have.

    Larry Yatkowsky says it so articulately “Elephants move slow and in order subdue them you have to take a bite at a time. Enough bites and you will if your mandate is worthy for all, succeed in seeing it come to be.” Now that’s what I’m talkin’ about!

  19. Bill Lublin

    July 9, 2008 at 3:18 am

    @Matthew – I read that stuff and I want to move to Virginia – there’s staff talking and to go to my earlier point there’s an exceptional staff person with a REALTOR background – and to that I would add people like Cliff Niersbach and Kevin Milligan, and Rodney Ganshoe, and Mike Thiel and Luarie Janick and Mark Lesswing and Kevin Garner at NAR and lots more people at PAR and GPAR, but I’m sure there are also Staff people who don’t do their jobs as well – just like there are bad REALTORS, good REALTORS, and great REALTORS – but that’s why we need to take some responsibility for OUR Association

    Now Matthew get some sleep or you’ll be grumpy all day tomorrow 😉

    Oh, and Bawldguy – I will be in SF on the 22nd – I think we land around 10 or 11 so we’ll be at REBar together – I’m really looking forward to an F2F meet up – the ice cream is on me!

  20. Frank Jewett

    July 9, 2008 at 4:16 am

    Matthew, I picked up the expression “organized real estate” from a successful broker and past president of the local board. I don’t think he meant it in a loaded fashion. He simply used it to describe the various levels of the AOR heirarchy.

    Bill, I write a monthly column for the local AOR and teach classes there as well, so I am trying to make a positive contribution. I think my experiences inside the AOR system would surprise you, but in the end you’d probably say “It can’t happen here.” I hope you’re right.

  21. Dru Bloomfield

    July 9, 2008 at 6:20 am

    Frustration is what creates opportunities, and solutions. Associations have room for improvement. We are the association. Either we help, hinder, or ignore.

    When I think about trying to run a real estate business without the association, I am overwhelmed. The basis for cooperation that many of us take for granted. How to find and compare as many homes as possible for my client. The relative ease of being able to use a common lock box system to show homes. Having a common contract and addendums that has been tuned to the current market.

    I believe we always have room for improvement. Just as a child (or any individual) does not blossom by being berated, ideas and solutions need an open mind, helpful hands, and a willingness to make a few sacrifices for something better.

    Disclaimer: Yes, I’m an active volunteer in my local association.

  22. Brad Nix

    July 9, 2008 at 6:36 am

    It’s promising to read how many of us are involved in our local associations. The next step is for us to take leadership positions. We can only do so much as committee members, but have more opportunities as directors and presidents. Perhaps this is just the beginning of the slow change? I encourage each of you to recruit others like yourselves and to push for changes by working your way up the ranks. As 2nd VP this year, I am now in line to become president in 2011 (man, the chain of succession is long). But I am committed to making a difference.

  23. Jennifer in Louisville

    July 9, 2008 at 6:48 am

    “You’re either part of the solution or you’re part of the problem”

    Right on IMO. Are there problems? Sure. But what are YOU doing about them?

    And presentation matters. We’re all supposed to be marketers and skilled in calmly presenting information in a logical fashion to ultimately get persons to do what we want. Use some of that skill when presenting your concerns/recommendations and you are likely to see a much better situation for everyone involved.

  24. Bill Lublin

    July 9, 2008 at 7:47 am

    @Brad Congratulations – its worth the wait – And I’m sure you’ll be stellar. This is the evolution of our Associations. From a group of old white guys at formal dinners, to our current diversity, its been an interesting Century of change with lots more to come.

    @Jennifer – You put in a wonderfully ariculate manner, the heart of the issue – we’re agnets of change for our customers and we can be agents of change for our associations as well.

  25. Ken Smith

    July 9, 2008 at 8:14 am

    Have to agree that if you aren’t willing to step up and participate in your board you can’t complain about their actions. There are things our board does that I don’t 100% agree with, then I talk to a friend of mine at the board and she explains the reason behind it (many times to help members avoid getting sued) and afterwards I typically at least understand. Now if I was involved then maybe I could have offered solutions that IMO would have been better, but I’m not so how can I complain

  26. Candy Lynn

    July 9, 2008 at 9:55 am

    “You are the Association”
    May I use that as a slogan for member involvement campaign in our local association? It says it all!

    Timely post as the VP & I met yesterday for an mid-year review & planning session for our local association.Our big topics were member involvement or rather lack of it, how do we motive members especially in this market to participate and also how to deal with members that will not participate but are critical of the association.

  27. Glenn fm Naples

    July 9, 2008 at 10:26 am

    Bill – this saying from your post says it all “You’re either part of the solution or you’re part of the problem”. Or in other words – don’t complain if you don’t have a solution.

    Maybe greater participation in local, state, and national organizations would prove helpful to the complainers to learn more about their profession – but why expend the energy to learn – they are already smarter than the participants.

    Personal experience – my participation in the local board has enlightened me and assisted in my growth as a professional.

  28. Jonathan Dalton

    July 9, 2008 at 10:52 am

    I have an approach named after me?

    What I usually ask of NAR and my board is to stay out of the way. Don’t make my life harder (read: Yun, Lawrence and Lereah, David) and I’m happy. There’s much that goes on behind the scenes which is appreciated and much more that can be done (read: Insurance, Health).

    Rather than being either part of the solution or part of the problem, I think of it this way … don’t come to me with a complaint. Come to me with a solution. Amazing how often those upset with how things run don’t have any alternative in mind.

  29. Teri Lussier

    July 9, 2008 at 11:04 pm

    I think you are missing one very important point for me: In order to do my job properly and to the best of my ability, my membership is mandatory, not voluntary. This makes my relationship to my board completely different from, to borrow from Matthew “civic groups, Volunteer EMS groups and Religious organizations”- those are all volunteer.

    Can you see the difference?

    >There is no Monster in the Industry- neither NAR nor your State Association nor your local Association are out to harm you.

    If you really consider it: Forced participation is kinda monstrous.

    >But if you aren’t present at the meetings, if you don’t volunteer to create forms or choose vendors, then IMHO I think that you lose credibility when you complain about the direction of the organization.

    I already am a member so I get a voice, right? Are you suggesting that I can only implement change if I volunteer? Or should only be allowed to suggest change if I volunteer at meetings? If I blog about changes I want to see, or work to free myself from mandatory membership, is that not volunteer work toward change?

    When organizations have trouble getting participants, it’s likely that they’ve outgrown their usefulness. Instead of telling members what they should do, learn to listen- we are voting with participation, or lack thereof. We are telling Boards what we want, they simply refuse to listen.

  30. BawldGuy Talking

    July 9, 2008 at 11:11 pm

    Thanks Teri, I was gettin’ weary of being the Lone Ranger. They force you to join, then it’s your fault because they can’t get out of their own way.

  31. Matthew Rathbun

    July 10, 2008 at 4:47 am

    The only people who are “forced” to join are those working for Broker’s who decided to join. I don’t know of one state that says – “Here’s your real estate license, but you can only list and sell if you’re a REALTOR”. If your broker is a member, than you beef is with him for making you join. Go become a broker and go at it, without joining. There’s your “freedom.”

    If you can do better, do it. I am suggesting that you can only invoke change with involvement. That involvement maybe no more than voting for your Board of Directors, but that is involvement non-the-less.

    Absolutely not, is blogging a “work toward change.” I am so tired of everyone in RE.net taking themselves so freaking seriously. Last night I shut off my computer in frustration because comments were being made against Russell’s humorous post. The fact that any of us can wright down an opinion or be angry about something doesn’t make us superheros… It makes us people.

    Dr. Martin Luther King would not have had the impact of 1966 had he merely written a bunch of crap on blogs, in 500 words or less, because he knew that his target readership had the attention span of a nat. He sat in dark cell with a smuggled in ink pen and newspaper, wrote out the Birmingham doctrine and then went and followed through with a specific planned action and involvement. His battle was against oppression. Hatred is a monster – not an organization who is providing services for your business.

    I could (and many have) written at length the value of being a Realtor, I’ve also written of the systems failings. Because ALL systems and theory’s have a failing somewhere along the line.

    However no one is going to convince the non-supporters; because that group sees shadows and monsters under the bed and feel a sense of intellectual superiority over those who are benefiting from their membership. My three year old once saw monsters under the bed, then she turned four and felt silly knowing that they don’t exist.

    God Himself, didn’t just write ten old commandments on some rocks and then say, “OK folks, I’ve put my thoughts down and now the world is a better place..”

    Personally I am not a big fan of the political system in America. But, if I don’t like it, I can move out of the country. is there a better country? No, not in my opinion, so I get involved with my church and civic groups to try and improve my little piece of it.

  32. Teri L

    July 10, 2008 at 6:07 am

    Matthew-

    I’m very sorry that the internet has been a source of frustration for you lately. It was not my intent to add to that.

    If it helps you at all, I am a world class volunteer and agree with you about making our little corners better. To me, this issue is not the same.

    My purpose in commenting was to simply try to explain my point of view, so that we might reach greater understanding.

    Sorry BawldGuy, Tonto is riding off into the sunset. 😉

  33. Frank Jewett

    July 10, 2008 at 11:38 am

    If you can do better, do it. I am suggesting that you can only invoke change with involvement. That involvement maybe no more than voting for your Board of Directors, but that is involvement non-the-less.

    Matthew, do Realtors in your area actually have a choice of candidates? How does rubber stamping a slate of candidates chosen in a backroom by the existing power structure change anything?

  34. Frank Jewett

    July 10, 2008 at 1:30 pm

    AOR leadership could get some much needed perspective from the following post, but I suspect most would dismiss it out of hand because it interferes with their fantasy of helping to create a Realtor nirvana.

    “What is not new, alas, are the monopolies of morons imposed upon us by the National Association of Realtors and all of its many tentacular sub-cartels. Where everything in business is about to change radically — in response to the iPhone, to Web 3.0, to the unforeseeable efficiencies of the cloud — everything in our business will change at its usual glacial pace — driven not by the pursuit of profit, not by the thrill of innovation, not by the ever-more-vast oceans of information available to us — driven only by the need of the NAR and its cabal of sleazy vendors to hold Realtors hostage.” – Greg Swann, BloodHoundBlog

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