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The region of the USA that’s about to boom (look out, Silicon Valley)

(ENTREPRENEUR NEWS) Who needs the Silicon Valley when this place is fast-becoming a startup mecca?

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Good ol’ amber waves of grain

Who needs the Silicon Valley when the Midwest is fast-becoming a start-up mecca?

There really IS no better time that than now to cultivate your startup dreams! And lest you think that means picking up and moving (to the Silicon Valley or Austin, Texas or anywhere else identified as the Promised Land) when in reality you are living in Ohio, then think again! There is plenty of evidence supporting that the Midwest is distinguishing itself as a new startup land-of-opportunity.

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The place to be

Venturebeat, which knows a thing or two about startups and why they are successful, points out in a recent article that “there are more entrepreneurs building billion-dollar companies in the Midwest today than in the past 50 years combined.” I don’t feel that is a coincidence. In fact, says VB:

“It is only a matter of time until Midwest cities surpass recent emerging venture cities like Shanghai, Stockholm, and Mumbai to rival Silicon Valley.”

What’s more, rather than being the “next big thing” (a worn out phrase if ever there was one), the startup market in the Midwest is happening now. Experts feel the number of new startups keeps doubling: 1,800 companies two years ago. Nearly 4,000 this year. And that’s just in Ohio. It’s no understatement to say there are plenty of investment opportunities in the Midwest, and they are on par with those found in other geographies.

The hook

Whoever coined the term “Silicon Prairie” should get cappuccinos for life. That is, if you can find one in Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas or any other Midwestern city looking to reinvent itself as the new Silicon Valley. According to recent article in The Hustle, “scores of techies are flocking to cities like Lincoln, Des Moines, and Kansas City in hopes of increasing their company’s chance of survival.” So what is it that is pulling entrepreneurs off the West coast and transplanting them to the  Midwest? Is it something in the water? The standard-of-living? The people? Probably a combination of all three. Plus that unknown variable often referred to as the “X factor.”

Consider: the 2015 median home price in San Francisco [the current tech mecca] was about $1.1 million. That means, I don’t know, about $200,000 down and maybe a monthly mortgage of $4,000 a month. Hustle compares that to Lincoln, NE, where the median home was just $158,000. I know what you’re thinking, “Yeah but it’s LINCOLN, Nebraska.” OK, granted but I also know that these days most entrepreneurs need only a laptop and an internet connection to make waves and hit upon something big. Anything else you feel you need access to is relative.

Look and you shall find

I mentioned earlier called the “X-Factor.” For every entrepreneur it is something different. The thing that elevates your company (or even yourself) from one level to the next. Maybe for you the X-Factor won’t be in Lincoln, Nebraska but it might be in Columbus, Ohio. What is certain is that a company can access, build, and deploy world-class technology from anywhere.

Call me silly, but if you’re an entrepreneur with a fledgling company in 2016, you’re overlooking a huge caveat if you don’t consider building it in the Midwest!

#MidwestBoom

Nearly three decades living and working all over the world as a radio and television broadcast journalist in the United States Air Force, Staff Writer, Gary Picariello is now retired from the military and is focused on his writing career.

Business Entrepreneur

How to know when it’s time to go freelance full time

(ENTREPRENEUR) There may come a point when traditional work becomes burdensome. Know how to spot when it is time to go full freelance.

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Freelancing is often thought of as a mythical concept, something that is almost too good to be true. While it isn’t all about hanging out at home in your pajamas all day, being a freelance is something that is completely possible to be successful – assuming you do your homework.

Recently, a friend of mine who is a licensed esthetician was no longer happy with her position at the salon and spa she worked for. The set hours were becoming a burden, as was having to divvy up appointments between another esthetician within the salon.

She noticed an increasing number of people asking her if she could perform services (eyebrow and lip waxing) from her home, as they preferred not to go into the hectic salon. My friend also found an increase in requests for her to travel to bridal parties for their makeup, rather than the parties coming into the salon.

It was around this time that my friend began to seriously consider becoming a freelance esthetician, rather than a salon employee. After about six months of research and consideration, she decided that this was the best route for her.

Below are the reasons she felt ready to pursue this option, and if they resonate with you, you may be ready for a full time freelance career.

1. She had a number of built-in clients and a list of people she could contact to announce her at-home services. Doing this at the start of one’s career would be very difficult without a contact list and word-of-mouth references, so it’s important to have…

2. …experience! My friend had worked for a number of salons over the years, and had the experience of working with all different types of clients. She also learned what she liked and didn’t like about each salon, which were pieces that factored into her own work-from-home space.

3. Since she had years of experience and had done all of the necessary aforementioned research, she knew what was expected of her and knew that getting a freelance career off the ground wouldn’t be a walk in the park. Operating a freelance career is completely on you, so you have to be 100 percent dedicated to making it work – it won’t just happen for you.

4. Once she began thinking about this idea nonstop and became more excited, she knew it was time to move forward. At first, the “what ifs” were daunting, but became more positive as time went on. If the idea of being a freelancer elicits more smiles than frowns, definitely take the time to consider this option.

5. In addition to the clients she already had, she also had an amazing support system who helped her develop her freelance brand and get her at-home business up and running. Having a solid group of people in your life that will help you is crucial, and any offer for help should be appreciated.

Other things to consider are: do you have enough money saved in case the freelance venture takes longer than planned to take off? If not, maybe stick with the day job until you feel more financially secure.

Jumping into something too quickly can cause you to become overwhelmed and drown in the stress. Make sure you’ve covered every single base before making this leap. Good luck, freelancers!

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Business Entrepreneur

Entrepreneurs’ edge – working quality, not quantity hours

(ENTREPRENEURS) A huge advantage of the entrepreneur life is full control over your day – and using your hours wisely (and creatively) boosts productivity, even if it means sleeping in and staying up late. Think quality, not quantity.

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So often, we hear the phrase “quality, not quantity,” which can be appropriately used to describe ideas we give to our boss or the amount of effort we put into volunteering. The long and short of it is – don’t half-ass something because you think it’s fulfilling the need of “quantity.”

Quality is always so much more important when it comes to output in your job. Like, okay, great, you worked 11 gillion hours this month, but what did you actually accomplish? Did you finish endless busy work and take pictures for social media of how busy you are? Or did you grow your bottom line?

Over the years, we’ve heard a lot about flex hours and more working from home options, but a hot new idea is (you guessed it) quality hours, not quantity hours. Sometimes fitting into that 9-to-5 framework is satisfying the quantity aspect, but are we really being as productive as we should?

Many people argue that we should be working less in order to produce more. Wait, don’t leave, let me explain.

Does it really seem like the best idea to be working when your energy level is in the negatives? Probably not. This opens the door for more mistakes, less engaged work, and less output. If you’re a night owl and your brain fires on all cylinders when the sun has gone down, is it really worth focusing your work energy during the hours that your brain isn’t fully on?

If we work only when we know we’re going to be productive, we can really make the most of our time. Now, don’t get that confused with “sit around and wait for lightning to strike and THEN work,” it means schedule your tasks based on when your mind is typically the most productive.

When are you most productive? In the morning after you’ve had a quick job and some coffee? Or post mid-afternoon when you’re full-on awake? Jonas Downey pondered this question, and said, “I’m usually at my creative peak in the mid-morning and lose steam after lunch, so I shuffle my work accordingly. I do exploratory freeform stuff in the morning, and I save routine tasks (like implementing something I already know how to do) for the afternoon. I also have a rather short attention span, so I take tiny breaks a lot.”

He notes that working just to hit a certain number of hours is counterproductive, because in that time, there are likely to be hours worked when you are not at your best. Click To Tweet

Be honest – do you do your best work when your head is in the clouds, or when you show up to a task, raring to go?

Glorification of the 80 hour work week is dead in most circle, so consider scheduling yourself for times and days that your brain will cooperate with you instead of work against you and force you into menial work that feels like you’re accomplishing tasks!

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Business Entrepreneur

Is this normal (you wonder about your business)?

(ENTREPRENEURIALISM) It can be lonely not being able to openly ask potentially embarrassing questions about your business – there’s a way to do it anonymously…

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Entrepreneurialism is wildly rewarding – you are fully in control of the direction of your company, and you’re solving the world’s problems. But it’s also isolating when you’re not sure if what you’re experiencing is normal.

Sure, there’s Google, news networks (like ours), and professional connections to help you navigate, but sometimes you just want to know if something simple you’re seeing is normal.

Is Instagram Stories really where it’s at? Probably not if you’re a consultant.

Is it normal for an employee to attempt to re-negotiate their salary on their first day? Nope, but how do you keep the desirable employee without being bullied into new terms?

Do all entrepreneurs spend their first year in business as exhausted as a new parent? Sometimes.

You have questions, and together, we can share our experiences.

We have a brand new Facebook Group that is already wildly engaging, active, and you’d be amazed at how selflessly helpful people are – and we invite you to be one of them.

Want to anonymously ask a question about something you’re unsure is normal or not?

Click here to submit your question, and we’ll select as many as possible to discuss in the Facebook Group!

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