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Cool hypothetical investment tool we’re in love with

If you had invested $5,000 in Apple on January 1, 1998, it would be worth approximately $855,133 today. I know this thanks to website, New Investor Daily, that tells you what a hypothetical investment in the past would be worth today. And makes us regret lost of missed opportunities.

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hypothetical investment tool

Your alternate timeline

Do you ever wonder how much that stock you could have invested in years ago is worth today? Perhaps that Apple stock you thought of investing in around say, 1998, before Apple came out with colorful Macs, iPhones, and became the powerhouse it is today.

If you had invested $5,000 in Apple on January 1, 1998, it would be worth approximately $855,133 today. I know this thanks to website, New Investor Daily, that tells you what a hypothetical investment in the past would be worth today.

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A simple idea

At first glance, the site is very unassuming. With a simple design, the site only has a bit of text and an area for you to calculate the hypothetical investment. That’s pretty much it. Upon visiting the homepage, you’re directed to click on highlighted sections select a company, amount invested, and the date invested.

The highlighted sections are contained within the phrase, “If I had invested $______ in _________ on _________. What would it be worth today?” Once you fill in the blanks with your hypothetical investment, you click a find out button which leads you to the calculated answer. So for my 1998 Apple investment of $5,000, the site returned the answer of $855,133.

new-investor-daily

“Not to be used for making real investment decisions”

Along with the estimated worth of your hypothetical investment, the site also gives you information regarding the percent gain, price purchased and price sold, as well as chart illustrating the growth over time.

As the F.A.Q. section states, this site should not be used for making real investment decisions. According to the site, it is “just an interesting way to look at historic stock prices and it should not be used to make any kind of decision about anything.” However, it does give some recommendations on what to read for more information about investing. The site’s author even has a newsletter you can sign up for to help you learn about investing. The F.A.Q. section of the website also provides some great answers to investing questions.

Explore your hypothetical past

So check the site out, maybe wallow in a little bit of regret about that investment you didn’t make years ago, or be motivated to take action in investing today. I know after I played around with the tool, I felt more motivated to invest more seriously. While there’s no real way to tell how much you’ll make from investing, it might be something you want to explore.

#NewInvestorDaily

Nichole earned a Master's in Sociology from Texas State University and has publications in peer-reviewed journals. She has spent her career in tech and advertising. Her writing interests include the intersection of tech and society. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Communication and Media Studies at Murdoch University.

Business Finance

Credit card companies crap on cryptocurrencies

(FINANCE NEWS) Credit card companies are now trying to make customers slow their roll when purchasing crypto – and it’s kind of shady.

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Visa and Mastercard and now making it more difficult for their customers to purchase cryptocurrency by slapping additional fees on transactions. This month, Bitcoin investors using Coinbase noticed additional fees on bank statements and were like, wait what?

Turns out, the credit card companies decided to reclassify cryptocurrency transaction type from “purchase” to “cash advance.”

Coinbase confirmed the change in an email to its customers, noting “the MCC code for digital currency purchases was changed by a number of the major credit card networks.”

A Mastercard spokesperson claimed the change “provides a consistent view of such purchases for both merchants and issuers.”

This means an additional five percent fee is slapped on to every transaction from the credit card company in addition to the four percent credit card processing fee Coinbase already passes on to its users.

Right now, if you want to buy Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies instantly, your only option is using a credit or debit card. Transferring funds from your bank can take days, and since crypto prices can change in an instant, this isn’t a great option. Although there are lower fees for transferring funds via ACH, investors may get stung by fluctuating prices.

So basically, you’re going to use a credit or debit card for efficiency, but Visa and Mastercard want to make this harder on you. Unlike purchases, transactions labeled as “cash advances” don’t fall under an interest-free grace period. As soon as the purchase goes through, it accrues and compounds daily, so that’s pretty neat.

In addition to the new fee, cash advances carry higher interest rates as well.

Adding insult to injury, using a card for crypto purchases does not earn credit card points.

The card companies are equivocating bitcoin to withdrawing money from an ATM. This conflicts with the IRS’s stance that bitcoin is not currency, but rather taxable property.

Until everyone gets their stories straight, investors get stuck in the middle with more barriers to purchasing crypto, and conflicting regulation and processes.

And for Visa and Mastercard, that’s kind of the point. Their aim is to slow the rush of investment, even at the risk of losing potential millions in additional revenue. Assuming Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency don’t total crash and burn, eventually financial middlemen like credit card companies will be cut out of the picture.

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Business Finance

Don’t mess with Texas – especially when it comes to crypto

(FINANCE NEWS) The State of Texas is cracking down on crypto companies, and this won’t be the last cease and desist issued.

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After a one month undercover sting of crypto-currency startup DavorCoin, the Texas State Securities Board (TSSB) issued another cease-and-desist letter, ordering the cryptocurrency company to stop all operations in the state immediately; this is the state’s fourth emergency cease-and-desist in just one month regulating cryptocurrency companies.

Jason Rotunda, director of enforcement division at the TSSB told CNBC, “We confirmed our suspicion that they were being marketed toward retirees. [DavorCoin] was not disclosing the information that needs to be disclosed to an investor.”

Other cryptocurrencies being issued cease-and-desists include companies r2b coin, BitConnect, and USI-Tech Limited. All of these companies either were promising implausible or impossible returns on investment, low risk investments coming from Bitcoin mining–without the evidence to back it up, or not disclosing information required by state law.

After the TSSB pulled the plug on BitConnect, they started their investigation of DavorCoin for promising extremely similar ROI. DavorCoin also has another strike against it, a potentially more serious one: Investment fraud. DavorCoin, according to CoinDesk, has “intentionally hidden material information of its business–including its principles and business location, as well as how it plans to realize investment promises for investors.”

The lack of transparency on not just the basic information regarding the business itself, but also an investor disbursement plan violates sections of the Texas Securities Act.

Texas currently is leading the way regarding the regulation of cryptocurrenty investment opportunities, in which other states as well as the federal government are following suit. Other states filing formal complaints against cryptocurrency companies include Florida, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and Kansas.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, is taking note of the heightened amount of activity surrounding cryptocurrencies as well. Rotunda, also in his role as the vice chair of North American Securities Administrators Association, is trying to encourage regulatory agencies to adapt to this new way of doing business and investing.

“In both of those roles we’ve been monitoring cryptocurrencies quite a bit,” said Rotunda. “I think what we’re doing right now is we’re adapting to a new way of selling securities.”

The old adage is, after all, “don’t mess with Texas.” Especially when it comes to potentially defrauding investors through cryptocurrencies — but that’s kind of a mouthful.

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Business Finance

Fake crypto scam sends ransomware, then malware once you pay

(FINANCE) Buying unheard of ICOs just got much riskier as scammers find new ways to scam people out of their crypto investments while stealing their identities. Great.

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Cryptocurrency is hot right now. And while cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin are supposedly more secure than regular currency, that doesn’t mean that hackers aren’t looking for ways to take advantage of the trend.

A newly discovered ransomware scam banks on people’s desire to get rich quick by buying cryptocurrencies. The scam advertises a new cryptocurrency called SpriteCoin.

SpriteCoin isn’t a real currency; it’s just a ruse to get people to install ransomware. Often, SpriteCoin ads appear on forums where people learn about and discuss other cryptocurrencies, making SpriteCoin seem like the real deal (hence why social media sites are opting to nix all ads about cyrpto).

The ransomware is disguised as a wallet containing SpriteCoin. While your computer appears to be downloading the blockchain for your SpriteCoin, it is actually encrypting all of your files, while also raiding Chrome and Firefox for your stored passwords. Next, you receive a ransom note demanding that you pay up in order to get a decryption key, or else your files will be locked forever.

The ransom note demands payment in Monero, a cryptocurrency, to the tune of about $100. The note claims that “only we can decrypt your files. Don’t worry, we’ll give you your files back if you pay.”

To add insult to injury, once the Monero ransom has been paid, the hackers install additional malware that harvests personal data and gives hackers the power activate your webcam.

This ransomware scam was discovered by cyber security company Fortinet. Fortinet’s experts think that this scam, which is demanding a (relatively) inexpensive ransom, could be a pilot program for hackers to test out new delivery mechanisms for ransomware and malware. They want to see how many people will fall for the scam before scaling up.

Fortinet also explains that Monero is becoming the new cryptocurrency of choice amongst thieves using ransomware, because Bitcoin transaction fees have gone up and there is typically a delay on payments.

Cryptocurrencies could be a good investment – but make sure you do your research and only buy legit cryptocurrencies, lest you fall victim to such a vicious and repetitive scam.

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