Connect with us

Business Finance

NerdWallet: business credit card comparisons, reviews

Finding the right business credit card for your professional life is easy, thanks to NerdWallet’s dedication to providing easy-to-understand and comprehensive overviews of each available card.

Published

on

Choosing a credit card for your business

No matter how long you’ve owned and run your own business, you’ll eventually need to get a business credit card or two. It’s a natural step in the process, and an exciting one at that. But the sheer number of choices you have when it comes to credit cards can become instantly overwhelming and stressful, not to mention that looking up each card will be incredibly time-consuming. Instead of manually comparing hundreds of available cards, let NerdWallet do the work for you.

NerdWallet collects data on thousands of credit cards and creates relevant and useful comparisons for you. NerdWallet even compares multiple features at once, including card reward programs, interest rates, balance transfer and annual fees, and even how to earn the most airline miles for everyday business purchases.

It’s easy to get started; just fill out a simple, short questionnaire about what you need in a business credit card, and NerdWallet will provide you with pages and pages of applicable cards. For each card that is listed, you can choose which ones are worth your time to explore further by viewing the offer details, all without leaving your page of results.

Reviews and comments about credit cards

One feature that makes NerdWallet’s services unique is that other business professionals can leave reviews and comments about each credit card. Often, an involved conversation begins between NerdWallet users, so you’re sure to get real stories from real professionals. Sorting through the offer details and the user reviews can give you a clearer insight into what you’re looking for in a business credit card, and you don’t even have to do any of the legwork.

NerdWallet’s blog actually lists and details the four best corporate rewards cards for biz pros. The card currently ranked as number one is the Chase Ink Card. Here is an example of the type of researched reviews you’ll receive from NerdWallet:
[ba-quote]“The Ink by Chase has a lot to offer, from a crazy-high signup bonus to ongoing rewards to a full year of no interest. For starters, the signing bonus is worth $250. The ink charges no annual fee and earns rewards in 5% bonus categories….You will qualify for the $250 signing bonus when you spend $5k within the first 3 months. Additionally, they grant a 0% APR for 12 months, ideal if you need to make some purchases that will take a little time to pay down. If you don’t like fees, don’t like interest, but DO like rewards, the Chase Ink is an affordable and highly rewarding option for entrepreneurs.”[/ba-quote]

Finding the right business credit card for your professional life is easy, thanks to NerdWallet’s dedication to providing easy-to-understand and comprehensive overviews of each available card. Simply compare the cards that fit your specifications, apply right on the website, and get back to work. There’s no need to spend hours researching on your own because that work has already been done by NerdWallet.

The American Genius Staff Writer: Charlene Jimenez earned her Master's Degree in Arts and Culture with a Creative Writing concentration from the University of Denver after earning her Bachelor's Degree in English from Brigham Young University in Idaho. Jimenez's column is dedicated to business and technology tips, trends and best practices for entrepreneurs and small business professionals.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. worli7

    June 14, 2012 at 9:17 am

    When picking a credit card, it is foremost to consider all of your options. There are various factors to take into account, and several factors, which conclude what credit cards you are eligible to receive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business Finance

Kodak’s cyrptocurrency could save themselves and photographers

(FINANCE NEWS) Kodak’s foray into cyrptocurrency is more than a financial play, it could be their very salvation in some peoples’ eyes.

Published

on

kodak kodakcoin

Not one to be left behind, Kodak recently announced their decision to hop on the cryptocurrency bandwagon with their own currency for photographers: KodakCoin. It’s not as hokey as it sounds, we promise.

It’s easy to make fun of Kodak, the Blockbuster of film companies, for buying into the cryptocurrency world, but their motive isn’t as bizarre as it first appears.

KodakCoin is actually a virtual token that will be used on Kodak’s new photographer platform, KodakOne. The idea behind the platform is that photographers can register their work and monetize any cases of copyright infringement, all through the KodakCoin system.

KodakCoin itself is based in the same foundation as Ethereum, and the KodakOne platform uses the same blockchain technology that we’ve come to expect when dealing with cryptocurrency.

As far as KodakOne goes, most of the authentication process is autonomous. Once photographers have uploaded their work and records of fair use, KodakOne searches for instances of unauthorized uploads and then requests payment from the uploader. The payment is processed in KodakCoin, and photographers are left with 60 percent of the resulting currency while Kodak and Wenn Digital share the other 40 percent.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this whole affair is the effect that merely announcing KodakCoin had on Kodak’s stock. After revealing KodakOne and the accompanying KodakCoin at CES on Tuesday, Kodak’s stock hit a high point that more than doubled their previous stock value. This goes to show how infatuated our culture is with cryptocurrency at this point, but it also raises some questions about Kodak’s true motives: is KodakCoin a legitimate enterprise, or a Hail Mary pass?

Kodak’s official stance on the matter is that their move into cryptocurrency represents their initial business goal: to provide photographers with a stable, supportive platform that places their needs and concerns above those of similar venues. On the other hand, sources virtually everywhere have been quick to skewer Kodak for what appears to be an obvious bid for relevancy in an era unsuited for the dinosaur of a company.

There’s no telling where KodakCoin will take the aging company, so for now, these speculations will have to do. KodakCoin goes public on January 31st of this year.

Continue Reading

Business Finance

Super-investor Warren Buffett calls cryptocurrencies a mirage

Famed investor Warren Buffett has stated he believes cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin will end badly because they are a “mirage.”

Published

on

cryptocurrencies

For many, cryptocurrencies have become an investment well worth the risk, but for many others they are something to vehemently rail against. Try posting something on Facebook about crypto and see if you don’t get lovers and haters instantly weighing in.

One of the most prominent members of the “rail against” group is CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, Warren Buffett.

Buffett, while widely respected for his shrewd investment foresight, is not a fan of cryptocurrency and warns potential investors he thinks, “almost with certainty they [cryptocurrency] will come to a bad ending.”

Buffett went on to state to CNBC, that he didn’t really understand how Bitcoin operated but he would never “have a position in them.”

Will Buffett’s word have an impact on cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin? Surprisingly, Buffett’s words have had little effect (so far) on Bitcoin’s value.

Remember a few months ago when Buffett bought Synchrony? The lesser-known stock seemed to take off overnight after Buffett/Berkshire Hathaway’s investment, leading us to believe than many powerful investors take heed of Buffett’s business acumen, which could potentially impact how other investors feel about cryptocurrencies overall.

Buffett told the Washington Post, “there are basically two kinds of assets: one you look to the stream of income it will produce and the other you hope like hell that someone will pay you more for it.” The second type would most definitely include Bitcoin.

Buffett contends that since cryptocurrencies are backed by computer power instead of a national bank, they are unreliable and fluctuate too much to be trusted.

The takeaway?

There is no doubt that Buffett is the go-to man for investments, but how can you repudiate Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies worth if you admittedly do not understand how they work? If you don’t understand how they work, how could you possibly appreciate their value?

I’m not sure if this was meant to be a sarcastic statement on Buffett’s part, or if he genuinely doesn’t understand how they work, but still dislikes them. Back in 2014, Buffett told investors that it was nothing more than a “mirage” and that investors should “stay away from it.”

There’s no doubt, the man is a genius in the business sphere, but is he right about cryptocurrencies?

Continue Reading

Business Finance

Spotify files to go public directly, won’t be the last to buck tradition

(FINANCE) Spotify directly filed to join the stock market late December, forgoing the traditional IPO process. Will other tech companies follow suit?

Published

on

spotify public

It’s official: Spotify, the wildly popular music streaming platform, took a leap and filed with the SEC to become a public company late last year. Many in the tech industry expected this move was in the works, and the news was confirmed by Axios this week.

However, the most noteworthy part of this announcement is how Spotify has chosen to join its competition in the public space.

Instead of entering the stock market through a traditional IPO process, Spotify has reportedly opted for a “direct listing,” which means it won’t need to travel to seek out investors and will bypass bank underwriting fees, among other things. As a direct listing, Spotify could also promote its new business model to the media ahead of its projected Q1 debut, something SEC rules strictly prohibit for IPOs.

The direct listing process could also encourage high stock value sales day-of debut, avoiding a “leave money on the table” situation, which can happen when high net worth individuals and institutional investors get first dibs on IPOs but banks recommend the company only trades up to about 20 percent or so. Under its chosen process, Spotify stock values could debut much higher, driven by demand and what investors are willing – and able – to pay.

By taking this non-traditional route Spotify will, however, forgo potentially millions of dollars they could have fundraised in an IPO. Those dollars could have helped pay down debt or settled lawsuits, but Spotify’s direct listing move seems to be about more than money. Spotify was last valued at $8.5 billion, so it might not need monetary help anyway.

Overall, a direct listing may reduce the hassle of going public. Spotify is just filing paperwork to make it legal for anybody to trade company shares, basically. Direct listing is casual and less structured.

However, some are concerned that chill approach won’t do enough to help Spotify once it’s actually public. Sure, networking with investors to build equity and relationships may be tedious, but those connections could pay off down the road when it’s time for financial reporting and underwriters can help shareholders trade more easily, along with Wall Street sponsorship aids that help buyers and sellers in similar ways, according to David Golden of Revolutions Ventures.

Spotify’s actions could be risky, too, as their stock may not fit customary Wall Street standards and in turn be avoided by some investors, David Menlow, president of IPOfinancial.com, told Marketplace.

For now, all eyes are on Spotify and its decision. Wall Street, industry leaders, and even the SEC are all interested in how their direct listing will play out. As others in the tech space have expressed frustration with the traditional IPO process before (think Uber), more companies may follow suit if Spotify succeeds as a directly listed public company. That could put pressure on Wall Street and the SEC to change the IPO process, too.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

The
American Genius
News neatly in your inbox

Join thousands of AG fans and SUBSCRIBE to get business and tech news updates, breaking stories, and MORE!

Emerging Stories