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Remembering September 11, 2001 – where were you on 9/11?

Originally published in 2008, this visual tribute to 9/11 and stories told by professionals about their experience, remains a touching piece of history as we remember the nation’s tragedy and recovery.

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Comment Highlights:

“I was right across the river in Hoboken working. We watched from the window as plane #2 struck. It felt like we were watching a surreal movie, especially when they started to fall. We were in a panicked shock as we watched.” -John Lauber

“In Los Angeles there is a constant hum from planes and helicopters. That night. Silence. Except the occasional military jet streaking across the sky. It was eerily silent for L.A. and everytime one of those jets did go by, I had to get up and watch more news…just in case.” -Matt Stigliano

“I visited ground zero on Oct 25th 2001. It was by far the most surreal experience of my life. The area was jammed with people, the carnage was unbelievable, signs for the missing were everywhere and it was as silent as a remote field in the country. Really, there are no words to articulate how I felt…’that’ type of emotion has no name…” -Jeff Corbett

“A day or two later, Kevin and I were on a roof, sort of in a daze, sort of doing an inspection. I said, “Do you hear that? It’s a plane.” We sat and listened to this solo plane crossing our airspace. Airspace – a new word to my everyday vocabulary.” -Vicki Moore

“As the horror unfolded throughout the day I kept thinking it couldn’t be real, how could this happen – in America?” -Jack Leblond

“Watching items fall from the sky only to be identifiied as live people jumping from the tops of those towers still haunts me to this day, and I’m glad it does, because as I said, I never want to forget- I won’t forget.” -Benn Rosales

“Now conspiracy theorists make me even sadder the way they somehow can’t accept that there is inexplicable evil that exists in the world – and that the simple, sad explanation is the real one.” -Randy

“People across the nation were scared they were next, it wasn’t just us- everyone could justify a reason as to why their city could be victimized next.” -Lani Anglin-Rosales

“Amazing how I can remember each moment of 9/11 with uncanny acuity. I just hope everyone who’s blessed to be an American will always remember.” -Antoinette Scognamiglio

“We live an hour outside of Washington, DC, a lot of parents work at the pentagon. That is when everyone started to freak out. We were not let out of school, they shut off all the computers and would only let us leave if our parents came and got us.” -Drew Fristoe

“I didn’t make it back to NYC until this last January. I had a friend that lived there and he met me at Ground Zero. It was very emotional. I was sad, and really pissed off. People were standing, staring at that hole in the ground and crying, right along with me.” -Jay Thompson

“Quite an odd feeling to be inundated with such joyous occasions and then awake to the world on fire.” -Austin Aaron

“Silence………..Everyone got up………..went home to their families.” -Missy Caulk

“I was at my first home inspection, about two months into my real estate career. My client was bored, so I pulled the television from the bedroom into the living room. I remember watching the Pentagon get hit and the planes flying into the towers – both were incomprehensible events.” -Jim Duncan

“People just wanted to get away from NY. I can’t tell you how many heart-wrenching accounts of 9/11 I heard driving people around showing homes. I had to pull over more than once because the emotions overcame my ability to navigate the car.” -Lisa Sanderson

“I think we stood in front of that tv for three hours; as the golfers came in off the course to make the ‘turn’ (between nines), none of them went back out to finish their round. They either stayed with us to watch or went directly home.” -Heather Elias

“Diane Sawyer had a camera on the first building as it was burning, and was trying her best to stay composed. As i sat there, watching with millions others, the second plane hit.” -Heather Rankin

“I recognized one guy immediately – the one on the Hawaii flight. I completely lost it at that point. Cant see the screen as i type this.” -Bob Wilson

“As a foreigner we look up to this country because of it’s safety and power and it made me realize how small and vulnerable we all are.” -Ines Hegedus-Garcia

“I stayed home with my kids that day and just cried.” -Jamie Geiger

“I called my Dad, who lived in Brooklyn & worked in building 6(?) of the trade center. OF course, I could not get through. All lines were down/busy from the flood of desperate friends and family members trying to find their loved ones.” -Mariana Wagner

“The only school day EVER where all we did all day was watch the news.” -Jason Sandquist

“I have remained a little on edge every day since it happened.” -Dan Connolly

Article originally published September 11, 2008.

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The American Genius - she has co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

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50 Comments

50 Comments

  1. Nick Bastian

    September 11, 2008 at 11:45 am

    awesome post Lani… God bless America!

  2. Jack Leblond

    September 11, 2008 at 11:51 am

    I was driving to work when the report came over the radio about the first plane. I remember thinking it must have been some bone-head in a Cessna. When I got to my office and turned on the TV, I was shocked to see what was actually happening. As the horror unfolded throughout the day I kept thinking it couldn’t be real, how could this happen – in America? Unfortunately it did happen and many thousands were affected. My heart goes out to all of the people and families who’s lives were forever changed on 9/11.

    We need not fear the future, if we learn from the past.

  3. Jay Thompson

    September 11, 2008 at 11:51 am

    Nicely done. As I posted on my blog, I fear people are forgetting. We can’t ever forget.

  4. Benn Rosales

    September 11, 2008 at 11:53 am

    An amazing display, Lani. This is a bad memory I never want to forget.

  5. Mark Eckenrode | HomeStomper

    September 11, 2008 at 11:58 am

    peace and light.

  6. Lani Anglin-Rosales

    September 11, 2008 at 12:25 pm

    Where were YOU when it hit?

    I was in college at the University of Texas for my BA in English when it happened. I was leaving an English class (that Jenna Bush attended sometimes, by the way) and was passing the main UT tower where protesters and crazy people hang out year round. A lone man who looked homeless was yelling insanely about a plane hitting and a major attack which I ignored (they yell crazy crap all the time). I got to the Student Union in the Tower and saw people crowded around televisions and as I was asking someone what was going on, we saw the second plane hit on live television.

    Everyone’s hearts were in their throats and we were all terrified and confused. I picked up my cell phone to call my friend Christine who went to St. John’s just blocks from the WTC and couldn’t get through. I tried calling my parents to tell them I was okay and couldn’t get through. Everyone in the building was thinking the same thing as the story unfolded, we could be next, the perfect revenge attack would be on the UT tower where the President’s daughter goes to school, where he governed and lived in the Governor’s mansion blocks away and where he’s from.

    People across the nation were scared they were next, it wasn’t just us- everyone could justify a reason as to why their city could be victimized next. Our vigilance should never end- that silence that we all experienced that day as people dropped everything they were doing should never be forgotten. The thousands of lives lost in this tragedy should always be honored and the heroes who gave their lives in the rescue efforts as well. The military men and women that continue to give their lives across the globe to protect ours should be praised. The drama people create in our daily lives is so unimportant when we pause to remember this day.

  7. Benn Rosales

    September 11, 2008 at 12:35 pm

    I was carpooling with my brother into Austin but playing hooky from work when we stopped into a caddilac dealership on the way in. We went over to sit and wait in the lobby and were watching tv just after the first tower was hit. My brother said accident, and I said no way, there’s no way that’s an accident, meanwhile you could make out on the television what appeared to be another plane circling in towards the tower, and then it hit.

    We sat in the dealership for what must have been 2 hours with fellow Austinites watching the coverage- there must have been 50 folks. We prayed with strangers, we held hands, we all cried, as we saw the firefighters enter the buildings, only to watch those same buildings collapse down upon them. That was when it became real, that’s when I became angry, thats when I felt the most helpless.

    Watching items fall from the sky only to be identifiied as live people jumping from the tops of those towers still haunts me to this day, and I’m glad it does, because as I said, I never want to forget- I won’t forget.

  8. Antoinette Scognamiglio

    September 11, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    One of the victims was Donald Gavagan of Cantor Fitzgerald. Donald and I had been friends when we worked together at a public relations firm, Fleishman-Hilliard. We had lunch together, gossiped, went to see Rattle & Hum when it came out. I remember when a bunch of us went to a show at The Ritz in NYC, forget who was playing. He fixed me up with a friend of his, whose name I don’t even remember anymore. Nice enough guy, sent me roses the next day at work; we just didn’t ‘click.’ I lost touch with Don as we “grew up,” changed jobs or total careers, got married, had families. I just found out from a mutual friend two years ago that Donald was lost in 9/11 and left behind a beautiful marriage, complete with children. It just wasn’t fair how so many lives were torn apart that day. So many really nice people, very talented and bright people, just wanting to give their all, keep their families happy and provide for them as much as they could. Rest in peace, Don. You were such a doll…made me laugh my ass off on a fairly constant basis. I pray for you and the loved ones you left behind.

    My cousin worked for a brokerage firm as well, and his wife also, but his wife worked in Tower II. Diego worked in the building across the street which was to collapse hours later after the initial crashes. They were vacationing on some island and just as a fluke, decide to stay another day and extend their vacation. They were due back to work on September 11. His father had just passed away the year before. My comare’ (godmother) said as we sat having coffee the next afternoon, that his father must have swayed him to keep relaxing for a bit more.

    Every September as the weather provides an absolutely perfect day, puffy white clouds, brisk air and cornflower blue skies, just like that day, I’m always taken back to that morning, pulling out of my driveway, getting to my job and then the phone ringing and the news coming in. Then, the news coming on. Amazing how I can remember each moment of 9/11 with uncanny acuity. I just hope everyone who’s blessed to be an American will always remember.

    Striking memorial, Lani. Really beautifully done. Thank you.

  9. Drew Fristoe

    September 11, 2008 at 12:39 pm

    I was a Senior in High School. I had left my wallet in my truck and I wanted to buy lunch. I got a hall pass from my Calculus teacher to go down to the office. On my way down I saw my friend and she told me that planes had flown into building in NYC. I just brushed it off and went on to the office. When I got into the office, all the administrators were running around, I went out and got my wallet, went back to my calculus class and told the class about it. The bell rang we all went to lunch, that is when there was an announcement that informed everyone that planes had flown into the towers and that one had just flown into the Pentagon. We live an hour outside of Washington, DC, a lot of parents work at the pentagon. That is when everyone started to freak out. We were not let out of school, they shut off all the computers and would only let us leave if our parents came and got us. It was one of the most surreal days of my life and I will never forget it.

  10. Matt Stigliano

    September 11, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    I was living in Los Angeles and my wife (then girlfriend) had just come from England to the US to stay. We experienced an earthquake soon after she arrived and having never been in one, it shook her up a bit. She told me not to mention it to her parents or brother as they would worry. Three days later, we were asleep and my phone kept ringing all morning. This was back when I was a full time musician, so my phone never rang that early. I finally got up, annoyed, and started listening to the messages as I made coffee. First message was from her brother saying “We heard what happened, hope you’re alright.” Second, from her parents, same basic message. Third one I listened to was my dad in Pittsburgh saying, “I don’t know if you heard what’s going on, but they’re evacuating downtown Pittsburgh, just wanted to call and tell you we’re alright.” No one specifically mentioned what was “happening,” but they all referenced it. I sat down on the couch and turned on the TV. There it was. I sat for hours glued to that TV. Being in the music business I had a lot of friends in NY, so I had a lot of calls to make. I made most of them to friends of those friends, knowing I’d never get through to the people in the city. President Bush urged Americans to go about their business. I had a appointment to open a bank account that day and I kept it. Withdrew all my money from Bank Of America and put it into a different bank (I wasn’t a big fan of my bank). Watched TVs in both banks as I completed the transactions. Set up some things to enable me to purchase my first ever home. Still remember all the little details of the day.

    I remember laying in bed that night. In Los Angeles there is a constant hum from planes and helicopters. That night. Silence. Except the occasional military jet streaking across the sky. It was eerily silent for L.A. and everytime one of those jets did go by, I had to get up and watch more news…just in case.

  11. Jay Thompson

    September 11, 2008 at 12:48 pm

    My wife woke me up saying a plane had hit the WTC. My immediate reaction was “that can’t be an accident.” I was getting ready for work and saw the second plane hit live. I called in sick and stayed glued to the TV. Francy and I tried to figure out how we were going to explain this to our kids, one of whose tenth birthday was that very day.

    At 10 and 8, they had a difficult time understanding how someone could do something like this. Understandable as I was having the same struggle at 40… Still do seven years later.

    I lived in Brooklyn in 1970 – 72 when the towers were being built. I remember when dad got transferred I was sad because I wouldn’t get to see the towers finished. I didn’t make it back to NYC until this last January. I had a friend that lived there and he met me at Ground Zero. It was very emotional. I was sad, and really pissed off. People were standing, staring at that hole in the ground and crying, right along with me.

  12. AustinAaron

    September 11, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    I was asleep after quit an evening at the Mandalay Bay pool in Las Vegas. I actually didn’t even learn of the incident until 3 hours after it happened. Quite an odd feeling to be inundated with such joyous occasions and then awake to the world on fire. Drew said it best . . . surreal.

    I think this very second is a fantastic time to call those you love and remind them of the fact.

  13. Missy Caulk

    September 11, 2008 at 12:53 pm

    Well as I said on my post this AM, we are too quick to forget. We remember on days like this, but do we really think about the implications of what happened that day and how important it is to remember our history. If we do not remember our history we are doomed to make pasts mistakes.

    I was in a company office meeting, My brokers cell phone was blowing up, as was another agents. Jim got up and left the room when he walked back in, set a radio down on the conference room table.

    Silence………..

    Everyone got up………..went home to their families.

  14. Jim Duncan

    September 11, 2008 at 12:55 pm

    I was at my first home inspection, about two months into my real estate career. My client was bored, so I pulled the television from the bedroom into the living room. I remember watching the Pentagon get hit and the planes flying into the towers – both were incomprehensible events. I called my wife, picked up the kid from school and just watched tv for the next few days.

  15. John Lauber

    September 11, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    I was right across the river in Hoboken working. We watched from the window as plane #2 struck. It felt like we were watching a surreal movie, especially when they started to fall. We were in a panicked shock as we watched. Emergency vehicles crowded the train station next to our building in case they brought people across the river. I had to work my way by car and foot to Jersey City,again across from the WTC, to my hotel where I promptly gathered my stuff and checked out. The smoke followed me down the NJ turnpike as I drove back to PA.

    When I arrived back in PA I just sat there in shock. I took my kids to the park to play.

    I couldn’t believe I had to go back up 2 days later. Driving towards the Holland tunnel was smoke instead of towers. It was a bit freaky to say the least. I will never forget that day and what I saw.

  16. Seth Parker

    September 11, 2008 at 1:13 pm

    I was in my first year of college, English class I think. Talk about a weird series of events after that.

  17. Rob Hahn

    September 11, 2008 at 1:42 pm

    All of us at Onboard — we’re New Yorkers, after all — are getting our thoughts down on this thread here:

    https://blog.onboardinformatics.com/2008/09/we-remember/#comment-28

    My remembrance is the first comment.

    -rsh

  18. Randy

    September 11, 2008 at 1:51 pm

    I was at home in Mississauga, Ontario working on several projects with companies throughout Manhattan. I had been watching TV after reports of a small plane had hit the tower, nothing could prepare myself nor anyone else as we watched live as the second plane crashed into the other tower. I was chatting through MSN to a company in the area just north of the Towers, and it seemed I was getting way more information than them – despite the absolute horror of the situation that was occurring at the World Trade Center – the terror was upped a notch when word came that the Pentagon had been hit and that there was another missing plane out there somewhere and no one knew where it was coming. Luckily, no one I knew was killed in the tragedy – but everyone and their business was affected in some way or another. For the next year or so, I would get shivers just seeing a plane in the sky. Still don’t like to see plane and building within the same viewpoint.

    The big news in Canada was the grounding on the airplanes from all over the world, airport runways were jammed from coast to coast with stranded passengers. People in my hometown of Halifax were driving to the airport to help strangers and take them into their homes for the several days before things could be sorted out – within the horror of the days events, seeing people come together to share their feelings and support was inspiring.

    Now conspiracy theorists make me even sadder the way they somehow can’t accept that there is inexplicable evil that exists in the world – and that the simple, sad explanation is the real one.

    cheers everyone from Toronto

  19. Guy

    September 11, 2008 at 1:57 pm

    Sympathy is good. Patriotism is good. Critical thinking is better.

  20. Lisa Sanderson

    September 11, 2008 at 1:58 pm

    I was working that day…in the office before everyone else. One of my associates came in and said ‘did you hear a plane hit the WTC?’. I said ‘no way, how does THAT happen.’ In came my client and we were off to look at homes. We watched the first tower fall in a stranger’s living room, standing in front of the tv dumbfounded. That client ended up working on the rescue & recovery efforts for weeks after the attack.

    The Poconos is home to many people who commute to NY for work. I remember seeing one of my recent buyers on the news that night-she was stuck with a bus full of people just outside the city. And here is an essay written by one of my neighbors in my community about her close call: https://poprl.com/08C

    I too had a lot of trouble explaining why to my then 9 & 7 year old daughters. They came home from school that day very scared and worried for their friends whose parents worked in the City.

    The real estate market here really took off after that day. People just wanted to get away from NY. I can’t tell you how many heart-wrenching accounts of 9/11 I heard driving people around showing homes. I had to pull over more than once because the emotions overcame my ability to navigate the car. We have lots of survivors around here and lots of brave rescue workers, many of which still suffer physical and mental ills because of that day.

    9/11 will not be forgotten. Ever.

  21. Heather Elias

    September 11, 2008 at 2:04 pm

    I was at the golf course with my husband Mike; at the time I owned the restaurant/grill room there and was covering it alone that morning. Our twins were going to preschool two days a week, but this wasn’t one of the days and they were there with us. I had the TV turned on as I worked, as usual. Was prepping for lunch and glanced up to see the beginning of the coverage..I yelled for Mike to come over from the pro shop…I think we stood in front of that tv for three hours; as the golfers came in off the course to make the ‘turn’ (between nines), none of them went back out to finish their round. They either stayed with us to watch or went directly home.

    I remember feeling so grateful for the fact that my three year old twins were *with me*…that I could wrap them in my arms to keep them safe; if they had been at their preschool (directly next to the FAA building) I would have lost my mind until I could get to them…

    Being 30 miles from DC..I remember watching through the wall of windows in the pro shop for the fighter jets that were being scrambled and sent to DC..and I remember driving the Capitol beltway in the coming weeks, watching those jets circling, circling the airspace around DC, the only planes in the sky.

    We got pregnant with our third child about three or four months later, and I can’t tell you how many people came up and told me how brave we were to bring a child into ‘this new world’…I’m so glad that pervasive fear has subsided, but we do need to hold on to the memory of that day and the days that directly followed; I wish the clarity of priorities everyone had then would have lasted longer…

  22. Heather Rankin

    September 11, 2008 at 2:12 pm

    I woke up with a headache that morning, which is rare. Instead of doing my morning exercises I decided to turn on the tv – a rare thing. Diane Sawyer had a camera on the first building as it was burning, and was trying her best to stay composed. As i sat there, watching with millions others, the second plane hit.

    I was working at a secure government facility, Glen Canyon Dam, as the tour guide supervisor. I drove the 15 miles to the dam, just to make sure… sure it was ok, sure my friends and coworkers were ok. The visitors center at the dam was closed for a week. Tourists by the droves were stuck in the Page Lake Powell area with no flights out. Rental cars we all gone by 10:00 am.

    My band, Sage, was also under contract to perform at the Rainbow Room at Wahweap Marina on Lake Powell three nights a week until the end of October. Everything here just stopped. Boats, music, tourism, recreation for the rest of the year. It was like winter hit here overnight.

    Missy is right, people tend to too easily go back to their lives, jobs, families, and the memory fades.

  23. JeffX

    September 11, 2008 at 2:49 pm

    I had just gotten into my office at 9am, wasn’t listening to the radio on the way in cause I was on the phone.

    As I passed my secretary she asked if I saw the plane run into the WTC, I turned on the TV in my office which was showing both towers burning, the 2nd plane had just hit.

    I told everyone to go home to their families, closed my office door, called my mom told her I loved her and watched it all unfold until 10pm from my office couch, which seemed like 30 minutes instead of 12 hours. I didn’t eat or drink a thing…never crossed my mind. All I remember was waves of emotion, rolling from extreme sadness to extreme anger…feeling helpless, wanting to do something, anything…

    I visited ground zero on Oct 25th 2001. It was by far the most surreal experience of my life. The area was jammed with people, the carnage was unbelievable, signs for the missing were everywhere and it was as silent as a remote field in the country. Really, there are no words to articulate how I felt…’that’ type of emotion has no name…

  24. Bob

    September 11, 2008 at 4:15 pm

    In May we were in Hawaii. We were able to delay our flight and took a red eye back to San Diego instead. We were stuck in the last row of seats that didnt recline. While most slept, I spent most of the five hours talking to the flight attendant. A married guy with a couple of kids. Real nice with a friendly smile that put you at ease immediately.

    On 9/11 I couldn’t sleep and was up earlier than normal. I went into my home office at 6 am, fired up the laptop and turned on the small set on my desk to the Today Show. When the first plane hit, they showed the footage thinking it was an accident. I called my wife and said you gotta see this, and then the 2nd plane hit. I knew immediately. I went numb and stayed that way. Later when they flashed the pictures of some of the crew. I recognized one guy immediately – the one on the Hawaii flight. I completely lost it at that point. Cant see the screen as i type this.

  25. ines

    September 11, 2008 at 4:21 pm

    I was watching the news while getting dressed in the morning and just froze in disbelief, I called Rick to see if he was OK, then my mom and when the second plane hit I was already in tears. I took off to pick up my kids from school fearing the horror would not stop there. I was numb for such a long time and to this day cannot believe something like that would happen in the U.S. As a foreigner we look up to this country because of it’s safety and power and it made me realize how small and vulnerable we all are.
    Now I can’t believe they are building some deconstructivist project in its place – I always imagined a somber and powerful project – I know I’m not alone in feeling this, but also understand it’s impossible to please everyone.

  26. Jason Sandquist

    September 11, 2008 at 5:06 pm

    Senior at Eagan High School. I was in between classes, chatting with friends, walking up the stairs that I walked up so many times before. When I got to the stairs, it was chaos. Students and faculty members where running around saying so many things it was hard to believe what really happened until I, myself was able to see witness the horrific tragedy. The only school day EVER where all we did all day was watch the news.

    For those that lost their lives, gone… but not FORGOTTEN

  27. Mariana Wagner

    September 11, 2008 at 5:46 pm

    The first word that I learned to read on my own was “MANHATTAN” … as a small child who would ride the subways with my Mom.

    This was our first day in real estate – 9/11/08. I was still at my previous job at a local HS (doubling up RE agent/SPED teacher for the 1st few months). Secretary knew I grew up in NYC and called me in to tell me that a plane crashed into one of the twin towers. I went online and found nothing, then found a room that had a TV and turned it on just in time to see the 2nd plane hit.

    I called Derek, who was putting on his new suit and getting ready for walking into and office instead of an auto body shop for the first time. I told him what was happening. His RE office was closed … all mall stores were shut down.

    I called my Dad, who lived in Brooklyn & worked in building 6(?) of the trade center. OF course, I could not get through. All lines were down/busy from the flood of desperate friends and family members trying to find their loved ones. It took me 5 hours to get through only to find out that my Dad (who’s self-employed) woke up that morning and since he didn’t feel “up to snuff”, he decided to go into work a few hours late … a few hours that could have potentially saved his life.

    I am blessed. There is at least 2 degrees of separation between me (who has dozens of close friends and family members in and around Manhattan) and all those who lost their lives that day.

    We must NEVER forget.

  28. Jamie Geiger

    September 11, 2008 at 5:47 pm

    A person that used to work for me had just visited the twin towers, the week prior. I was at home, when I got a call to turn on the TVs, just as the second plane was hitting the towers. I stayed home with my kids that day and just cried.

  29. Bill Lublin

    September 11, 2008 at 8:21 pm

    I was driving to work listening to Howard stern, whn I heard him say “A plane hit the World Trade Center?” Minutes later I was in my office looking at the film of the planes striking the towers.
    With family in living and working Manhattan and Washington DC, we were on the phone most of the morning locating everyone with a sense of grief and surrealism that still haunts me.

    The strangest event of the day was the story of my son’s college roomate who had gone to the WTC for work, saw the chaos and ran back back home, locking his apartment door and shaking from what he had witnessed.

  30. Dan Connolly

    September 11, 2008 at 10:49 pm

    I happened to flip on the news on TV right after the first plane hit and saw the second plane hit on live TV. I was mesmerized and remained glued to the television and internet for days. Was shaken to the core. I have had to check the news every morning since to see if something terrible has happened while we slept. I don’t want to leave the house or start working without a quick check to see`if the other shoe dropped, I have remained a little on edge every day since it happened.

  31. Nick Nymark

    September 10, 2010 at 10:47 pm

    Great Post! Just watched a 1 HR show on the History Channel about September 11

  32. Bruce Lemieux

    September 11, 2010 at 9:18 pm

    The event was horrific, but listening to the personal stories of the victims on NPR, and reading about them in the Washington Post is what affected me the most. Their stories brought me to tears for weeks. This was a tragic reminder that our country is made up of so many normal, yet extraordinary good people. The human loss was staggering — something I’ll never forget.

    And when we have a day like today that’s just perfect — clear blue sky, no humidity and temp in the 70s — I remember 9/11.

  33. Hal Benz

    September 11, 2010 at 10:10 pm

    I was working as the VP for Operations in a NJ health care system on that awful morning. I remember helping to clear hospital units for the anticipated wave of patients…that never came. I remember sending nurses to ground zero to assist, and seeing the look in their eyes when they returned. It wasn’t until I finally got home and saw the horrifying images of the tower’s collapsing on TV, that the full impact really hit me. It’s an experience that I’ll never forget. It’s been seared into my soul.

    And as I type these words, I can look out my window and see two columns of light shining into the heavens far of in the distance.

    As long as i have breath in my body, I will never forget…

  34. Robert D. Ashby

    September 12, 2010 at 9:50 am

    I am late to this post as I am currently in Brasil. I decided this year not to post my usual on the subject, mostly because I have limited internet access down here. That being said, let me answer the question of where I was…

    I was living in Northern Virginia at the time and could see the smoke from the Pentagon. Some of you know I actually fly for American Airlines (since 2000), so I knew some of the crew that were on the aircraft involved. Needless to say, I received numerous phone calls that day making sure I wasn’t one of them. I was also there, with my son, when we began flying again, taking part in the ceremony which involved an American flag being flown around the country. And of course, we live in the aftermath everyday.

    That day is one I will never forget!

  35. Joe Loomer

    September 12, 2010 at 10:08 am

    An outstanding compilation of quotes, memories, and pictures. Thank you Lani.

    I was in the Officers Club building aboard the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, California. In the Navy, there is a traditional transition period for those Sailors selected to the grade of Chief Petty Officer, the Chief Selectees (those soon to be promoted to Chief) were serving us established Chiefs breakfast. But I digress. Bump – otherwise known as Senior Chief Shannon Hickman – came in from the next-door lounge where the TV was on and said a plane had just crashed in to the WTC. I remembered a small aircraft once hit the towers, and my father had recounted the story of a bomber that accidentally struck the Empire State Building during WWII. I thought it was an accident, and was standing there watching live as the second plane hit. My very first thought was “we are at war.”

    The Defense Language Institute trains all the military branches, all the Arabic, Persian-Farsi, Pashto, Hebrew, Urdu – you name it – linguists in service. For this very reason we were somewhat apprehensive that we would be targetted that day since these very linguists would certainly be needed for what was to come. Classes were cancelled for that day and the next – hung around the Navy HQ building with the other Chiefs, drinking coffee and watching the news non-stop – calming the young Sailors down.

    Freedom isn’t free, and if we continue to allow minorities to dictate our security policies, to control our screening procedures for everything from drivers licenses to boarding a plane, we will find out again how costly Freedom truly can be. It will probably be soon.

    Navy Chief, Navy Pride

  36. mooersrealty

    September 12, 2010 at 8:14 pm

    The oldest of four, a daughter 16 was a page in Washington, where the plane went in to the Pentagon. She was in the Library of Congress when the Capitol police evactuated the place. I remember.

  37. Greg Fleischaker

    September 15, 2010 at 4:58 pm

    Like everyone else here, I remember all too well where I was that day. My wife was flying from Boston to L.A. that day and I hadn’t heard about the first plane. My sister called and asked about my wife and whether I had heard from her. I hadn’t. Then my wife’s company called asking if I had heard. And then her father. Of course I couldn’t reach her, all phone lines were down. I went home and watched on tv, trying her cell phone every 5 or 10 minutes, with no luck. It was the longest day, there was a real chance she had been on one of the planes to go into the towers. Eventually she called, had no clue what had happened, had been in a business meeting all day, and was very confused when we finally spoke and all I could do was cry.

  38. Fawn Astrid

    September 22, 2010 at 10:18 am

    I was in my dorm room at Hofstra University. Since I was a college student I was still asleep when the first tower was hit. My roommate had left her tv on and I woke up to the news coverage. My building had a clear view of Manhattan from the 13th floor lounge.

    I made it up to the 13th floor just as the tv reporters were announcing that the second tower has been hit.

    From my view, it looked like Manhattan had been decimated. Smoke filled the sky. It was devastating.

  39. bank reconciliation

    September 26, 2010 at 7:55 am

    I was in my office when I saw those heart breaking footages in news. It was really fruststing to see those and to be in such a situation. That is really a black day in American History.

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Austin

Austin tops the list of best places to buy a home

When looking to buy a home, taking the long view is important before making such a huge investment – where are the best places to make that commitment?

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Looking at the bigger picture

(REALUOSO.COM) – Let us first express that although we are completely biased about Texas (we’re headquartered here, I personally grew up here), the data is not – Texas is the best. That’s a scientific fact. There’s a running joke in Austin that if there is a list of “best places to [anything],” we’re on it, and the joke causes eye rolls instead of humility (we’re sore winners and sore losers in this town).

That said, SelfStorage.com dug into the data and determined that the top 12 places to buy a home are currently Texas and North Carolina (and Portland, I guess you’re okay too or whatever).

They examined the nerdiest of numbers from the compound annual growth rate in inflation-adjusted GDP to cost premium, affordability, taxes, job growth, and housing availability.

“Buying a house is a big decision and a big commitment,” the company notes. “Although U.S. home prices have risen in the long term, the last decade has shown that path is sometimes full of twists, turns, dizzying heights and steep, abrupt falls. Today, home prices are stabilizing and increasing in most areas of the U.S.”

Click here to continue reading the list of the 12 best places to buy a home…

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Housing News

Average age of houses on the rise, so is it now better or worse to buy new?

With aging housing in America, are first-time buyers better off buying new or existing homes? The average age of a home is rising, as is the price of new housing, so a shift could be upon us.

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aging housing inventory

The average home age is higher than ever

(REALUOSO.COM) – In a survey from the Department of Housing and Urban Development American Housing Survey (AHS), the median age of homes in the United States was 35 years old. In Texas, homes are a bit younger with the median age between 19 – 29 years. The northeast has the oldest homes, with the median age between 50 – 61 years. In 1985, the median age of a home was only 23 years.

With more houses around 40 years old, the National Association of Realtors asserts that homeowners will have to undertake remodeling and renovation projects before selling unless the home is sold as-is, in which case the buyer will be responsible to update their new residence. Even homeowners who aren’t selling will need to consider remodeling for structural and aesthetic reasons.

Prices of new homes on the rise

Newer homes cost more than they used to. The price differential between new homes and older homes has increased from 10 percent traditionally to around 37 percent in 2014. This is due to rising construction costs, scarcity of lots, and a low inventory of new homes that doesn’t meet the demand.

Click here to continue reading this story…

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Housing News

Are Realtors the real loser in the fight between Zillow Group and Move, Inc.?

The last year has been one of dramatic and rapid change in the real estate tech sector, but Realtors are vulnerable, and we’re worried.

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Why Realtors are vulnerable to these rapid changes

(REALUOSO.COM) – Corporate warfare demands headlines in every industry, but in the real estate tech sector, a storm has been brewing for years, which in the last year has come to a head. Zillow Group and Move, Inc. (which is owned by News Corp. and operates ListHub, Realtor.com, TopProducer, and other brands) have been competing for a decade now, and the race has appeared to be an aggressive yet polite boxing match. Last year, the gloves came off, and now, they’ve drawn swords and appear to want blood.

Note: We’ll let you decide which company plays which role in the image above.

So how then, does any of this make Realtors the victims of this sword fight? Let’s get everyone up to speed, and then we’ll discuss.

1. Zillow poaches top talent, Move/NAR sues

It all started last year when the gloves came off – Move’s Chief Strategy Officer (who was also Realtor.com’s President), Errol Samuelson jumped ship and joined Zillow on the same day he phoned in his resignation without notice. He left under questionable circumstances, which has led to a lengthy legal battle (wherein Move and NAR have sued Zillow and Samuelson over allegations of breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty, and misappropriation of trade secrets), with the most recent motion being for contempt, which a judge granted to Move/NAR after the mysterious “Samuelson Memo” surfaced.

Salt was added to the wound when Move awarded Samuelson’s job to Move veteran, Curt Beardsley, who days after Samuelson left, also defected to Zillow. This too led to a lawsuit, with allegations including breach of contract, violation of corporations code, illegal dumping of stocks, and Move has sought restitution. These charges are extremely serious, but demanded slightly less attention than the ongoing lawsuit against Samuelson.

2. Two major media brands emerge

Last fall, the News Corp. acquisition of Move, Inc. was given the green light by the feds, and this month, Zillow finalized their acquisition of Trulia.

…Click here to continue reading this story…

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