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Who is more social online, men or women?

According to a new study, it would seem that women utilize a distinct set of social networking sites more than men, but why?

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Men and women use social media differently

It would seem that women are more social than men. Or perhaps women are just utilizing social media more frequently than men. According to research gathered by Internet Social Providers, men and women utilize social networking sites very differently, specifically how they interact with Google+, Myspace, LinkedIn, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, and Facebook.

How the sexes differ

Women frequent Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook far more than men, in fact, each month 40 million more women visit Twitter than men, and women participate in 62 percent of the sharing on Facebook, and make up 58 percent of the user base. Pinterest boasts a 70 percent female user base, and interestingly enough, Pinterest drives more business referral traffic than Google+, LinkedIn, and YouTube combined, leading one to believe that women are having a more significant influence over the social marketplace.

For men, Google+, LinkedIn, and YouTube are the main sources of social networking time. Google+ is comprised of 64 percent men, whereas LinkedIn is 54 percent male user based. About 75 percent of the men that use LinkedIn use it to research other companies and only one in ten men opt for the paid version of LinkedIn’s services. With over 280 million active YouTube accounts, it is not surprising that over 54 percent of all users are male. Roughly 25 percent of men watch something on YouTube daily, compared to only 17 percent of women. It could be inferred that men have more free time, or perhaps they simply enjoy videos, whereas, women seem to prefer the more conversational aspects of Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

What could this mean?

In a world where women and men are more equal than ever, perhaps it would be a good idea for women to spend some more time with the apparently male-dominated Google+, LinkedIn, and YouTube, and men could spend more time connecting with friends and co-workers on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Since Facebook offers the ability to chat, play games, and keep in touch, men should not have any problem finding something they can enjoy. And YouTube offers a great deal of instructional videos from auto repair to building your own bookshelf, so women should take advantage of it more often. In all honestly, some of the pins on Pinterest come from YouTube, so I would be interested in seeing if this research makes any cross-references for that data.

Another explanation for the differences could be as simple as personal preference. I know I enjoy Twitter because of the short messaging allowance. It is easier to catch up with everyone at once because the messages are short, and media shows up as links, rather than filling up half the screen, as is common occurrence on Facebook. Perhaps men simply enjoy watching a tutorial rather than reading about it (YouTube versus Pinterest).

I am sure an argument could be made for the differences in the ways in which women’s and men’s brains work, but, I prefer to think that we all engage with content differently and in our socially enriched world, we should all be free to choose whatever we enjoy without worrying about statistics. We get enough of those at work; social media allows us to reconnect, share, and relax, why muddle it with a gender debate?

Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Eric Hempler

    July 21, 2013 at 9:48 pm

    A common theme I’ve noticed is that fans of facebook pages tends to be about 60% women and 40% men…maybe that’s comparable to the ratio of who uses the site

  2. ShellyKramer

    July 22, 2013 at 10:12 am

    Interesting post, Jennifer. I was looking for your data, though, and couldn’t find it via the source link above. Which made me sad.

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Social Media

Grindr got busted for selling users’ data locations to advertisers

(SOCIAL MEDIA) User data has been a hot topic in the tech world. It’s often shared haphazardly or not protected, and the app Grindr, follows suit.

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Grindr on phone in man's hands

If you’re like me, you probably get spam calls a lot. Information is no longer private in this day and age; companies will buy and sell whatever information they can get their hands on for a quick buck. Which is annoying, but not necessarily outright dangerous, right?

Wrong.

Grindr has admitted to selling their user’s data, however, they are specifically selling the location of their users without regard for liability concerns. Grindr, a gay hook-up app, is an app where a marginalized community is revealing their location to find a person to connect to. Sure, Grindr claims they have been doing this less and less since 2020, but the issue still remains: they have been selling the location of people who are in a marginalized community – a community that has faced a huge amount of oppression in the past and is still facing it to this day.

Who in their right mind thought this was okay? Grindr initially did so to create “real-time ad exchanges” for their users, to find places super close to their location. Which makes sense, sort of. The root of the issue is that the LGBTQAI+ community is a community at risk. How does Grindr know if all of their users are out? Do they know exactly who they’re selling this information to? How do they know that those who bought the information are going to use it properly?

They don’t have any way of knowing this and they put all of their users at risk by selling their location data. And the data is still commercially available! Historical data could still be obtained and the information was able to be purchased in 2017. Even if somebody stopped using Grindr in, say, 2019, the fact they used Grindr is still out there. And yeah, the data that’s been released has anonymized, Grindr claims, but it’s really easy to reverse that and pin a specific person to a specific location and time.

This is such a huge violation of privacy and it puts people in real, actual danger. It would be so easy for bigots to get that information and use it for something other than ads. It would be so easy for people to out others who aren’t ready to come out. It’s ridiculous and, yeah, Grindr claims they’re doing it less, but the knowledge of what they have done is still out there. There’s still that question of “what if they do it again” and, with how the world is right now, it’s really messed up and problematic.

If somebody is attacked because of the data that Grindr sold, is Grindr complicit in that hate crime, legally or otherwise?

So, moral of the story?

Yeah, selling data can get you a quick buck, but don’t do it.

You have no idea who you’re putting at risk by selling that data and, if people find out you’ve done it, chances are your customers (and employees) will lose trust in you and could potentially leave you to find something else. Don’t risk it!

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Social Media

BeReal: Youngsters are flocking in droves to this Instagram competitor app

(SOCIAL MEDIA) As Instagram loses steam due to its standards of “perfection posting,” users are drawn to a similar app with a different approach, BeReal.

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BeReal is one of several “Real” apps exploding in growth with young users who crave real connections with people they know in real life.

According to data.ai, BeReal ranks 4th by downloads in the US, the UK, and France for Q1 2022 to date, behind only Instagram, Snapchat, and Pinterest.

BeReal flies in the face of what social media has become. Instead of curated looks that focus on the beautiful parts of life, BeReal users showcase what they’re doing at the moment and share those real photos with their friends. Their real friends.

It’s real. And real is different for a generation of social media users who have been raised on influencers and filters.

As the app says when you go to its page:

Be Real.

Your Friends

for Real.

Every day at a different time, BeReal users are notified simultaneously to capture and share a Photo in 2 Minutes.

A new and unique way to discover who your friends really are in their daily life.

BeReal app

The app has seen monthly users increase by more than 315% according to Apptopia, which tracks and analyzes app performance.

“Push notifications are sent around the world simultaneously at different times each day,” the company said in a statement. “It’s a secret on how the time is chosen every day, it’s not random.”

The app allows no edits and no filters. They want users to show a “slice of their lives.”

Today’s social media users have seen their lives online inundated with ultra-curated social media. The pandemic led to more time spent online than ever. Social media became a way to escape. Reality was ugly. Social media was funny, pretty, and exciting.

And fake.

Enter BeReal where users are asked to share two moments of real life on a surprise schedule. New apps are fun often because they’re new. However, the huge growth in the use of BeReal by college-aged users points to something more than the new factor.

For the past several years, experts have warned that social media was dangerous to our mental health. The dopamine hits of likes and shares are based on photos and videos filled with second and third takes, lens changes, lighting improvements, and filters. Constant comparisons are the norm. And even though we know the world we present on our social pages isn’t exactly an honest portrayal of life, we can’t help but experience FOMO when we see our friends and followers and those we follow having the times of their lives, buying their new it thing, trying the new perfect product, playing in their Pinterest-worthy decorated spaces we wish we could have.

None of what we see is actually real on our apps. We delete our media that isn’t what we want to portray and try again from a different angle and shoot second and third and forth takes that make us look just a little better.

We spend hours flipping through videos on our For You walls and Instagram stories picked by algorithms that know us better than we know ourselves.

BeReal is the opposite of that. It’s simple, fast, and real. It’s community and fun, but it’s a moment instead of turning into the time-sink of our usual social media that, while fun, is also meant to ultimately sell stuff, including all our data.

It will be interesting to watch BeReal and see if it continues down its promised path and whether the growth continues. People are looking for something. Maybe reality is that answer.

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Team of deaf engineers at Snap create feature to help users learn ASL

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Snapchat engineers known as the “Deafengers” have created an ASL Alphabet Lens to help users learn the basics of ASL.

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Snap ASL feature

A team of Deaf and hard-of-hearing Snapchat engineers known as the “Deafengers” at the company have created an ASL Alphabet Lens to help users learn the basics of American Sign Language.

Using AR Technology, the Lens teaches users to fingerspell their names, practice the ASL Alphabet and play games to “put their new skills to the test.”

The Lens, launched last month, is the first of its kind and encourages users to learn American Sign Language.

In a press release Snapchat said, “For native signers, in a world where linguistic inequity is prevalent, we believe AR can help evolve the way we communicate. We look forward to learning more from our community as we strive to continuously improve experiences for everyone on Snapchat.”

Austin Vaday, one of the deaf engineers who helped develop the Lens said helping the world understand sign language is important. He shared his story with NBC correspondent Erin McLaughlin on TODAY after the Lens was released.

Vaday didn’t learn American Sign Language until he was 12. Before then he relied mostly on lip-reading to communicate. ASL changed his life. That life-changing moment helped inspire the ASL Alphabet Lens.

The ASL Alphabet Lens was designed and developed over six months in partnership with SignAll.

There are approximately 48 million deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States, according to the National Association of the Deaf.

Vaday said the ASL Alphabet Lens came from the desire to find a way to appropriately and properly educate people so they can communicate with those who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Vaday said the team focused on the core values of intelligence, creativity, and empathy while working on the project and it’s a step to opening communication for all Snap users with the deaf and hard of hearing community.

The ASL Alphabet Lens is available to all Snapchat users.

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