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The future is here, Facebook is building brain-computer interfaces

(TECH NEWS) Facebook has a team of engineers studying and working on ways to make brain-computer interfaces a thing.

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Text with your mind

It’s finally here! The day I’ve been waiting for after a decade of reading dystopian fiction—mind to text messaging. Well, at least the first steps to getting there.

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On Wednesday, Facebook announced at F8 they have a team of 60 engineers building a brain-computer interface.

Remote control brain

This would theoretically let you control augmented and virtual reality with your mind. No typing, no screen, no controller.

It’s “direct brain interface,” which uses optical imaging to scan your brain, detecting internal speech.

The interface would scan your brain hundreds of times per second, translating thoughts to text.

Regina Dugan, Facebook’s R&D division Building 8 head, said the goal is to reach a typing speed of 100 words per minute. This is five times faster than how long it takes to type on a phone. Oh and guess what? No surgical implants required.

Building 8

Building 8’s project began six months ago, and they are now working with several universities. John Hopkins Medicine and John Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco, and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are all involved in the project so far.

The researchers specialize in machine learning, decoding speech and language with optical neuroimaging systems.

Their technologies utilize advanced spatial resolution and neural prosthetics to interpret brain signals.

Add it to the list of hesitations about cyborgs

In all my excitement, I failed to consider that this is some people’s futuristic robot nightmare. Don’t worry, Facebook figured you would have some doubts. They assured TechCrunch that the technology won’t decode any random thought.

You have to decide to send the thought by sending it to the speech center of your brain in order to share.

Reassured? No, it still sounds kind of sketchy I suppose. Well, how about a way for humans to hear through skin? Building 8 is also working on prototypes that allow your skin to mimic hearing. The technology lets people hear through their skin by using a system that simulates the cochlea in your ear.

Delightfully vague

If you’re interested, Facebook is looking to hire a Brain-Computer Interface Engineer. Until recently, Building 8’s purpose was kind of secret. As in, no one really knew what they were doing and then some job listings showed up regarding machine learning and neuroimaging jobs.

This is all very secret lair sci-fi villain behavior, but I’m down.

Sure, this opens up some horrifying implications about our future as robo-human hybrid cyborgs. I don’t have faith in Facebook to execute this in a way that isn’t unsettling. But really, texting would be so much easier if we didn’t have to type with our thumbs.

Plus, developing these technologies would be a huge breakthrough for anyone currently unable to communicate through mainstream means.

We’re already in a world where implanted sensors allow paralyzed individuals to type with their minds. New research into brain-computer interface could mean this is possible without surgical implants.

Sci-fi in real life

Okay fine, I’ll admit it is a bit freaky. Ten years ago, Facebook hardly seemed likely to harbor in a sci-fi revolution. Now they’re at the forefront of dozens of innovative projects. Will these products have a sinister impact on our lives? Probably. But just like everything else Facebook does, we’ll complain for a while then get used to it.

#MindToText

Lindsay is an editor for The American Genius with a Communication Studies degree and English minor from Southwestern University. Lindsay is interested in social interactions across and through various media, particularly television, and will gladly hyper-analyze cartoons and comics with anyone, cats included.

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How to find remote jobs if you’re on the go

(TECH NEWS) As remote working increases in popularity finding jobs seems to be getting harder. Here are a few options to give you a head start.

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Looking to satisfy your wanderlust but need to find a way to pay for those craft beers and lattes?

Maybe you just need a change in scenery but your current job will not allow you to work remotely. With co-working spaces, numerous locations with free Wi-Fi, and your good old-fashioned Starbucks, finding a space for remote work has never been easier.

Finding work to do in these spaces is the hard part. I’m here to help! As it turns out, there are resources to find remote work-no office or dress code necessary.

You may be ready for a new city, but unsure of where to go.

For that, Nomad List is the place to go. At Nomad List you can compare rent prices, weather, safety, Wi-Fi speeds, and even the best nightlife.

Once you’ve got your location nailed down (or a few locations), you’ll need some work. Remote OK is one of numerous sites for that.

If you are looking for work but aren’t sure where to find it, Remote OK provides a collection of 25,000+ jobs on their board with links directly to the employer. With everything from technical writing and front-end design to sales, support and recruiting, this site is sure to have an option for you.

Another similar site is Remotive, where you can see jobs immediately pop up from companies you’ve heard of like GitHub or Upworthy, or you can search through different categories, like marketing, HR, or engineering.

We Work Remotely and RemoteBase are also great spots to find work with easy to navigate interfaces and thorough job descriptions.

For those weary of sifting through a never-ending list of job postings, there are a number of tools you can use to get jobs sent straight to you.

Sign up for a daily email with JobScribe to have an email with remote jobs delivered straight to your inbox. You can also try Working Nomads, a site that allows you to search through jobs or subscribe to an email service that will send you curated emails based on your job preferences.

If you are passionate about hitting the road, or the skies, and finding somewhere new to work, these are some resources to help you achieve it.

Let’s recap:

  1. Nomad List
  2. Remote OK
  3. Remotive
  4. We Work Remotely
  5. RemoteBase
  6. JobScribe
  7. Working Nomads
  8. Bonus: Remote Jobs Group

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Cope Notes: cheeky low-commitment mental health tool for all

(TECH NEWS) Mental health apps can be hard to find, harder to use, and even harder to remember without inundating, annoying alerts. Cope Notes is the perfect solution.

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I recently went searching for some mental health apps and it was a sea of garbage, if I’m being honest. I finally found a meditation app that was kind of cool, but after I figured out how it worked, I mostly spent time on videos of a gal cussing, but not for meditation value, but humor. I deleted the app.

I’m not in a dark place right now, but I work in a fast paced, high stress world, and maintaining focus and mental health is my competitive advantage, and one I take very seriously. But so many of the tools available are overpriced, overly complicated, or short on value.

About 12 hours after I had given up and decided to stick to my current regimen, without the help of any tech, a former Staff Writer reached out to update me on what he’s up to, and it was so timely… Cope Notes.

Put simply, it’s 20 randomly-timed text messages per month. You don’t know when they’re coming, but they’re exercises, encouragement, and witty advice. Finally, something that doesn’t put all of the work on me as a user.

And I’m not surprised – creator Johnny Crowder is young, but has long been a mental health advocate, and very sincere about it. He used to write here at AG in between tours and gigs as a famous straight-edge metal musician (I had no idea what that was prior to connecting with Crowder). He is a talented creative that has a lot of people looking up to him, so what better way to use that spotlight than for good?

“I just don’t want people to get so frustrated searching for solutions that they give up on healing altogether,” said Crowder. “It’s not clinical, it’s not complicated, it’s not confusing. It’s for people who feel great, people who feel rotten, and everyone in between.”

What we love about the creation of the app is that Crowder has suffered his own challenges, and instead of just complaining about an option he says he would have truly benefited from in his past, he took action.

Cope Notes is far different from any solution we’ve seen in that it speaks our language – cheeky, never condescending, and disarming, never douchey.

And because it’s done over text, it doesn’t require you to run an app in the background or remember to turn it back on, giving you a better chance at successfully using it (instead of forgetting which is my biggest fault).

“It took me years to find and hone the coping strategies that I rely on every day to keep me happy and healthy,” said Crowder. “Now that I finally figured out what works, I want to save people from the discouragement and disappointment of scrambling for solutions and fast-track their growth.” Every text is written by Crowder himself.

New users can enjoy a seven-day free trial by visiting copenotes.com/subscribe or texting COPE to 33222. After the trial period, subscribers pay $9.99 per month, with discounts applied to six-month and one-year subscriptions, and no set-up or cancellation fees.

The service also offers an option to purchase and personalize gift subscriptions for friends or family members in need, so check out Cope Notes today for you or a loved one.

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Why entrepreneurs are flocking to the pet technology space

(TECH) Pet technology is a burgeoning, $70B industry, but what makes it so attractive to entrepreneurs aside from kittens and puppers?

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According to science and/or math, the internet is fueled by pet pictures. We all love pictures of animals, but more than that, we love our actual tangible animals, and as a culture, we’ve used social media to do more than share – we’re all learning from each other about best practices and products.

We’ve noticed that the pet technology space is figuratively blowing up right now, so we asked Greg Tariff, Founder and CEO of Fetch my Pet why the industry’s blossoming in such a way.

In his own words below, Tariff effectively explains why entrepreneurs are making their way into the $70 billion industry:

This growth is driven in part by millennial consumers: about 75% in their 30s own a dog and about 50% own a cat—and 44% see their pets as “starter children.” In other words, millennials not only own more pets than any other generation, but offer a better standard of care and are changing the pet business landscape with their buying habits. Millennials think of pets as family.

It’s a great time for entrepreneurs to be making their way into the pet technology space. Studies show consumers are willing to pay more for higher quality food and pet products, and they are ready to engage in experiences with their pets. Now it’s up to pet brands to connect with these pet owners on a deeper level, and I believe technology can bridge that gap. Here’s how technology is improving pet ownership thanks to a number of new innovations and a shift in consumer trends:

Humans can interact with pets remotely. Marketed as “digital daycare for pets,” technology like PetChatz lets pet parents interact with their pets from outside of the home. The need for this type of technology is driven in part by our view of pets. We no longer see pets as owned objects, but rather members of our family. How we classify pets has a ripple effect on the pet ownership experience. Consumers are more willing to pay for high quality products and services, and businesses will have to offer the highest-quality experiences to retain customers. Plus there’s a market for technology like PetChatz that allows us to interact with our pets from a distance in real time.

Making pet life management simple for pet parents. Worldwide online sales of pet food increased from 6 to 14 percent in 2016, with sales of dog and cat food rising at least 14% in the U.S. alone. It’s very easy for pet owners to click to order food, find places to walk and play with their pets, and connect with other pet owners. For example, Fetch my Pet is learning about customers and their pet needs to make more contextual suggestions. If you have an 7-year-old Golden Retriever, your technology shouldn’t tell you to buy puppy food or puppy Chew toys. As pet life management technology continues to advance, the pet ownership experience will become more personalized and intuitive.

Artificial Intelligence enables predictive fulfillment. As more data is collected on pets and their habits via makers of the products and services consumed by pet parents, we will soon have the ability to embark on preventative pet healthcare and predictive fulfilment of products and services for our pets. What if Petco sent you a notification once they had a new sustainable dog food in stock because they knew you were low on kibble? We’re inching close to this reality.

Paving the way for brand and ingredient integrity. The more innovation that occurs in the pet space, the more selective consumers can be about what they purchase and why. We care very deeply about what we feed our pets. According to Purina, young adults are more likely than other groups to research foods when designing their pet’s diet, and they like to have options that include natural ingredients and real meat.

Companies like BareItAll Petfoods are taking food-sourcing one step further by selling food products made from Asian Carp, which threaten to harm waterways including the Great Lakes. Businesses are doing their part to get smarter about ingredient integrity – and consumers are being more selective.

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