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Hidden Google Chrome privacy issues you should know about

(Tech News) Google Chrome is well regarded as one of the best web browsers around, but not everything you do is as private as you may think.

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Two hidden privacy issues you need to know about

If you use Google Chrome, there are two privacy issues, regarding the deletion of your browsing history, you need to know about. Even though you think you have successfully removed all traces, there are two more issues are hiding, and while they were unveiled some time ago, many people remain unaware.

More than likely, you are currently using the following protocol to delete your history: Preferences-? Show advanced settings? Clear browsing data. A window with a series of checkboxes is displayed and you select the data you want erased and click the “clear browsing data” button, assuming your online footsteps have been erased. If this is your assumption, you will want to know about two instances where this is not true.

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The first issue relates to your use of the zoom function. Sometimes when visiting a website we zoom in to see an image better, or out to view a complete set of statistics, no big deal. But, when you use the zoom function, your browser remembers the zoom setting for each website, so it can apply it automatically the next time you visit.

While this may be helpful, it also creates a log of your online visits based on your zoom usage and this information is not deleted when you delete you browsing history in the aforementioned step. Currently, there does not seem to be a way to clear this data from the system, consider limiting your use of the zoom function to sites you do not mind people knowing you visit.

The second instance is in regards to DNS domains. DNS converts a domain name into an IP address, while DNS loading times vary greatly based on the network and server, Chrome’s browser “pre-fetches” the information to save you time.

For example, it will lookup the DNS and cache it to your user profile; so when you click on a link, the cached result is loaded rather than searching for the information each time. Just like the zoom function, this information is not deleted when you delete your browsing history. This can leave a rather large trail of information and websites visits. To clear the cache, navigate to chrome://net-internals/#dns.

Bottom line: do not rely on Chrome to fully erase any of your information, even in “Incognito” mode. Be aware of what sites you visit and know that clearing your history does not always remove your footprints.

Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Allen Mireles

    March 13, 2014 at 9:54 pm

    Jennifer, this is an excellent caution for all of us who use Chrome on a regular basis. I just really wonder…is there any realistic hope of privacy in today’s world? I think the short answer on that is no and that the world is only just coming to understand how public our every thought and action is. #1984anyone?

  2. Pingback: Software You Should Be Using | Waiting for the Barbarians

  3. dave beall

    December 16, 2016 at 3:32 am

    Thanks for the heads up on Googles Failures against it’s users. Sad state of affairs with google, maybe some day they will change to benefit the users, not the government and the anti-American corporations.

  4. John

    February 25, 2018 at 10:04 am

    Privacy and Google don’t go together. Chrome was created to enhanced Google’s collection of data from its users. It also works well sometimes exclusively on Google’s other services so Google has used Chrome to keep users in its ecosystem. We shouldn’t be surprised that many countries are very focused on Google’s lack of privacy and tend to impose fines and penalties on Google for this.

  5. Pingback: Why You Should Stop Using Google Chrome – DigitalPrivacyWise

  6. Pingback: Tri najve?e zablude o privatnosti na internetu | Talas.rs

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How to personalize your site for every visitor without learning code

(TECH NEWS) This awesome tool from Proof lets you personalize your website for visitors without coding. Experiences utilizes your users to create the perfect view for them.

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What if you could personalize every step of the sales funnel? The team over at Proof believes this is the next best step for businesses looking to drive leads online. Their tool, Experiences, is a marketer-friendly software that lets you personalize your website for every visitor without coding.

Using Experiences your team can create a targeted experience for the different types of visitors coming to your website. The personalization is thought to drive leads more efficiently because it offers visitors exactly the information they want. Experiences can also be used to A/B test different strategies for your website. This could be a game changer for companies that target multiple specific audiences.

Experiences is a drag-and-drop style tool, which means nearly anyone on your team can learn to use it. The UX is meant to be intuitive and simple, so you don’t need a web developer to guide you through the process. In order to build out audiences for your website, Experiences pulls data from your CRM, such as SalesForce and Hubspot, or you can utilize a Clearbit integration which pull third-party information.

Before you go rushing to purchase a new tool for your team, there are a few things to keep in mind. According to Proof, personalization is best suited for companies with at least 15,000 plus visitors per month. This volume of visitors is necessary for Experiences to gather the data it needs to make predictions. The tool is also recommended for B2B businesses since company data is public.

The Proof team is a success story of the Y Combinator demo day. They pitched their idea for a personalized web experience and quickly found themselves funded. Now, they’ve built out their software and have seen success with their initial clients. Over the past 18 months, their early-access clients, which included brands like Profitwell and Shipbob, have seen an increase in leads, proposals, and downloads.

Perhaps the best part of Proof is that they don’t just sell you a product and walk away. Their website offers helpful resources for customers called Playbooks where you can learn how to best use the tool to achieve your company’s goals be it converting leads or engaging with your audience. If this sounds like exactly the tool your team needs, you can request a demo on their website.

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Not just for gaming: How virtual reality can save PTSD patients

(TECH NEWS) Thanks to its ability to simulate situations safely, virtual reality technologies are proving effective in therapy for PTSD patients.

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Woman wearing a VR headset in warm sunny lighting, PTSD patients treatment

Over the last year, a great many people have developed a new and sometimes dangerous relationship with a new emotional state, anxiety. I know that personally I’d never had a panic attack in my life until the middle of the pandemic. For many these emotions have taken the form of actual disorders. Actual mental influences which affect everyday life on a large scale. One of the most common forms of which is PTSD.

This disorder has many different aspects and can affect people in a number of different and debilitating ways. Finding treatments for PTSD patients and other anxiety disorders – especially treatments that don’t involve drugging people into oblivion has been difficult.

A lot of these disorders require exposure therapy. Putting people back into similar situations which caused the original trauma so that their brains can adjust to the situation and not get stuck in pain or panic loops. But how do you do that for things like battlefield trauma. You can’t just create situations with gunfire and dead bodies! Or can you?

This is where VR starts coming in. Thanks to the falling cost of VR headsets, noted by The Economist, psychologists are more capable of creating these real world situations that can actually help people adjust to their individual trauma.

One therapist went so far as to compare it to easy access opioids for therapy. This tool is so powerful that of the 20 veterans that they started with, 16 of them no longer qualify for the categories of PTSD. That’s a 75% success rate with an over-the-counter medicine. I can think of antihistamines and painkillers that aren’t that good.

I’ve grown up around PTSD patients. The majority of my family have been in the military. I was even looking at a career before I was denied service. I have enough friends that deal with PTSD issues that I have a list of things I remember not to invite certain people to so as not to trigger it. Any and every tool available that could help people adapt to their trauma is worthwhile.

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Tired of email spam? This silly, petty solution might provide vindication

(TECH NEWS) If you struggle to keep your inbox clean thanks to a multitude of emails, the widget “You’ve Got Spam” could provide some petty catharsis.

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Email icon with 20 possible spam emails on phone screen.

We’re all spending a lot of time behind our computers and inside of our inboxes these days, so it makes sense that some people—not naming names—might be sick of seeing several unsolicited emails a day from marketers and other unsavory businesses.

While we can’t recommend a mature, adult solution that hasn’t already been beaten to death (looking at you, “inbox zero” crowd), we can recommend a childish one: Signing solicitors up for spam.

If you do decide to go the petty route, “You’ve Got Spam”—a free email widget from MSCHF—has you covered. Upon installing the widget, you can configure it to respond automatically to incoming cold-marketing emails with tons of subscriptions to spam sources, thus resulting in overwhelming the sender with a crowded inbox and cultivating a potentially misplaced sense of catharsis for yourself.

The widget itself is fairly simple: You only need to install it to Gmail from the MSCHF website. The rest is pretty self-explanatory. When you receive an email from a person from whom you can safely assume you’ll never be receiving favors ever again, you can open it and click the “You’ve Got Spam” icon to sign the sender up for spam lists galore.

See? Petty, but effective.

The developer page does fail to make the distinction between the promised “100” subscriptions and the “hundreds of spam subscriptions” discussed on Product Hunt. But one can assume that anyone who dares trespass on the sacred grounds of your squeaky-clean inbox will rue the day they did so regardless of the exact number of cat litter magazine subscriptions they receive.

Of course, actually using something like “You’ve Got Spam” is, realistically, a poor choice. It takes exactly as much effort to type, “We’ll pass – thanks!” as a response to anyone cold-emailing you, and you’re substantially less likely to piss off the actual human being on the other side by doing so. Services like this are heavy on the comedic shock value, but the empathy side tends to lack a discernible presence.

That said, if you absolutely must wreck someone’s day—and inbox—MSCHF’s “You’ve Got Spam” is a pretty ingenious way to do it.

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