Connect with us

Should You Care About Your Site PageRank™?



Link structure illustrating the passing of PageRankFirst of all, let’s clear an oft-confused difference between true PageRank (PR) and what most folks are familiar with: toolbar PageRank (tPR).

It’s impossible to know your actual PageRank. Your actual PageRank is a numerical weight assigned to the varying pages of your website. What you’re probably used to seeing (and maybe talking about) is toolbar Page Rank (tPR). That is the number you see on Google’s toolbar and until recently also in Google Webmaster Tools. tPR is expressed as any of the numbers from 0 to 10 and is “derived from a theoretical probability value on a logarithmic scale like the Richter Scale.”1

PageRank is updated constantly by Google as they make changes to their algorithms and the natural linking of the web changes. Toolbar PageRank is the whole number representation of actual PageRank, however, it is updated infrequently. As of the writing of this post, the last update of tPR was April 3, 2010. It’s now mid-August.

So, should I care?

In short, yes. Obviously PageRank is one of Google’s valuations of your web property and as such, you should care to nurture and build your PageRank with Google. Otherwise, why would you be reading SEO articles on AgentGenius?

However, as mentioned above, the only way you can guess at your PR is to know what your tPR is. And since it is updated only a few times a year at most and based on an unknown past point, my advice is, don’t dwell on your tPR number. It will fluctuate with Google’s algorithms and you have no way of knowing what your current, true PR is at any given moment.

A web page or site does not have to have tPR to rank in Google. « Understand this! Why you ask? PR is only one of the many many factors Google uses in their ranking algorithm(s).

Does Google have anything to say about tPR?

Why yes, yes they do-

We’ve been telling people for a long time that they shouldn’t focus on PageRank so much; many site owners seem to think it’s the most important metric for them to track, which is simply not true.
Susan Moskwa, Google

And that my friends, is the final word.

1 Wikipedia: PageRank

Marty Martin is an accomplished SEM/SEO anti-consultant with a broad range of experience working for a wide variety of clientele including colleges and universities, regional and state tourism, government and business. An advocate for business, Marty works hard to share accurate information in a world suddenly overrun with "social media consultants."

Continue Reading


  1. Fred Romano

    August 16, 2010 at 10:26 am

    I just wish Google would update that PR in the toolbar more often, like maybe once a month! That way they wouldn’t keep everyone guessing 🙂 — I love Google though

    • Outsourcing Philippines

      August 17, 2010 at 7:28 pm

      Thumbs up to you, Fred! 🙂

  2. Property Marbella

    August 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

    Hi Marty,
    Don’t take to hard on the PR, but every website needs in-links. If you want blogs or forums comments links to your site, so gives PR you a good hint of the quality of the site. Of course is Do-follow or No-follow more important when you choose blogs and forums.

  3. Joe Ginsberg, CCIM

    August 18, 2010 at 1:54 pm

    In bound links, page rank, key words and FRESH CONTENT… all very important for the growth of your traffic.

  4. Dave Chomitz

    August 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    I’m certainly no expert, but I question why the average Realtor would be concerned at all about PR. I question the wisdom and ROI (it’ll be considerable “I”) trying to out rank the big players and established sites to get organic traffic that converts about 3% of the time.

    From here it looks like there should be better ways and places to focus for better results.

    Just sayin ……. Cheers


    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:34 am

      Thanks for the comment Dave. I would think most agents reading AG aren’t your “average” REALTOR. 😉 At least not yet. Most, if not all, of the agents I’ve encountered on AG are pretty forward thinking.

      But to address your question, the average agent shouldn’t be concerned about their PR, nor the above average agent. If you follow the SEO advice and best practices dolled out here, your site will be just fine without ever considering your PR (or tPR). 😉


  5. Phil Boren

    August 18, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Marty: I didn’t even know about (tPR), so I guess I was unaware what I should be caring about! What’s interesting to me is that I’ll have pages at that rank pretty well, then I’ll post something on my integrated blog or update content (which Google values, I thought), and the PR will drop. Thanks for the info.

    • Marty Martin

      August 19, 2010 at 8:35 am

      Hi Phil,

      As the big G updates their algorithms, etc. PR (and tPR) ebbs and flows. Another reason not to worry about it. As long as the search engines are sending you traffic you are optimizing for, you’re probably doing fine. I have pages with no PR at all that send me traffic. 🙂

  6. James Chai

    August 18, 2010 at 10:57 pm

    The statement from the Google Rep (above) says it all. There are lots of varying metrics one should look for but there is NOT an end all say to SEO. It constantly evolves and the tools we use to measure ourselves by will continually change as well.

  7. Tauranga Real Estate

    August 20, 2010 at 3:13 am

    Every agent should have a website and be concerned about page rank, especially in these tough times. The Real Estate Institute of New Zealand said on Friday that total house sales in New Zealand declined last month, while house prices also fell.

    A total of 4,411 homes were sold in the country in July – down from the 4,575 sold in June but still higher than the record low of only 3,666 sales last January. This marks the lowest residential sales turnover for a July month in ten years.

  8. SmartVestors Realty

    August 22, 2010 at 6:05 am

    I really dont care on page rank, but what matters how you serve your customers with their actual requirements, thats all about the recurrent visitation.

    SmartVestors Realty

  9. Roberto Mazzoni

    October 29, 2010 at 2:40 am

    I have been keeping a blog for a couple of years now and recently I had slowed down my updates and noted that my page rank had plummeted. Now I have resumed publishing and I didn’t see an immediate change. This article has gotten me to understand that there a time delay on the process and that consistency of updates is key, as always 🙂

  10. Max Boyko - Team Hybrid

    December 18, 2010 at 7:39 pm

    Everything you can do to convert more clients these days should be used for any agent (especially the forward thinking ones). Someone mentioned why bother when you only get a 3% conversion rate… ummmm hello? You don’t want to make an extra $100k+ per year?

    30 visitors a day = 900 visitors/month
    3% conversion = 27 leads/month
    10% closing rate = 2.7 clients/month = 32 deals/year

    Depending of course where you are located will make a difference, but I think it’s safe to say $3,000 commission per deal is pretty conservative. Definitely makes it something to explore to say the least. Good luck 🙂

  11. Ryan

    November 27, 2015 at 4:55 am

    I never really cared too much about my own page rank, its the quality of links. Actual editorial links and mentions from websites that have a good PR are best. and Quality not quantity

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Opinion Editorials

How top performers work smarter, not harder

(EDITORIAL) People at the top of their game work less, but with more focus – learn how to replicate their good habits to get ahead.



working smarter

Practice, practice and more practice will get you to be more competent in what you do, but working smarter isn’t always about competency, at least in business. Productivity expert, Morten T. Hansen’s studies indicate that multitasking is detrimental to working smarter. But it’s only half of the problem.

Hansen discovered that the top performers did not try to do thousands of things at a time. He’s not the only one.

Earl Miller, an MIT neuroscientist outlines why humans cannot multitask. As he puts it, “our brains… delude us into thinking we can do more.” But this is an illusion. When we interrupt the creative process, it takes time to get refocused to be creative and innovative. It’s better to focus on one project for a set amount of time, take a break, then get started on another project.

Hansen also found in his research that the top performers focused on fewer goals. He recommends cutting everything in the day that isn’t producing value. As a small business owner, you have to look at which tasks bring in the most profit. This might mean that you outsource the bookkeeping that takes you hours or give up being on a committee at the Chamber of Commerce that is taking too much time away from your business.

Taking on less work will help you work smarter, but Hansen found that it goes hand-in-hand with obsessing over what you do have to do.

When you have fewer burning fires, you can dedicate your time to these tasks to create quality work. According to Hansen, this one thing took middle performers at the 50th percentile and put them into the 75th percentile. When someone is competent in writing reports, for example, and can focus their energy into that, the work is much better.

Top performers also take breaks to rest their brains. One of my favorite analogies is the one where a lumberjack is given a stack of wood that needs to be cut down. He starts with a sharp ax, but over time, as the ax gets dull it becomes harder to chop the wood. By taking a break and sharpening the ax, more gets accomplished with less effort.

Your brain is like that ax. It works great when you first get to work. You’re excited to get started. In a couple of hours, your brain needs a break. Go outside and take a walk. Get away from your desk. Do something different for 15 minutes. When you come back, you should feel like you have a second jolt of energy to take on tasks until you break for lunch. Science backs the need for breaks during the day.

By taking breaks, obsessing over what you have to do, and laser focusing on fewer goals, you’ll be outperforming your competitors (and even coworkers). Work smarter, not harder.

Continue Reading

Opinion Editorials

The real key to working smarter, not harder

(EDITORIAL) We’ve all heard that we should be working harder, not smarter, but how does one go about doing that aside from a bunch of apps?



working smarter, not working harder

I know you’ve heard the phrase, “work smarter, not harder,” but what does that mean exactly? How do you work smarter?

A new book by Morten T. Hansen attempts to answer the question. “Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More” was released at the end of January. Hansen found 7 different behaviors outside of education levels, age and number of hours worked. I’d like to take a look at a couple of the things he recommends. Read the book if you want to know more.

Let’s continue on by addressing the 10,000 Hour Theory of Expertise. Under this principle, it’s thought that if you spend 10,000 hours in deliberate practice of a skill, you’ll become world-class in any field. The Beatles are thought to have used this theory to become one of the greatest bands in history. But it’s not just about practicing until your fingers bleed or you can’t stay awake any longer, it’s really about pushing yourself in an area.

Although it has been argued that this theory doesn’t necessarily apply in business or professions, there’s something to be said about deliberate practice.

When it comes to working smarter, no, you don’t need to spend 10,000 hours in the workplace to get better at your job. But you can put some of the principles of the theory in action:

  • Pick a skill that you need to develop. There’s no way you can work on every skill at the same time. Just choose one to focus on for three months, or six months. Review your performance now. Have a benchmark of where you want to take that skill.
  • Carve out time to work on that skill. Spend 15 minutes a day doing something that helps you get better. You know the old joke? How do you get to Carnegie Hall? “Practice.” You’re going to have to find ways to practice.
  • Work on specific elements of a skill. Typically, the skills we want to improve involve a lot of smaller things. Take a good presentation. You need connect with people, have a good outline and learn to have diction and tons of other things. Work on one thing at a time. ?I used to have a real problem with looking at people when I was giving a presentation. For quite a few months, I made it a priority to be conscious of making eye contact. No matter who I was talking to, the cashier, a patron at the center where I volunteer and even my neighbors. It’s much easier now for me.
  • Get feedback. You may believe you’re making progress, but others may have a different vantage point. Find a couple of good mentors who can really evaluate your performance and offer constructive criticism.

Repeat until your skill-set grows.

To get better, you need challenge and practice. Believe me, you’re going to make some mistakes along the way. Get up, dust yourself off and keep practicing.

Competence in a particular area goes a long way toward working smarter.

But wait, there’s more – the discussion continues in part two of this series, keep reading!

Continue Reading

Social Media

How to quickly make your LinkedIn profile stand out from the masses

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Most of us have a love/hate relationship with LinkedIn, but no matter your feelings, you should be the one who stands out in a crowd – here’s how.




Your LinkedIn is your brand. That’s it. Whether you are job hunting (or people are hunting you), or are showing off your business, insight, acumen, or simply networking; your profile on LinkedIn needs to stay appealing and not drive potential headhunters, bosses, clients, or networking groups bananas.

Let’s start with a three part list of what you MUST do, what you SHOULD do, and what you COULD do.

Here’s what you MUST DO (as in, do it now).

  1. Get a #GREAT LinkedIn photo. Nothing sells you like the right profile picture. No selfies. No mountain biking. Get a professional headshot. Don’t lie about your age. Wear what you wear when you’re on the job. Smile. People are visual.
  2. Simplify your profile. Cut the buzzwords. Cut out excess skills that don’t add to your vision or that don’t represent the kind of job you want. (i.e. most of us can use Outlook but few of us need to mention that skill because we don’t support Outlook). Focus on the skills that are important.
  3. Keep it current. Your LinkedIn should reflect your career and current responsibilities. Update the description. Add new projects. Change your groups as you change in your career and move towards new levels. Indicate when you receive a promotion.
  4. Extra, Extra! Headlines. Don’t use something lame for your headline. How would you want to catch a headhunter to look at you if you could only say 10 words? Make it standout. There are thousands of managers – but only one you.
  5. Custom URL. Just do it. Pick your own URL. It’s FREEEEEEE.
  6. Get the app. Make LinkedIn a part of your mobile life and check it more often than you do Snapchat.

Here’s what you SHOULD DO (Set aside some time at Starbucks and go do this in the next month).

  1. Tell your story. Your summary should bring to live the content of your career. Don’t leave that section blank. Spend some time crafting a cool story. Run it by your professional mentor. Send it to your English major friends.
  2. Connect. Add colleagues. Add partners from other organizations. Use connections to broaden your network. Synch your profile with your address book. Add people after a conference.
  3. Endorse your connections. Identify people you’ve worked with and give them the endorsements – which can get them to come endorse you!
  4. Ask for recommendations. Ask a colleague, partner, or manager to write you a recommendation to help advertise your skills.
  5. Add a nice cover photo. Again, visual people. Some more on that here.

Here’s what you COULD DO (If you’re feeling dedicated, what you can do to give yourself an extra edge.)

  1. Share your media. Upload presentations, videos, speeches, or projects that you can share. (Don’t violate company policy though!).
  2. Publish original content. LinkedIn has a vibrant publishing feature and sharing your original work (or content you’ve published elsewhere) is a great way to share your voice.
  3. Post status updates. Share your reactions. Share articles. Repost from influencers. Be active and keep your feed vibrant.

That’s a quick list to get started. So go start your LinkedIn makeover (and I’ll go do the same). Let’s get connected!

Continue Reading

American Genius
News neatly in your inbox

Join thousands of AG fans and SUBSCRIBE to get business and tech news updates, breaking stories, and MORE!

Emerging Stories