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Using tie-down phrases to close more deals

Want to close more deals? Change your wording to elicit “yes” responses by using tie-down phrases.

tie down phrases

tie down phrases

Increasing your success rate

Do you ever fear that you sound like Charlie Brown’s teacher when trying to close a deal – like the person on the other end has no interest in deciphering your nonsensical gibberish? As a businessperson, it’s normal to have a spiel to reel in prospects, but if your wording is passive and doesn’t engage with the listener, they’re more likely to tune you out and get lost in their own thoughts. One way to increase your success rate during a pitch is by using tie down phrases.

A tie down phrase is normally fashioned in the form of a question and is used to elicit a response from the listener. By turning a statement into a question, the speaker is able to invoke acknowledgement from the client and hear their opinions on things rather than spending an hour reciting a bunch of information to this person while their eyes glaze over.

For example, if you’re a Realtor showing a house to a married couple with children, and you want to draw attention to a picturesque window, rather than stating: “This window is great. You can see the whole backyard from here,” a better way to start the conversation would be to ask, “Wouldn’t it be great to look out of this huge window and see your kids playing there – that would make such a great memory wouldn’t it?”

Getting the response you’re looking for

The first statement is likely to receive no response as the person is probably thinking about where they’re going to go for lunch later. The question with the tie down phrase could also not get a response, but the person would look foolish if you ask a question and they remain silent. It’s more likely to get an emphatic yes and the client may even launch into a story about how their parents use to watch them from the window during their childhood.

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In another instance you may say: “This condo is a property that’s been well maintained and will alleviate the stress of doing any handiwork yourself. Wouldn’t that be great if you didn’t have to worry about doing any repairs?”

Your client is likely to nod their head in agreement or say yes – because after all, who would want to be obligated to fix a housing disaster?

By emphasizing aspects that people can relate to in a tie down phrase that elicits a “yes” from your client, you develop a sense of camaraderie with that person and can leverage that positivity to close the deal. Eliciting involvement from your client and nudging them to provide input to the conversation increases the level of interactivity and maintains their interest in what you’re talking about.

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Destiny Bennett is a journalist who has earned double communications' degrees in Journalism and Public Relations, as well as a certification in Business from The University of Texas at Austin. She has written stories for AustinWoman Magazine as well as various University of Texas publications and enjoys the art of telling a story. Her interests include finance, technology, social media...and watching HGTV religiously.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. JasonBlackburn

    August 24, 2012 at 12:09 pm

    Tie down questions are great but are too often overused and ask for answers to questions that are not really important to the client. An agent may get them involved, but it also may annoy them and the next weekend they are looking at houses with another agent. Tie down questions became popular when Tom Hopkins wrote his real estate book back in the late 70s, and many trainers still teach the technique without updating when and how to best use them. A better way is to use a technique called MEMO with tie down questions. MEMO = Mention Early, Mention Often. So once I discover a buyer’s dominant buying motive (DBMs = Pride, Profit, Love, Need, or Fear) I mention what features of the homes we are viewing meet their primary and secondary DBM and then use a simple tie down to ascertain if that feature indeed satisfies their want or need. For instance, a buyer is moving because they recently got a promotion and can afford to move up, in talking to the buyers I ask them if there was one room in their current house they could blow up, what would it be, and they respond the kitchen and dining room, because they have always wanted to host dinner parties and family gatherings in a place large enough and nice enough to impress their friends and to annoy the sister that has hogged all the Thanksgiving dinners. I now know what feature of the layout is most important to the buyers and what their primary DBM is – Pride. Now I can structure my tie down questions to demonstrating, validating, and gaining agreement that a home meets their satisfies their primary DBM Using MEMO and ties downs. For instance, ” Folks, one of the main reasons I wanted to show you this home was because while many homes meet all of your basic wants and needs, this home a special kitchen and dining room. They are perfect for entertaining large groups for formal and informal gatherings, and with the bay windows and the sliding door leading out to the deck, all your guests cannot only be envious of the home, but also the view you get to enjoy everyday. I think this is home that can get your family over here next Thanksgiving. What do you think would be their reaction?” 

  2. BlueFernRE

    August 29, 2012 at 10:40 pm

    great post! 
     
     @BlueFernRE    
    https://bit.ly/bluefernblog

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