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5 ways agents can become more organized and in control

With better organization comes more productivity which leads to more income, and with a detail oriented career like real estate, it can be overwhelming. Here are five tips for improving your organization skills.

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Interested in becoming more organized, proactive, and in-control of your business? After all, real estate can be hectic. These five tips will help you get a grip on the disorganization and chaos in your everyday life.

1. Manage your active business

Use a CRM for REALTORS® to manage and organize your listings and the buyers you’re currently working with. In one place, you should be able to see all the listings you have at the moment and details about that listing such current status, property details, asking price, commission rates, contingency dates, related parties, and more.

What’s more, if you’re working with a number of buyers at once, it helps to view at a glance who these buyers are and their requirements. When it comes to listings and the buyers you’re working with, you don’t (and shouldn’t) have to rely on your memory.

2. Reminders and to-dos

It’s important to ensure you’re maintaining contact and building relationships with past clients and your sphere of influence (SOI). Top real estate coaches and trainers suggest that you make quarterly keep in touch calls, send out direct mail pieces, do some email marketing, and plan periodic events such as client appreciation nights.

You can schedule, plan, and organize everything you’re doing to keep in touch with your real estate database right from your CRM. And then you can set reminders so you’ll know what to do and when you need to do it. And that’s not all. Have an appointment with a prospect? Meeting with a client next week? Need to prepare paperwork? Set reminders in your CRM so you don’t forget. Tip: a good CRM will include the option to send yourself email reminders.

3. Calendar and task list

Organized agents log into their Realtor CRM on a daily basis to check their calendar and task list. This lets them immediately see the appointments they have for the day and what tasks need to be accomplished.

And as you complete various tasks, make sure you check them off of your list. This serves two purposes. First, it helps you keep track of your progress and be aware of where you stand work-wise. Second, it “feels good” to check off items on a “to do” list. If you’re feeling overwhelmed or discouraged, you can look at your task list and see just how much you’ve accomplished.

4. Listing and closing activity plans

It’s easy for things to fall through the cracks, especially when it comes to details pertaining to listing and closing a home. Listing and closing Activity Plans will help you manage and remember the steps involved in these processes. By assigning a listing or closing Activity Plan, all the things you need to do to move a listing or closing forward automatically appear in your task list and calendar, and as email alerts if you so choose.

5. Drip marketing plans

From a sales perspective, it would be great to be able to call every single person in your real estate database regularly and send them ongoing direct mail. These things are fantastic relationship-builders and often help with getting more referrals and repeat business. But in reality, calling and mailing everyone isn’t too feasible from a cost and time standpoint. For your best clients or “A-List,” it is possible and should be done.

But what should you do to keep in touch and build relationships with everyone else in your database? This is where drip marketing comes in. Email is cost effective and takes up very little of your time. That’s why you need to be regularly emailing everyone in your SOI. A good CRM for Realtors will come with automated drip email campaigns for different types of contacts. You would simply select the marketing campaign that works best, and assign the contact(s) to it. The beauty of drip campaigns is that emails automatically go out (or “drip” out) at various points in time, which means that while you’re showing a client a home, you’re also marketing to a lead or keeping in contact with a past client at the same time.

The takeaway

Put into practice the suggestions above. You’ll find that they’ll work wonders increasing your day-to-day organization. And when you’re more organized, you’ll be able to perform your job better and project a more professional image.

Matthew Collis is part of the Sales and Marketing Team at IXACT Contact Solutions Inc., a leading North American real estate CRM firm. In addition to overseeing many of IXACT Contact’s key sales and marketing programs, Matthew works with REALTORS® to help them achieve their real estate goals through effective contact management and relationship marketing. IXACT Contact is a web-based real estate contact management and marketing system that helps REALTORS® better manage and grow their business. The system includes powerful email marketing capabilities and a professionally designed and written monthly e-Newsletter.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. virtual office

    October 4, 2012 at 4:49 am

    Great post! Sorting your things out of your busy schedule may help you become more productive.

  2. Pingback: Real Estate CRM| IXACT Contact – Nicety Homes

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Business News

80 reasons why you didn’t get the job interview or offer (brutally honest)

(BUSINESS NEWS) An interview is stressful and getting a good job offer can be life-altering, but remember that you can only control what you can control.

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The reasons are infinite

Job hunting is one of the most stressful periods in a person’s life, right up there with a death in the family, divorce, and illness. There’s so much at stake, and it can be frustrating. In Austin, where we’re headquartered, we operate a popular tech job group where the most universal question is “why didn’t I get the job??”

In almost all cases, you’ll never really know why.

Sorry. That’s disheartening, but it’s true. The positive side is that it isn’t always your fault. So, we’ve crafted a massive list of reasons you didn’t get the job interview or job offer that you can learn from if you read from top to bottom (we promise this isn’t the same old garbage you already know).

Don’t let this list get you nervous, the idea is that there are infinitely complex numbers of reasons humans reject each other, many of which can’t be helped. Remember, the hiring person has a lot at stake, so does the employer (it costs a lot to hire, onboard, and retain employees), not just you.

The hiring process can be inhuman and indignant and your resume goes into a black hole or you never get feedback after a phone or in-person interview, but arm yourself with as much knowledge about the process and avoid as many objections as possible. We’re pulling for you!

Job hunting or career refining?

It’s the robot’s fault

1. Did you know that if you apply online that your resume goes through an applicant tracking system (ATS)? And if your resume didn’t match the job description (meaning none of the keywords they were looking for were used), the robots didn’t even give your resume to their HR human? Pay attention to job descriptions and tailor your resume to each application accordingly.

2. Sometimes the applicant tracking system (ATS) where you sent your application online kicked out a rejection letter without the hiring manager knowing. It happens.

3. You put your resume on one generic job search site that promises to send it to hundreds of employers (but is really just there to sell your information to third parties). At no point did you apply directly, through a third party recruiter, across various platforms, and so forth. Applying on some of the junk job search sites is not always applying (we don’t mean Indeed or Dice or reputable brands, but the “apply once to a trillion random jobs” platforms – be cynical).

It’s the hiring manager’s fault

4. Sometimes it really isn’t your fault, the recruiter or hiring manager is imperfect. That’s harsh, but you can’t guarantee that person will be perceptive or even professional. The overwhelming majority are really insanely good at their job, but they’re humans too, thus they’re fallible.

5. The hiring manager is petty and/or shallow and didn’t like the school you went to or the purse you were carrying or the car you pulled up in. You’ll never know you received a secret demerit.

It’s the company’s fault

6. Sometimes the company changes the job specifications in the middle of the process.

7. The company might have changed in the middle of the process. Maybe the CEO is on the way out. Or there’s a temporary hiring freeze, but they can’t say that in public. Or their funding status is changing. Or the business just took a big hit and everyone’s scrambling.

8. They were never hiring to begin with and were using candidates for marketing ideas or free labor. It’s a sick practice that some companies commit.

9. Someone that no longer works there told you to start as a contractor and they’d consider you FT after 90 days, but it was never in writing and no one knows what you’re talking about and your contract is up and it’s not going to be renewed. You didn’t really get the job, amigo.

10. Your interview with the Chief Hug Officer about how many stars you give yourself as a leader wasn’t the appropriate number of stars and they didn’t want to hug you after all. Or your phone interview with the 18 year old social media intern where you couldn’t name any Marvel characters rubbed them the wrong way. Companies have unique interviewing methods that involve humans, and some are just plain silly.

11. The company’s not willing to accept your type of Visa or citizenship status.

It’s timing’s fault

12. There was a candidate interviewed before you applied that they really like and are waiting for an offer acceptance from. And now they have said yes and you’re out and sad, and I’m sorry.

13. Someone else took precedent (an internal hire, an ex-colleague, or someone the CEO said they know and is the new hire no matter what).

It’s someone else’s fault

14. Someone unexpectedly gave you a bad reference and you may never know about it.

It’s your fault

15. Let’s start with the obvious repetitive junk you already know – you have a bad resume or cover letter. There are red flags, incomplete information, grammar errors, it is too long or to short, super generic, and/or never expressed how you impacted any company’s bottom line.

16. You couldn’t answer basic questions (“why did you leave your last job?” or “why were you only at X place for 3 months?”). Or you answered any number of interview questions poorly. Or you were asked to critique something about the company and you wailed on their shortcomings rather than offer a positive, followed by a meaningful critique with actionables, closed with a positive.

17. You made a mistake on your application (you worked at Google from 1904-2006?) or you straight up lied. Some companies do basic employment checks prior to requesting an interview, so you better get your story straight from minute one.

18. You applied for the wrong jobs – you read too quickly and you’re a Java developer who just applied to a JavaScript role. Oops. Or the ad says you must have three years of Salesforce experience and you missed that part and while you fit everything else, you have zero years with that platform. You wasted everyone’s time.

19. You’re not a culture fit. But wait, it’s not what you think – you’re not unlikable, they’re just looking for a puzzle piece. Their division might be in chaos or the there’s already an A-type on the small team. Hiring managers deal with truly complex situations and it isn’t personal if you’re not the right puzzle piece, despite your incredible pedigree.

20. You raised major legal red flags. Nothing says you plan to sue like vaguely saying “I have schizophrenia, is that going to be a problem?” or “I’m not sure working for a male boss is a good fit, do you have someone I can answer to that is female?” or “what is your policy on sex in the workplace?”

21. Speaking of legal red flags, you put your picture on your resume which tells sensitive employers “I’m doing this so later I can say I didn’t get the job because of my [gender, race, etc.]” Discrimination is no joke. It happens, and you don’t want to put an employer in an uncomfortable situation – your picture’s already on LinkedIn. That suffices.

22. To “where do you see yourself in five years?” You said “in your job” to be clever or “President of the company” without explanation. Come on, people. How you answer that demonstrates your intent on longevity in the company, your willingness to move up, your desire to be a leader, not supplant your interviewer.

23. You applied to basically every role in the company and now they take you seriously for none.

24. You applied for a Senior-level role when you’re barely entry-level.

25. You asked nothing about the company or role during the interview. This is sadly common and so easy to fix.

26. You knew nothing about the company during the interview. Do your research, people.

27. You failed a required technical test or psych profile and there really is no coming back from that. Objective requirements are just that – objective.

28. Your work history is unstable, too short to be applicable, and/or filled with holes you can’t (or didn’t) properly explain.

29. You’re missing a certification or education level the employer wants (either publicly or secretly).

30. You’re too educated – your PhD is scaring them into thinking your salary demands might rapidly increase even if you’re currently amenable to minimum wage. This is based on endless studies and experiences of people settling – they don’t stick around for long.

31. You forgot to include your continuing education (coding courses, professional leadership retreats) because you thought they were irrelevant. They’re not – they show that you take initiative and eager to always learn more.

32. You ghosted at some point or were slow to respond.

33. You arrived (or called) way too early or way too late.

34. You were rude to the receptionist.

35. You were overly familiar during the interview because you’ve done so much research and feel like you know the company so well. This trait says you’ll be an unruly team member and will likely disqualify you. Be a pro, even if you know the hiring manager personally – anything else is disrespectful.

36. Someone random in the company met you at a networking event 10 years ago and when politics came up you called them a moron. They didn’t forget, and you’ll never know it was even a factor. But it might have been.

37. You briefly dated the hiring manager’s dramatic best friend and over drinks, you come up and she tells horror stories about you – you’ll never learn this was the reason, but seriously, it’s possible.

38. You were sweaty (if that’s a problem, wear a sweat-wicking shirt under your top).

39. You had a smell – either body odor or too much perfume/cologne/axe deodorant.

40. You had a limp or overly aggressive handshake – some people are really sensitive to that and you may culturally offend someone.

41. You looked at (or stared at) your phone during an interview when it wasn’t ringing. Or your smartwatch.

42. You weren’t memorable – some people are just boring or try to be overly calm. Remember you’re connecting with another non-robot human, so try to be at least human.

43. Your desperation permeated the entire process. They could smell it on you and it wasn’t appealing. Why? Because they know you’re going to take the job so you can pay rent, but you’ll still be job hunting and they’ll lose you quickly, so why bother?

44. You live in the wrong place – they may be unwilling to pay for relocation and may screen accordingly.

45. Salary negotiations went awry. They demanded your previous salary and you refused or they didn’t like the number or you’d done too little or too much salary research, or maybe the job listing said a range and you demanded triple (or they offered less than the range).

46. You asked questions at the wrong time – don’t lead with “so what are the benefits and how much time do I get off?” Wait until you know that they like you already. Asking pay as the first question, although the most important, can disqualify you. This is a delicate dance.

47. You failed some simple (probably stupid) test like a sales role being offered half salary and being tricked into negotiating their way up, or somewhere on the job listing it asked you to “Like” their page on Facebook and you didn’t, who knows?

48. You dressed poorly at the interview or were way overdressed.

49. When asked if you’re a night person or morning person, you didn’t say you’re flexible, you said you’re terrible at mornings, and now this company that is really serious about productivity starting at 8:00am, is no longer interested in you.

50. You fidgeted or shook during the interview.

51. You were awkward during the interview, maybe you held your bag in your lap or kept your winter coat on.

52. Your nerves got the best of you – you spoke too quickly or quietly or couldn’t stop saying “like” or “umm.”

SIDENOTE: Being introverted or socially anxious is a challenge, so during an interview, gently express that so it’s not misinterpreted. “I do tend to be introverted, but I want you to know that I am enthusiastic about this opportunity even if I sound a little shaky and nervous.”

53. You didn’t thank the interviewer (or act interested) at any point.

54. You sent an extravagant thank you gift to the hiring manager that disqualified you as it appeared to be a bribe, not the kind gesture you meant for it to be.

55. You followed up too soon and too frequently.

56. You were too cocky or too insecure.

57. You were too eager and it came across as insincere.

58. Your body language was off (you used practiced/disingenuous hand steepling, or you slouched, or maybe you couldn’t make eye contact).

59. You were too scripted – you obviously regurgitated scripts you studied online (a good HR pro can see right through that – they’ve read them, too).

60. You sneezed into your hand and wiped it on your pants, then offered it to shake at adios time. Gross, bye.

61. You trash talked a former employer or coworker (or the interviewer’s favorite sports team, or their religion, or them).

62. You didn’t laugh at the CEO’s joke during a final interview.

63. You shared way too much personal info – not stories about vacay to humanize yourself, but like made sure they knew you have irritable bowel syndrome.

64. You were overly apologetic about your past rather than calmly explaining that you took five years off to be a stay at home parent, but you’ve kept your skills sharp by studying [X].

65. You kept talking about why their competitor is awesome.

66. You accidentally called them by their hated competitor’s name during an interview.

67. You kept calling the interviewer “Jacob,” but his name was always “Jason” and now he thinks you can’t tend to standard details (or is just butthurt).

68. You’re trying to pivot from one industry to another and you do a poor job of explaining that in any way, you just hoped you’d get an interview (but it doesn’t work that way).

69. You’re painfully ugly or overly hot. Sorry, it’s possible.

70. You’re overqualified and that means you might leave when a sexier offer comes along.

71. You’re underqualified which means they’ll have to pay for your learning curve (which they won’t).

72. Your credit is awful and you’re applying to a highly regulated industry like finance or law enforcement, which may hold you back.

73. You didn’t know that your criminal or credit history might not be a disqualifier so you didn’t even try. Sometimes companies are open to certain types of offenses, or you can explain the illness in the family that destroyed your credit.

74. You failed a drug test – this is one of the few instances where you’ll know what happened.

75. You pressured them on social media (you started “IBMShouldHireMichael.com” or started #IBMHireMike and had friends use it on Twitter endlessly, which is clever and has a slight chance of working if applying to a digital media role, but almost always just comes off as annoying and overly aggressive – not worth the risk). Plus, if you depended on that being your hook and they didn’t even notice, it was a hugely wasted effort.

76. You’re so addicted to internet jargon and slang that you used it on your resume or during an interview (“btw, your shoes are on fleek”). Save it for your tumblr, folks.

77. Being cute with videos, online resumes in infographic format, and so forth, forces an employer to investigate you outside of their normal parameters and could land you in the trash bin. Do those things in addition to the traditional resume requested.

78. Your social media accounts are offensive, filled with garbage, or overly sexualized – lock it down while on the job market.

79. You bitched about the company on social media “phone interviewer at X company was straight up retarded” — uh what!? This actually happened recently.

80. You didn’t express interest after the interview. In fact, you may have closed with “well I have several more interviews to complete, so I’ll have to get back to you,” hoping to prove value but really pissing off the employer.

The takeaway

If you’ve read this far, you know that sometimes it’s you, sometimes the stars just didn’t align properly. Sometimes you’ll get feedback, but most of the time, your secret demerits will remain locked in someone’s brain.

But now you know some of the pitfalls that you can fix, so you will. You can only control what you can control, the rest you simply have to let go of.

Let this information empower you, not discourage you.

Good luck during your job search, and don’t let the robots hold you back!

This story first published in April of 2017.

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Bed Bath & Beyond cites supply chain for store closures, but its much more

(BUSINESS) Bed Bath & Beyond and other chain stores have been shutting their doors in recent years citing supply chain or hiring, but what’s the truth?

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Women scrolling Bed Bath & Beyond website on laptop.

Outside of searching wedding registries for a shower you’re begrudgingly going to, the last time Bed Bath & Beyond was relevant was when Abby’s obsession with the store was a running joke on “Broad City.”

It’s no secret that many shoppers have shifted to Amazon for the same items Bed Bath & Beyond boasts, and the pandemic has not helped B3’s cause. As a result, many of your neighborhood locations have begun closing their doors.

This year, the company will be closing more locations, especially those they deem as “underperforming.”

In 2020, the retail chain announced that it would be shutting 200 stores over the next two years. Fast forward to now, and they’ve closed 170 of those 200. According to CNBC, the company is on track to hit the 200 mark by year’s end.

Bed Bath & Beyond Chief Executive Officer Mark Tritton that the company is continuing to explore more closures.

“We are executing a full-scale transformation and simultaneously running a business in a highly unpredictable environment,” Tritton said during an earnings conference call.

Information from the call and the company’s announcement revealed that Bed Bath shares are down 24.5% over the past 12 months.

The company also owns Buy Buy Baby, and many of those locations have begun closing around the country.

Now, the aforementioned “highly unpredictable environment” would spring to mind the pandemic and supply chain shortages. And the coronavirus was cited as the reason in 2020 to close 200 locations.

But, could those severities have just been an easy out for a company that has yet to be fully equipped to the change in times?

Much like other retailers trying to compete with the likes of Amazon, the quality of products has gone down in an effort to increase their profit margins while still attracting customers. And, let’s get real, no one has ever been upset by receiving a 20% Bed Bath & Beyond coupon in the mail.

The pandemic and the issues with the supply chain have certainly not helped matters, but this was likely to still be the brick and mortar’s trajectory.

What are your thoughts on the closures?

Below are the 37 Bed Bath & Beyond locations slated to close early this year:

Alabama

  • Oxford: 1000 Oxford Exchange Blvd.

Arizona

  • Casa Grande: 1004 North Promenade Parkway
  • Yuma: 1212 South Castle Dome Ave.

California

  • Campbell: Almarida Place, 515 East Hamilton Avenue
  • Laguna Niguel: 32391 Golden Lantern
  • Milpitas: 147 Great Mall Drive
  • Rancho Santa Margarita: 22235 El Paseo
  • Tustin: Tustin Market Place II, 13692 Jamboree Road

Florida

  • Orange City: 963 Harley Strickland Blvd.

Georgia

  • Atlanta: 130 Perimeter Center West
  • Marietta: 4475 Roswell Road

Idaho

  • Pocatello: 1732 Hurley Drive

Michigan

  • Jackson: 1132 Jackson Crossing

Minnesota

  • Duluth: 1303 Miller Trunk Highway
  • Eagan: 1295 Promenade Place

Missouri

  • Joseph: 5201 North Belt Highway

Mississippi

  • Meridian: 131 S. Frontage Road

New Jersey

  • Edgewater: Edgewater Commons, 489 River Road

New York

  • Auburn: Auburn Plaza, 217 Grant Ave.
  • Canandaigua: 328 Eastern Blvd.
  • Glenmont: 388 Feura Bush Road
  • Niagara Falls: 1520 Military Road
  • Plainview: 401 S. Oyster Bay Road
  • Port Chester: 25 Waterfront Place
  • Spring Valley: 14 B Spring Valley Marketplace

Ohio

  • Mansfield: Ontario Towne Center, 2259 Walker Lake Road

Pennsylvania

  • Pittsburgh: 7507 McKnight Road
  • York: 2845 Concord Road

Texas

  • Brownsville: Sunrise Palms Shopping Center, 3000 Pablo Kisel Blvd.
  • San Angelo: 4169 Sunset Drive

Virginia

  • Vienna: 2051 Chain Bridge Road

Washington

  • East Wenatchee: 511 Valley Mall Parkway
  • Longview: 200 Triangle Center
  • Seattle: 2600 SW Barton St.
  • Union Gap: 1740 East Washington St.

Wisconsin

  • Sheboygan: Memorial Mall, 3347 Kohler Memorial Drive

West Virginia

  • Triadelphia: 555 Cabela Drive

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Gig economy principles are being adopted by companies to fight burnout

(BUSINESS NEWS) The gig economy has had plenty of ups and downs, but employers are using it to advantage their teams and the gig workers.

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3 people in a meeting with a laptop looking at each other, representing the gig economy.

If you’re an employer of a lot of people, it’s no secret that there are a lot of moving parts involved in the day-to-day processes of keeping the business going. You’ve got full-time employees, people earning both salary and hourly wages, part-time workers, and more than likely have used a staffing agency over the years to fill in the blanks. Depending on your experience, some managers love working with temp agencies, while others aren’t the biggest fans. Like toppings on a hot dog, it all comes down to personal preference. But, there’s one segment of the market that’s roaring – the gig economy.

While on the surface, it might seem simple (someone comes in and does a job and leaves), it’s a little deeper than that. Depending on the industry, there needs to be a more nuanced approach to solving how staffing issues are handled.

When you think of the gig economy, you’re probably thinking of Uber or GrubHub, but a whole world has opened up – you can get your car fixed in your driveway or hire movers to come and take boxes away. There are a lot of apps out there putting money in people’s pockets thanks to taking on tasks like food delivery but also working on a crew for a day or being hospitality staff for a corporate gig.

Many people love the gig economy because honestly, the Internet has democratized our lives so much that millions of workers would rather be their own bosses, which honestly works to the advantage of businesses as well.

First, there’s less demand for the business because if they need a specific job taken care of, they can bring in some ringers to bang out the job, collect their pay, and move on. For companies, this helps because they’re only paying a one-time fee versus keeping someone on staff and paying them annually.

The boom right now is applications connecting workers with businesses who need help.

Instead of the consumer being the end-user, the applications connect a worker with a temporary or sometimes long-term employer with a click.

And the process is simple – workers are in just as much control as the companies. The price point is established by the company and the hours and people they need, but the worker can set their skill level and availability. So, when there’s a match, everyone wins.

While some of the companies offering access into the space, provide workers with gigs for whatever length of time, some of them are even doubling down on retention, offering W-2s and full insurance for staying in the worker community so employers have a larger pool to choose from.

This model works because it incentives both parties: the worker gets to work on their terms and still receive benefits, and the company gets the staff they need for project work without the HR/taxes/risk.

Listen: That W-2 aspect is enormous. The reason being is if you’ve ever had to deal with a 1099, they’re the worst. Taking away the burden of taxes is a significant win for the worker, especially those of us who still have trouble figuring out, “should I claim one or zero?”

Because this model addresses a major staffing problem, concerning short-term help, it’s still very focused on the worker.

The aspect of flexibility is built into the fabric of the concept, considering the labor pool is what matters – you can have a bunch of open jobs, but you need qualified and motivated people to fill those roles. While this is a gig-working scenario, it’s also unique in that there’s less focus on the person performing an idealized task like delivering food, but rather jumping on a team to solve a problem or finish a job.

Basically, they’ve digitized the temporary staffing model but cut all of the ugly overhead and worker quality issues out.

They’re taking a labor market and connecting it with a consumer via an app on the iPhone. But, the consumer isn’t someone who needs a ride to the airport, it’s a company who needs help staffing a Pearl Jam concert in a stadium.

With the market evolving pretty much on the hour these days, there’s a clear through-line at play – we’re seeing more and more businesses adopt gig workers, if even for the day.

It’s easier to bring someone in as a temp to help clear projects or just get things finished the regular staff is too busy to handle. One of the biggest pluses of the model is that it helps avoid employee burnout.

For a place like a hotel, if there are a bunch of small jobs that keep piling up, it’s easier to spend the cash for a day or two worth of work rather than add to an already overworked staff’s load.

It’s a new world that’s evolving every day, but with every swipe, tab, and click, we see the workforce develop in ways we could have never imagined just a few short years ago. If the future of work is now, imagining five years from now is mind-blowing.

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