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6 types of CEO you should avoid (or flock to)

(BUSINESS NEWS) The CEO is the leader, motivator, and source from which all other employees take direction. Knowing your CEO’s “type” can help improve your own work and balance out their quirks.

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Your boss’ boss’ boss’ boss

Without directly working with the head-honcho, you may forget that the CEO has a vital impact on your work experience. The CEO is the leader, motivator, and source from which all other employees take direction. However, it’s your responsibility to know who you’re working for. Luckily, Glassdoor has weighed in for anyone job hunting or hopping.

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The dreamer

Good characteristics: They are an idea generator. For this CEO, no task is too big, no idea too outrageous. They have big energy which others can feed off of.

Bad characteristics: With all of the ideas swirling around in their heads, these CEOs are often unpredictable. They are full of potential, but can lack the focus to follow-through.

Recommendations: Avoid if you are the type of worker that needs structure and clear guidance. When evaluating the CEO, try to notice if they are more doer or dreamer.

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The train conductor

Good characteristics: This CEO is all about order and consistency. They have a rigid schedule for themselves and everyone else. They care about making the company profitable and are disciplined enough to reach their goals.

Bad characteristics: The strict adherence to their schedules can stifle creativity and keep the company consistent but not growing. Things can become routine and thus boring.

Recommendations: For those most comfortable with the typical 9-5 expectations, this leader may work for you. If you know that you crave variety, steer clear.

The artist

Good characteristics: They are a visionary and a creative at heart. They are adamant to stick to the company’s original ideation and generate a worthy product that you can feel good about.

Bad characteristics: Though everything may seem full of hope, an Artist CEO can create internal chaos. They are not ideal business people and profits may suffer.

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Recommendations: Look for a CEO with a balance of artist and entrepreneurship. Also, pay attention to other management. If this CEO surrounds themselves with more “train-conductor” type managers, then they may be able to stay in line.

The know-it-all

Good characteristics: This Chief can offer you great advice, whether you want it or not.

Bad characteristics: The know-it-all does not typically seek outside help or admit defeat. They have an opinion on everything, but rarely listen to others. As an employee, you may be left in the dark and unable to have a voice in the company.

Recommendations: Research the CEO before your interview. Try to evaluate whether they are a genius or just arrogant.

The squirrel

Good characteristics: These CEOs are generally fun to work with and easily distracted.

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Bad characteristics: Though distraction can be a nice break from your day-to-day tasks, the company will suffer if the CEO can’t keep employees on track. Squirrel CEOs have short attention spans, are unable to delegate, and can lose sight of their goals.

Recommendations: See if there are other managers and mentors within the company that can keep you on track. Keep your updates with the leader brief and straight to the point.

Serial Entrepreneur

Good characteristics: They are the go-getters, full of ideas and follow-through to try and make their dreams into reality.

Bad characteristics: For most serial entrepreneurs, not all of their ventures pan out. They struggle managing their time across many projects and in turn, their business suffers.

Recommendations: Don’t go full force into this job unless you see the head honcho doing the same. Work realistically and keep your options open.

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#CEOTypes

Written By

Natalie is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and co-founded an Austin creative magazine called Almost Real Things. When she is not writing, she spends her time making art, teaching painting classes and confusing people. In addition to pursuing a writing career, Natalie plans on getting her MFA to become a Professor of Fine Art.

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