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What to do if your company is getting straight-to-voicemail calls

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(BUSINESS NEWS) Telemarketers newest rouse is straight to voicemail cold calls. No one likes cold calls, and no one likes cold voicemails, so let the FCC know it doesn’t fly with you.

pesky cold callers

Telemarketers are notorious for obnoxiously blowing up your phone with unwanted solicitations.

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They may soon be allowed to solicit in a much sneakier way, but that won’t make them any less intrusive.

Cold calls suck. Cold voicemails aren’t any better

Telemarketers and many Republicans are urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to permit straight-to-voicemail calls from telemarketers, citing the First Amendment as their basis for argument. That justification doesn’t fly for many consumer advocates. Sure, your phone doesn’t ring, but your voicemail inbox is still violated with spammy robocalls. Not only that, but you don’t even have the option to remove yourself from the telemarketer’s list.

Not down to be bombarded by silent solicitors? Take action.

In the spirit of free speech, anyone can file an informal complaint about issues with the communications services regulated by the FCC. There’s no charge or legal procedures involved, and you won’t have to appear in front of the FCC. Filing a complaint is quick and easy to do, and it can really make a difference.

How to file

Just head to the FCC Complaint Center and express your dissatisfaction, along with a suggested course of action to solve this problem. You can reach the FCC

By phone:
1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322); TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322); ASL: 1-844-432-2275

By mail:
Federal Communications Commission
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20554

*Be sure to include your name, address, contact information and as much detail as your complaint as possible

Make your voice heard

Consumer complaints are served on your provider and processed by the FCC’s Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division. Your provider has 30 days to respond, and will copy the FCC on its response.

In some cases, complaints might be shared among FCC bureaus and offices for further review or investigation.

While the FCC does not respond to every complaint, there is strength in numbers. After filing your complaint, tell your friends and coworkers to do the same, and spread the word about the issue. If enough people speak out against this pending legislation, they have a chance at protecting themselves from what is essentially harassment.

#FCCVoicemail

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