Connect with us

Opinion Editorials

Should agents disclose to clients when they have lost their own home?

Published

on

An industry secret

It’s considered hush hush, but many agents have lost their homes to foreclosure. This housing mess has affected everyone. Admit it or not, that includes us real estate agents. Realtors were not immune. Some of us speculated just as much as the banks and some of us got swept up in the dizzying ascent of the market. And frankly, some of us lost our shirts.

For those agents who have personally gone through foreclosure, do you tell clients, or do you sweep it under the rug? An agent’s own REO experience can be a blemish. People think “Wait, you’re supposed to be the real estate expert. How could this happen to you? Shouldn’t you know better? And if you couldn’t save your own house, what makes you think you can save my house?”

Painful, albeit valid, questions. Would you hire an electrician whose own sub-panel gets burnt to a crisp? A plumber whose own pipes explode? When we position ourselves as the authority on real estate, there is a certain expectation from consumers that we know what we are talking about. Our own real estate failings can discredit us.

The flip side of the coin

On the other hand, is it better to tell clients that you know first hand what they are going through? As prevalent as it is, foreclosure is still shameful and a seller may take solace that you can relate. A strong rapport helps, especially in distressed sales. Sometimes emotional support is more important to a client. Also having gone through the process yourself, you know the pitfalls to avoid. Sharing your past mistakes can help them navigate the rocky road ahead.

Do you think agents who have lost property in a foreclosure or a short sale ought to disclose this to clients? Are they more or less qualified to assist owners facing repossession?

Watch Real Estate Expert Herman Chan put the REAL back in REALTY. In his show Habitat for Hermanity, Herman skewers the real estate business and pokes fun at his fellow agents, all the while empowering buyers & sellers with behind-the-scene tips & secrets of the industry! Get a glimpse beyond the glitz & glam of real estate. It's a hot mess! Featured on HGTV, House Hunters & other media outlets, Herman is the undisputed Real Estate Maven whose helpful & hilarious commentary you just can't live without! In fact, his real estate TV show has just been optioned in Hollywood!

Continue Reading
Advertisement
9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Rachel LaMar, J.D.

    October 22, 2011 at 11:53 am

    Honesty is always the best policy. We are also better educators because of our mistakes, so my answer is a resounding "yes."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Opinion Editorials

Don’t buy the hype that Google’s $13B investment is about creating US jobs

(EDITORIAL) Google has announced a massive expansion for their data centers and offices, but don’t buy into their hype that they’re saviors of the jobs market…

Published

on

google classes

Google is reportedly investing $13 billion in their data centers and offices this year in the United States. Most of that money will be spent outside of tech centers like Silicon Valley and Seattle.

Nebraska, Ohio, Nevada, and Texas will each be getting data centers. The centers in Oklahoma and Virginia will be expanded.

Google’s CEO , Sundar Pichai, writes, “These new investments will give us the capacity to hire tens of thousands of employees, and enable the creation of more than 10,000 new construction jobs in Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Texas, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Virginia.”

The whole blog post is dedicated to how Google is connecting with communities and how it benefits the economy and supports jobs here in the U.S.

Is Google concerned about local economies?

Google does contribute to the community. I live close to a data center in Oklahoma, and I’ve heard how much it’s done for the economy in the town. I’ve also heard rumors that other communities are jealous. The company created jobs for locals. The schools are enjoying the benefits. Locally, when Google comes in, it can be a real blessing.

They want us to believe that they’re doing society a favor by “investing in communities and creating jobs.” But what are they really doing?

I believe that Google is simply spreading their tentacles further and making us more dependent on what they have to offer. According to Business Insider, Alphabet, the parent company of Google, “is a massive corporation that encompasses everything from internet-beaming hot air balloons to self-driving cars…” and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

What Is Google’s motive?

If you’re a business owner, when was the last time you made a decision that was altruistic only toward the community? Face it, whether you’re a DBA or major corporation, every choice you make has to benefit your bottom line. If it doesn’t, you might as well be a non-profit 501c3 organization.

Google may benefit local communities by creating jobs and paying taxes, but don’t let the hype fool you. They’re simply maintaining their stronghold in tech by investing $13 billion in their company. Their stakeholders are simply looking forward to the profits that investment will generate.

Continue Reading

Opinion Editorials

Are liberal arts majors about to dominate the next wave of tech entrepreneurship? Yup!

(OPINION EDITORIAL) What do Liberal Arts majors and tech innovators have in common? Everything.

Published

on

remote workers

*This is a guest story from Austin author, Will Ruff*

Crossing lines

This is a purely speculative article coming from a liberal arts major, and I do have a dog in this fight. That is: I have a liberal arts background, and I want to tell you how we’re about to drive the next wave of tech entrepreneurship based on my own experience.

bar
Engineers have driven us forward at an incredible pace in the past few years, now it’s time for liberal arts majors to pick up the slack and tell everyone how incredible their work is. And that’s exactly what you can expect us to do: tell an incredible story.

Life comes at you fast

Let’s take a look at the past few years. Tech has moved fast. Unbelievably fast. Look at the smartphone’s evolution over the last ten years. Can you remember what kind of phone you had when an iPhone came out? I had a blackberry, and was doing door-to-door sales in college. I pine for that phone now, but they’re not really practical given how much screen I need.

In many cases, tech has moved so fast that the general population who buys a smartphone doesn’t really know what they’re getting out of a new upgrade and while they might adopt whatever new features are out there, their purchase is not driven by need.

Does a fingerprint scanner, or force touch really advance my productivity, or my security? No.

Whatever feature they’re selling you on this year will be equally underwhelming. And I would argue at best, because phones are all 99% the same, whether or not you want to admit this, that the companies behind them are struggling to differentiate themselves to their customer base, and they use features to do it. Features tell the story. The tech hasn’t really been revolutionary for years.

The big why

Think about the last time you had to buy a phone. We’ll assume that now you use one so much, you actually couldn’t imagine living without one. That’s me anyway. And we’ve all been there—the phone is locked up, or the screen’s cracked, the software upgrade shut it down, permanently, and now you have to get something new. But they should just replace it for free, I’ve been a customer for so long. Nice try. Maybe this time I’ll try an iPhone, or an Android. I’ve heard cool things about Pixel.

For whatever reason, we’ve decided to choose an operating system based on features we haven’t used yet, and this is driving up the cost of cell phones to be as expensive as a nice laptop. Well maybe they’re willing to spring an extra $200 for this new feature finally. Why wouldn’t I want this beautiful curved screen that has no edge?

For the record I’m an android user, but I could use any phone and be happy.

Now, I have nothing against advancing technology, despite my snarky tone, but the above illustrates a point of mine that is going to become more evident in the future.

Technology is only successful when you can tell its story to the audience who’s meant to use it.

It has to be clear, and it has to be on their terms. Engineers, and STEM workers absolutely drive all of the innovation, and it’s not a battle between the two, but we live in a world where billions of people have access to the Internet, and that means you have a lot more opportunity to build a business from anywhere. Not everyone is going to speak the language of engineers who build these incredible tools, and not every engineer is going to know their product can solve problems they didn’t even think of, because they can’t and shouldn’t spend most of their time talking to potential customers.

This is another area where liberal arts majors can excel.

They can look at these two groups: the engineers they work with, and the prospective customers who might use it, and they can figure out how the two are best introduced. What context they should meet under. This should always be how it works. Now, there is the rare breed of people who can be an engineer and a great sales rep, but the vast majority of people have to focus on one thing to do it well.

So, how do liberal arts majors climb into the driver’s seat in the future? I see two fundamental pieces that have to be in place.

Two steps

First, the ability to learn about technology and code is relatively cheap, and you can do it after school, and on the weekends. I did this myself after starting my career as a content strategist for a literary PR company who built sites in WordPress, and it led to designing/building/selling a website to a local business. I decided that wasn’t for me, but there’s probably some liberal arts majors out there who can do it much more efficiently than I did.

The more you know about how these things work, the more opportunity you’ll have to work for these growing companies.

The next piece is helping the next great tech company pitch their product to customers. It’s knowing how to find a potential market for something, and not being afraid to go up to anyone anywhere just to say hi, and to find out what they do. You can’t always be selling, but you can always ask questions, and maybe down the road you can help someone solve a problem because you connected with someone else who does that exact thing they need. Guess what, you’re their hero now.

Symbiosis

The shift between tech and humanities is cyclical and we absolutely will always need each other. That’s the point of this article. We’re not constantly aware of how to work with the other, but we’re getting to a point where it’s absolutely true that non-tech people have a role in spreading the reach of useful technology to people who didn’t have access a decade ago.

Things like WordPress, social media, and smartphones have made it easy to tell people how you’re about to change the world. And the next phase of this cycle is mass adoption, education, and communication among the crowds who haven’t quite figured out how to use all these cool tools yet. Strap yourself in, and hug a tech person, or a liberal arts major.

#LiberalArts

Will Ruff is the author of “The Tomb of the Primal Dragon: A Novel” which is available for Preorder on Amazon now. You can follow him on @twitter for crass and meaningless commentary, or sign up for his email newsletter and he might spam you with free books occasionally.

Continue Reading

Opinion Editorials

The case for using the Oxford comma

A humorous look at why a tiny comma can make a tremendous difference in your emails and marketing efforts.

Published

on

oxford comma

Depending on where you grew up, you were likely taught in grade school that in a list of three or more items, a comma is placed before the coordinating conjunction (“and,” “or,” and sometimes “nor”) in the list. Some were taught that this is mandatory, while others were told it is an irrelevant rule, and these conflicting teaching methods have led to a confused nation.

That comma is called the Oxford comma, and while some call it a serial comma, others still prefer the hoity toity title of Harvard comma. How the Oxford comma works is as follows:

  • With the Oxford comma: “I have lived in Nashville, Toronto, and Mexico City.”
  • Without the Oxford comma: “I have lived in Nashville, Toronto and Mexico City.”

You may read those examples and think that there is literally no difference. The Oxford comma was originally eliminated by publishers where each manually loaded character was questioned as real estate on a page was at a premium. Publishers looked at sentences like the two above and agreed that there was no difference. Therefore, the AP Stylebook, which is still followed by traditional journalists today (but rejected by AGBeat).

The Oxford comma is common in many non-English languages of Latin descent, like Spanish, Italian, Greek, and French, to name a few. So why do some so vehemently disagree with this tiny comma’s use? Some say it introduces ambiguity, it is redundant in situations where coordinating conjunctions already point out the logical separation between items, and it adds unnecessary characters to text (important in the original publication days, and now relevant again with Twitter users).

No one here is an expert in grammar. Several of us have English and journalism degrees, and we write thousands of pages per month, but we make just as many mistakes as the next person. Collectively, we have a select few pet peeves, such as ignoring the poor Oxford comma.

Take a look at the pictures below and tell us in the comments whether or not you agree that the Oxford comma is vital to the language:

oxford comma rules
using the oxford comma
tim tebow and the oxford comma
god and the oxford comma
lincoln and the oxford comma

This editorial was first published here in 2012, and we stand by it today!

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories