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10 social media facts you might not know

(Social Media) Ten facts about social media that you probably don’t know, but definitely should.

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social media facts

social media facts

Social media facts you might not know

Social media has become the mainstream way to market in the digital age. There seems to be a platform for every social need. Connecting with friends and family: Facebook and Twitter have you covered. Looking for a new job, or new colleagues: LinkedIn is great for forging new relationships; wondering how to save all those promo photos: Instagram and Flickr can keep them save while freeing up space on your devices.

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Regardless of which social media platforms we interact with, they are a part of daily life. According to a study by FastCo, there are a handful of facts about social media you likely do not know, but should.

1. Your advocates’ follower counts

First: your biggest advocates have the fewest followers. Less than one out of every ten mentions will come from power users. 91% of mentions have less than 500 followers and 6% of all mentions were deemed overly negative and therefore of no use in regards to marketing.

2. Different types of crowds

Second: Twitter has six distinct communication networks, with six distinct types these are: polarized crowds: politics or divisive topics; tight crowds: hobbies or professional topics; brand clusters: brands, public events, or trends; community clusters: global news events; broadcast networks: media outlets, famous individuals;support networks: companies or services with customer support (read more about these types and what they mean to your marketing efforts, here).

3. Which is better – visual or written content?

Third: marketers say written content trumps visuals; 58% prefer original written content, 19% original visual assets. This seems difficult to believe in our highly visual world, but perhaps it is because we are so overrun with visuals, written content stands out from the crowd.

4. You have a limited amount of time to respond

Fourth: to optimize your marketing opportunities, you have less than one hour to respond to a Tweet on Twitter. The study found 53% of users who tweet a brand, expect a response within the hour. If this Tweet happens to be a complaint, an astounding 72% of people expect a response within the hour. This means you need someone, or some application, dedicated to responding to social media posts, if you truly want to keep your customers happy.

5. Best time to retweet?

Fifth: the best time to retweet is late at night, particularly between 10 to 11 p.m. This advice follows the late-night infomercial effect (share when share volume is lower, and your content has a greater chance to stand out), so it makes sense to see that this type of engagement would be highest after hours. Try this out with some of your Tweets and see if your level of engagement changes based on the time of day.

6. When to Facebook?

Sixth: Fridays are Facebook’s best day for engagement. Friday all three types of content (comments, likes, and shares) are high. The next best day is Sunday. You might trying saving your best stuff for the end of the week when people are truly ready to engage with your content and see if it changes the amount of engagement you receive.

7. What’s making Facebook Pages successful?

Seventh: photos are driving engagement on Facebook pages. As of March 20, 2014, 75% of page updates are photos. Try posting more photos on your Facebook feed, but keep in mind the third suggestion: written content trumps visual, so while more people are sharing photos, make sure you include a line of text relevant to your product or service.

8. Where is all of the traffic?

Eighth: Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter drive the most traffic. These three offer the most referred traffic, whereas, YouTube, Google+, and LinkedIn ranked as the top three sources for referrals in terms of time on site, pages per visit, and bounce rate. According to Fast Company if you’re after a big reach and spreading brand awareness, go with Facebook and Twitter, and think long and hard about joining Pinterest, too. If you are interested in more qualified traffic, then be sure to invest time in Google+, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Wherever your business needs traffic, social media can assist.

9. Why can’t you reach fans on Facebook?

Ninth: As Facebook rules have changed, page reach has dwindled. Fast Company suggests new per post goals: aim for 28, 118, or 385 interactions per post, depending on your total fans. Pages with 1 to 9,999 fans: 28 interactions per post; 10,000 to 99,999 fans: 118 interactions per post; and 100,000 to 499,999 fans: 385 interactions per post. Interactions include comments, likes, and shares. These are not hard and fast rules, but can serve as guideposts to know if you are heading in the right direction.

10. Winning on Pinterest

Finally, studies have found there is an optimal day for almost every category on Pinterest. Monday is fitness. Tuesday is best for technology. Wednesday is best for quotes. Thursday is best for fashion. Friday is best for humor. Saturday is best for travel. Sunday is best for food and crafts. If your brand fits one or more of these categories, make sure you are pinning something on the appropriate day to optimize your reach.

While these finding can give you a good starting point, they may not work for every brand and every situation. Test them out and see if you can expand your reach by change the day you post, what you post, or what time you post. Simple changes could make a big difference.

10 social media facts

Jennifer Walpole is a Senior Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds a Master's degree in English from the University of Oklahoma. She is a science fiction fanatic and enjoys writing way more than she should. She dreams of being a screenwriter and seeing her work on the big screen in Hollywood one day.

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Justine Espersen

    July 29, 2014 at 4:00 pm

    This is something definitely to keep in mind the next time I engage on social media (which will probably be at the most 30 seconds after I post this). Thanks for sharing your insight!

  2. Luke Arthur

    July 30, 2014 at 6:28 pm

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  3. Yogita Aggarwal

    August 27, 2014 at 3:53 am

    Great Post Jennifer for social media freaks like me 🙂

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Social Media

Snapchat shifts strategy to open their arms to competitors

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Snapchat opens some interesting doors after keeping the padlocked for years – will this new strategy solidify their status as a digital giant?

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There’s no denying the notable impact that Snapchat has had on the visual side of social media apps. From knock-off Snapchat-esque filters to more egregious rips such as the “Stories” feature, allusions to Snapchat are inherent in the bulk of social media platforms. Snapchat’s response is simple: to monetize these allusions via the Snapchat Story Kit.

The “Stories” feature has rapidly become a massive part of platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, with over a billion daily story users across these three services. Comparatively, Snapchat enjoys around 186 million daily story users, making it nearly impossible for the original story curator to compete.

Like many modern businesses, Snapchat’s initial response was to ignore the competition in a display of relentless, self-indulgent optimism. Now that such optimism has been dampened by cold, hard numbers, Snapchat is turning to another venue: sharing.

By sharing their “Stories” feature via a new developer suite — called the “Snapchat Story Kit” — Snapchat will be able to monetize its most ubiquitous aspect while maintaining some semblance of branding across any participating platforms.

In theory, the Snapchat Story Kit will allow app users to post their Snapchat stories to apps such as Tinder, Twitter, and so on; this will enable the same level of story interaction one would find within Snapchat or on Facebook without taking the focus away from Snapchat’s API.

Since any story posted via the Snapchat Story Kit will still go through Snapchat rather than a nonpartisan third-party app or program, this move will continue to emphasize Snapchat’s presence in the visual world.

There are a few possible downsides to this power-grab, not least of which is Facebook’s level of control at the time of this writing. Since Facebook already uses its own version of the “Stories” feature on all of its most-frequented apps, Snapchat has essentially missed out on some of the most powerful opportunities to monetize its features.

It’s also within the realm of reason to assume that Snapchat will require Snapchat Story Kit users to jump through additional hoops before they can use its features—a move that, similarly to the Bitmoji jump, may prove to be more annoying than hindering.

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Social Media

MeWe – the social network for your inner Ron Swanson

MeWe, a new social media site, seems to offer everything Facebook does and more, but with privacy as a foundation of its business model. Said MeWe user Melissa F., “It’s about time someone figured out that privacy and social media can go hand in hand.”

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Let’s face it: Facebook is kind of creepy. Between facial recognition technology, demanding your real name, and mining your accounts for data, social media is becoming increasingly invasive. Users have looked for alternatives to mainstream social media that genuinely value privacy, but the alternatives to Facebook have been lackluster.

MeWe is poised to change all of that, if it can muster up a network strong enough to compete with Facebook. On paper, the new social media site seems to offer everything Facebook does and more, but with privacy as a foundation of its business model. Said MeWe user Melissa F., “It’s about time someone figured out that privacy and social media can go hand in hand.”

MeWe prioritizes privacy in every aspect of the site, and in fact, users are protected by a “Privacy Bill of Rights.” MeWe does not track, mine, or share your data, and does not use facial recognition software or cookies. (In fact, you can take a survey on MeWe to estimate how many cookies are currently tracking you – apparently I have 18 cookies spying on me!)

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You don’t have to share that “as of [DATE] my content belongs to me” status anymore.

Everything you post on MeWe belongs to you – the site does not try to claim ownership over your content – and you can download your profile in its entirety at any time. MeWe doesn’t even pester you with advertising. Instead of making money by selling your data (hence the hashtag #Not4Sale) or advertising, the site plans to profit by offering additional paid services, like extra data and bonus apps.

So what does MeWe do? Everything Facebook does, and more. You can share photos and videos, send messages or live chat. You can also attach voice messages to any of your posts, photos, or videos, and you can create Snapchat-like disappearing content.

You can also sync your profile to stash content in your personal storage cloud. Everything you post is protected, and you can fine-tune the permission controls so that you can decide exactly who gets to see your content and who doesn’t – “no creepy stalkers or strangers.”

MeWe is available for Android, iOS, desktops, and tablets.

This story was originally published in January 2016, but the social network suddenly appears to be gaining traction.

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Social Media

How to spot if your SEO, PPC, social media marketing service provider is a con-artist

(BUSINESS) When hiring a professional, did you know there are actual questions you can ask to spot a con-artist? Too often, we trust our guts and go with the gregarious person, but too much is on the line to keep doing that with your business.

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In this day and age the cult of positive thinking and “the law of attraction” are still very much alive and well in the business services industry. Here are a few simple questions that you can ask prospective business service providers to help you gauge if they are the real deal or just caught up in the fad of “say yes to everything,” or “outsource everything” being populated online by countless “thought leaders” and cult gurus.

Lots of people will ask, “What’s the harm of people trying to make something of themselves?”

Well, I’m here to tell you there is a huge harm in taking risks with a client’s money and manipulating people into trusting their “expertise” when they have none.

Business owners: Due diligence is more important than ever these days.

There are whole communities of people helping to prop each-other up as experts in fields they know nothing about while outsourcing their tasks with little or no oversight into the actual work being done on your behalf.

It is nearly impossible for you to tell if this is even going on. Don’t worry. I am here to help you avoid a con-artist.

How? By showing you how to weed out the bad actors by asking really simple questions.

This set of questions is perfect for people who need to distinguish if the expert they are talking is really just an expert in bullshit with a likeable personality.

Why do these questions work? Because people who are into this kind of stuff are rarely hesitant to talk about it when you ask them direct questions. They believe that what they are doing is a good thing and so they are more open to sharing this information with you because they think by you by asking that you are also into similar things.

It is a fun little trick I picked up while learning to do consumer polling and political surveying.

The Questions:

  • Who influences you professionally?
  • Do you follow any “thought leaders” “gurus” or coaches? If so, who?
  • What “school” of thought do you ascribe to in your profession, and where do you learn what you know?
  • Are there any industry standards you do not agree with?
  • How do you apply the services you offer to your own company?
  • Can you please tell me the background of your support staff and can I see their CV’s?
  • Do you outsource or white label any of the work your company does?
  • May we audit your process before buying your services?
  • May we discuss your proposed strategies with others in your industry to ensure quality?
  • Would you be open to speaking with an independent consultant that is knowledgeable about your industry about your proposals?
  • Can you show me examples of your past successful jobs?
  • Do you have any industry accepted certifications and how many hours of study do you do in a year to keep your knowledge up-to-date and current?
  • How many clients have you had in the past?
  • How many clients do you have currently?
  • How many clients are you able to handle at one time?
  • How many other clients do you have that are in the same industry as my company?
  • How long is your onboarding process before we start getting down to actually making changes to help solve the issues my company is facing?
  • Can you explain to me the steps you will take to identify my company’s needs?
  • Have you ever taken a course in NLP or any other similar course of study?
  • Have you ever been a part of a Multi-Level Marketing company?
  • Fun. Right? Well, we aren’t done.

    It is not just enough to ask these questions… you have to pay attention to the answers, as well as the WAY they are answering questions.

    And you also have to RESEARCH the company after you get your answers to make sure they ring true.

    You cannot keep accepting people at face value, not when the risk is to your business, employees, and clients. There is little to no risk for a person who is being dishonest about their capabilities and skill sets. They will walk away with your money, ready to go find another target for a chance meeting that seems amazingly perfect.

    Do not leave your business decisions to chance encounters at networking events. Research before saying yes.

    No matter how likeable or appealing the person you are speaking with is.

    How do you research? Easy. THE INTERNET. Look at the website of the company you are considering working with.

    • Does it look professional? (do not use your website as a standard for professional unless you have had it done by a professional)
    • Can you see a list of their past clients?
    • Do they effectively tell their story as a company or are they just selling?
    • What do their social media profiles look like? Do they have many followers? Are they updated regularly?
    • Do they have any positive reviews on social sites? (Yelp, Facebook, Linkedin, etc)

    You can also do some simple things like running SEO Website Checkers on their websites. There are tons of these online for free and they will give you a pretty good indicator of if they are using best practices on their websites – you can even do this research on their clients’ websites.

    Also, if you know anything about SpyFu, you can run their website through that to see how they are doing their own online marketing (the same can be said for their clients if they are selling this service).

    Facebook also has a cool section that shows you ads that a Page is running. You can find this info connected to their business Page as well as the Pages they manage for their clients as well. None of these things automatically disqualify a potential service provider, but their answers the question of “why” things are the way there are might be very illuminating to you as a business owner.

    This may seem like a lot of work, and it can be if you do not do these things regularly and have them down to a system, but the cost of not doing these things is way too high. A con-artist is born every day, thanks to the internet.

    You have a right as a business owner considering services from a vendor to ask these questions.

    They also have the responsibility as a service provider to answer these questions in a professional manner. Sometimes the way in which they answer the questions is far more important than the actual answer.

    If all of this seems too overwhelming for you to handle, that is okay.

    • You can ask one of your staff in your company to take on this role and responsibility.
    • You can hire someone to come in and help you with these decisions (and you can ask them all the same questions as above before taking their services).
    • You can reach out to other business owners in your network to see if they have recommendations for someone who could help you with things.
    • Heck, you can even call up companies that look like they are doing as well as you want to be doing online and ask them who they are using for their services. Try successful companies in other industries as your competitor won’t likely be interested in sharing their secrets with you…

    What is important is that you are asking questions, researching, and ultimately making sure that you are doing as much as possible to ensure making the best decision for your company.

    Final thoughts:

    “But, Jay, what’s wrong with taking a risk on an up-and-comer?”

    The answer to that is NOTHING. There is nothing wrong with taking a chance on someone. Someone being green doesn’t make them a con-artist.

    The issue I am raising is in the honest portrayal of businesses and their capabilities. It is about honesty.

    I am a huge fan of working with people who are new and passionate about an industry. But I only work with people who are honest with me about who they are, what they can do, and how their processes work.

    I have worked with tons of people who are still learning on the job. It can be quite educational for a business owner as well.

    Just make sure they are being honest about everything up front. You are no obligated to give anyone a chance when it comes to your businesses success, and it’s not right that someone might manipulate you into doing so.

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